Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsStereotactic Radiosurgery
IN THE NEWS

Stereotactic Radiosurgery

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1993
I must protest the manner in which my comments were represented in the Feb. 9 article on radiosurgery ("Radiosurgery Technique to Make O.C. Debut Today"). A reporter spent approximately 25 minutes on the telephone asking my opinion about various matters relating to stereotactic radiosurgery, and what was discussed has been abbreviated in such a way as to make it look as if we at UCI (Medical Center) are completely insensitive to the issue of medical costs and the proliferation of expensive "high-tech" equipment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1993
I must protest the manner in which my comments were represented in the Feb. 9 article on radiosurgery ("Radiosurgery Technique to Make O.C. Debut Today"). A reporter spent approximately 25 minutes on the telephone asking my opinion about various matters relating to stereotactic radiosurgery, and what was discussed has been abbreviated in such a way as to make it look as if we at UCI (Medical Center) are completely insensitive to the issue of medical costs and the proliferation of expensive "high-tech" equipment.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1990 | SY MONTGOMERY, Montgomery is a free-lance writer based in Hancock, N.H
In cancer treatment, brain tumors often defy doctors' best conventional therapies. Chemotherapies seldom work because the natural blood-brain barrier prevents blood-borne toxins (and medicines) from reaching the brain. The use of conventional radiation therapy is limited by the risks of damaging healthy areas of the brain. Surgery, while usually the treatment of choice, may not be possible: Some areas of the brain cannot be safely operated upon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1990 | SY MONTGOMERY, Montgomery is a free-lance writer based in Hancock, N.H
In cancer treatment, brain tumors often defy doctors' best conventional therapies. Chemotherapies seldom work because the natural blood-brain barrier prevents blood-borne toxins (and medicines) from reaching the brain. The use of conventional radiation therapy is limited by the risks of damaging healthy areas of the brain. Surgery, while usually the treatment of choice, may not be possible: Some areas of the brain cannot be safely operated upon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 6, 1992 | JON NALICK
Western Medical Center-Santa Ana will open its 24-room cancer ward today, permitting patients who might otherwise have to travel to Los Angeles for some treatments to stay closer to home. Hospital officials unveiled the 14,000-square-foot wing on July 1, as well as a state-of-the-art diagnostic device called a "flow cytometer." The $80,000 machine speedily analyzes blood samples with a laser, helping physicians diagnose and treat various kinds of cancer.
SPORTS
August 26, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
John Roethlisberger took the lead with a fluid routine on the still rings Wednesday night and maintained it throughout the compulsory portion of the men's all-around competition in the National Gymnastics Championships at Salt Lake City. Roethlisberger, the defending U.S. all-around champion, followed a 9.65 score on the rings with a 9.4 vault and a 9.5 on the horizontal bar. When he dropped from the bar at the end of his routine, the 23-year-old from Afton, Minn.
NEWS
February 9, 1993 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 32-year-old woman whose cancerous brain tumor could not be completely removed with traditional surgery expects to have it destroyed today by radiation in the first such operation in Orange County. Described as "surgery without a knife," the stereotactic radiosurgery will be offered beginning this week at Hoag Hospital in Newport Beach and at Western Medical Center-Santa Ana.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|