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Stereotypes

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Defying enduring stereotypes about black fatherhood, a federal survey of American parents shows that by most measures, black fathers who live with their children are just as involved as other dads who live with their kids - or more so. For instance, among fathers who lived with young children, 70% of black dads said they bathed, diapered or dressed those kids every day, compared with 60% of white fathers and 45% of Latino fathers, according to...
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
If the gay-themed "Tennessee Queer" came out 20 years ago - or was at least a more deftly made film - perhaps it wouldn't seem so desperately past its sell-by date. But this unevenly acted yuckfest, which is as unsubtle as its title, has all the pizazz of a bad sitcom episode. When Jason Potts (Christian Walker), a New York City librarian living in domestic bliss with his idyllic boyfriend (Jerre Dye), is summoned back to his native Smyth, Tenn., under false pretenses (long story)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 14, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
In the middle of the rainbowy revelers at the pride parade in West Hollywood, Jeremy Stacy was questioned: Are you really bisexual? "One guy came up to me and said, 'You're really gay,' " said Stacy, who was standing under a sign reading "Ask a Bisexual. " "I told him I had a long line of ex-girlfriends who would vehemently disagree. And he said, 'That doesn't matter, because I know you're gay.' " Stacy had gotten the question before. From a friend who said anyone who had slept with men must be gay - even if he had also slept with women.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
Kristina Wong has crashed Miss Chinatown pageants as a pimply, cigar-smoking, over-the-hill contestant. She has posed as a rabid Jeremy Lin fan, waving sexually suggestive signs at the NBA player's games. On a sewing machine in her Koreatown apartment, she makes vagina puppets out of colored felt. So when she found herself in front of television cameras discussing the popularity of Asian women on the dating scene, Wong was in her element. "Suck it, white ladies! I got it!
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 15, 1992
I am 18 and in my first year at UC San Diego. I am writing in response to Youth Opinion (Voices, Nov. 30) that featured teen-agers' feelings on stereotypes. I have never read a newspaper article that I could relate to more than this, especially the excerpt by Aburee Duggan. My mother is white and my father is a Spanish-Filipino. I have been labeled everything from Filipino to Mexican to Native-American. It makes me feel as if I don't have any real identity. I tell people I'm half Filipino, half white.
NEWS
January 26, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Can cause of death determine race? In some cases, the answer appears to be yes. When coroners and undertakers fill out death certificates, one of the pieces of information they must provide is the race of the deceased. That can be a somewhat subjective call, and one of the things that may influence an official's perception of it is the particular way the person died, according to a team of sociologists from UC Irvine and the University of Oregon in Eugene. They looked at data from 22,905 death certificates in the 1993 National Mortality Followback Survey , which compared information on official certificates to information provided by family members to see if it matched.
SCIENCE
April 8, 2011 | By Amina Khan, Los Angeles Times
Picture yourself in a well-kept room — pictures neatly hung on walls, books organized on a shelf, floors clear of junk. Now sit yourself in a room with crooked pictures, scattered books and dirty laundry on the floor. Feeling any different? In the second room, you might be more apt to keep your distance from a person of another race, believe that Muslims are aggressive or think that gay people are creative, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science. The idea, said researchers from Tilburg University in the Netherlands, is that people in messy environments tend to compensate for that disorder by categorizing people in their minds according to well-known stereotypes.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
Kristina Wong has crashed Miss Chinatown pageants as a pimply, cigar-smoking, over-the-hill contestant. She has posed as a rabid Jeremy Lin fan, waving sexually suggestive signs at the NBA player's games. On a sewing machine in her Koreatown apartment, she makes vagina puppets out of colored felt. So when she found herself in front of television cameras discussing the popularity of Asian women on the dating scene, Wong was in her element. "Suck it, white ladies! I got it!
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Susan Denley
Karl Lagerfeld is raising eyebrows among some critics for using feathered headdresses and warpaint-like golden makeup during Chanel's "Metier d'Art" show in Dallas on Tuesday. He also drew on other Western stereotypes -- cowboys, ranchers -- but the use of Native American stereotypes in fashion has been controversial. [The Cut] Actress Gwyneth Paltrow and fitness guru Tracy Anderson, who recently launched a web series together called "The Restart Project," are developing a television series on love and weight loss, Anderson says.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
If the gay-themed "Tennessee Queer" came out 20 years ago - or was at least a more deftly made film - perhaps it wouldn't seem so desperately past its sell-by date. But this unevenly acted yuckfest, which is as unsubtle as its title, has all the pizazz of a bad sitcom episode. When Jason Potts (Christian Walker), a New York City librarian living in domestic bliss with his idyllic boyfriend (Jerre Dye), is summoned back to his native Smyth, Tenn., under false pretenses (long story)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
The giddy, broad, candy-colored "G.B.F" takes a sharp and amusing look at what happens when three high school queen bees discover what's missing from their arsenals of cutting-edge cool: a gay best friend, hence "G.B.F. " So when the sweet, tentative and, as one of the quasi-mean girls notes, "not even that fabulous" Tanner (an endearing Michael J. Willett) is outed via a mishap with a guy-on-guy hookup app, the bees swarm. The girls (Sasha Pieterse, Andrea Bowen and Xosha Roquemore)
OPINION
January 5, 2014 | By Becky Aikman
When the Crawley clan of "Downton Abbey" returns to American television this weekend, I will take more than a sporting interest in the fate of the newly widowed Lady Mary. As someone who was widowed at a relatively young age myself, my fondest hope is this: that she will be no lady. Perhaps she can help the rest of us sort out what constitutes proper behavior for a woman whose husband has died. Being a widow is one of the few female roles for which social norms still lag in a bygone era, reinforced by literature and popular culture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Brent Kroeger pores over nasty online comments about stay-at-home dads, wondering if his friends think those things about him. The Rowland Heights father remembers high school classmates laughing when he said he wanted to be a "house husband. " He avoids mentioning it on Facebook. "I don't want other men to look at me like less of a man," Kroeger said. His fears are tied to a bigger phenomenon: The gender revolution has been lopsided. Even as American society has seen sweeping transformations - expanding roles for women, surging tolerance for homosexuality - popular ideas about masculinity seem to have stagnated.
OPINION
December 26, 2013 | By Rosalind C. Barnett and Caryl Rivers
Recent headlines bemoan the fact that, in the city of Los Angeles, only one woman - recently elected to a City Council with 14 men - holds elected office in City Hall. As for L.A. County, with 9.9 million residents, a lone woman sits on its five-member Board of Supervisors. California is not alone. Across the United States, only 73 women hold statewide elected offices - less than a quarter of available positions. That percentage has been declining for 12 years, according to the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Defying enduring stereotypes about black fatherhood, a federal survey of American parents shows that by most measures, black fathers who live with their children are just as involved as other dads who live with their kids - or more so. For instance, among fathers who lived with young children, 70% of black dads said they bathed, diapered or dressed those kids every day, compared with 60% of white fathers and 45% of Latino fathers, according to...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Annlee Ellingson
The immigrant smuggler at the center of "Coyote" is hardly a cartel-hardened pollero . Rather, Brian (Robert J. Steinmiller Jr.) is a white, middle-class Angeleno pushing 30 and still living at home. When he loses his job teaching a food-handling course for being too explicit in his descriptions about how bacteria spread, his metalhead Uncle Jimmy (Dennis W. Hall) gives him a gig in construction - as well as dubious life advice. In his new dirty job, Brian's germaphobia is swiftly replaced by a new obsession with his Latino co-workers, who, peddling in stereotypes, include a benevolent gardener working for a better life for his sons and a gangster electrician with a stash of loot left over from the riots.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Susan Denley
Karl Lagerfeld is raising eyebrows among some critics for using feathered headdresses and warpaint-like golden makeup during Chanel's "Metier d'Art" show in Dallas on Tuesday. He also drew on other Western stereotypes -- cowboys, ranchers -- but the use of Native American stereotypes in fashion has been controversial. [The Cut] Actress Gwyneth Paltrow and fitness guru Tracy Anderson, who recently launched a web series together called "The Restart Project," are developing a television series on love and weight loss, Anderson says.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NORFOLK, Neb. - One night last year, Rachel Liester was waitressing at a restaurant near this rural town when she received an unusual request. A director was preparing to shoot a movie nearby, and her ticking off of the specials made her sufficiently camera-ready to merit an audition. Soon after, Liester was reading for the director, who turned out to be Oscar winner Alexander Payne. And when Payne's "Nebraska" - a coming-home father-son dramedy starring Will Forte and Bruce Dern - was released two weeks ago, there Liester was at a critical moment in the film, playing a waitress who keeps a cranky Dern honest.
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