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Stereotyping

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1997
This letter is submitted on behalf of teens everywhere. It is also intended for the benefit of Mike Mendiola (letter, March 3) and all others who have the same view of the "American teenagers [who] can't speak even one sentence without using the words 'you know' or 'like' at least five times": same cliche, different generation. My great-grandparents said it of my grandparents and they of my parents and my parents say it of the current generation that soon will be running the country.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
If the gay-themed "Tennessee Queer" came out 20 years ago - or was at least a more deftly made film - perhaps it wouldn't seem so desperately past its sell-by date. But this unevenly acted yuckfest, which is as unsubtle as its title, has all the pizazz of a bad sitcom episode. When Jason Potts (Christian Walker), a New York City librarian living in domestic bliss with his idyllic boyfriend (Jerre Dye), is summoned back to his native Smyth, Tenn., under false pretenses (long story)
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1991
OK, so now we're in a war and we're tempted to slip into our cave-man survival mode: stereotyping. That very mechanism ensured our survival eons ago, but now it is a knee-jerk response that can keep us from achieving lasting peace in the Middle East. We can't have a "new world order," or peace, without setting aside our all-too-human tendency to resort to the prejudicial stereotyping of nations and groups. I plan not to see "Not Without My Daughter." I'd rather not encourage that cave woman buried somewhere in my psyche.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 25, 2014 | By Cindy Chang
Kristina Wong has crashed Miss Chinatown pageants as a pimply, cigar-smoking, over-the-hill contestant. She has posed as a rabid Jeremy Lin fan, waving sexually suggestive signs at the NBA player's games. On a sewing machine in her Koreatown apartment, she makes vagina puppets out of colored felt. So when she found herself in front of television cameras discussing the popularity of Asian women on the dating scene, Wong was in her element. "Suck it, white ladies! I got it!
BUSINESS
November 2, 1997
With regard to AT&T's comment that its account executive's memo about varying ethnic considerations was "offensive" ["AT&T Exec's Memo on Ethnic Sales Tips Pushes Buttons," Sept. 25], shame on both you and them for pandering to those who have nothing better to do than get offended over the most innocuous of comments. You mention the thin line that companies walk between cultural sensitivity and ethnic stereotyping. The solution is really very simple. All it takes is for both companies and the media to have the courage to stop apologizing every time some attention-grabber cries "bias" and instead call for a common-sense recognition of the fact that stereotyping involves saying that all people of a specific group do and/or say something, and a generalization indicates that large numbers of people within the group (not necessarily all)
ENTERTAINMENT
April 28, 2001
Lorenza Munoz poses the question, "What if you woke up one day and every movie portrayed Americans as dumb, dirty and ignorant?" ("The Silver Screen That Divides Us, April 24). I have woken up. And last I checked, movies like "Freddy Got Fingered," "Joe Dirt" and "Tomcats" were only some of the films to choose from that feature Americans with these qualities. And contrary to her assertion of Mexican stereotyping, the popular film "Spy Kids" features a wonderful family model that happens to be Mexican.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 31, 1995
The satirical piece by John M. Glionna ["Stalking the Motivated Seller," Dec. 18] was hardly funny, accurate or self-flattering. It is true, the residential real estate market locally has been battered since late 1989 and prices have dropped steadily in the 1990s. This has caused sellers to fret, Realtors to go broke or go deep into debt, and buyers to pick up bargains. If "Vulture" was a serious home buyer, he would have done the following: 1.: Establish rapport with one agent and have that agent find him the right home for his needs, and 2.: not berate, belittle, or insult those involved in selling homes--including owners and realty agents.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 15, 1993 | Excerpted from a commentary by Art Cribbs, an ordained minister, in the Sentinel, an African-American weekly published Thursdays in Los Angeles
It is one of the most ironic and pathetic trends to hit the black community: Parading the face of Malcolm and sporting "X" as a public symbol of cultural and historic pride while demeaning African daughters and gyrating sexual prowess without taking paternal responsibility for the premature pregnancies that follow. (Gangsta) rappers promote vulgarity and violence against women without restraint.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 1997 | MATEA GOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Local Russian American leaders lambasted the media and law enforcement officials Thursday, accusing them of perpetuating the myth that immigrants from the former Soviet Union are involved in a "Russian Mafia," and arguing that there is no evidence of such a group. Heads of emigre groups criticized media outlets for stereotyping Russians as members of organized crime in the coverage of last week's arrest of Ukrainian-born Mikail Markhasev in the slaying of Ennis Cosby.
NEWS
February 12, 1991 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For as long as there have been movies and popular literature, Arabs have been portrayed in the West as bumbling desert wanderers and wild-eyed fanatics cursed by a love of violence and wealth. They secured a place in the Western media from which other minorities had long since escaped. They were fair game, the one group that political cartoonists and Hollywood directors could denigrate without fear of reprisal. Even "Sesame Street," the respected children's television program, once used an Arab as a symbol of evil.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 16, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
The giddy, broad, candy-colored "G.B.F" takes a sharp and amusing look at what happens when three high school queen bees discover what's missing from their arsenals of cutting-edge cool: a gay best friend, hence "G.B.F. " So when the sweet, tentative and, as one of the quasi-mean girls notes, "not even that fabulous" Tanner (an endearing Michael J. Willett) is outed via a mishap with a guy-on-guy hookup app, the bees swarm. The girls (Sasha Pieterse, Andrea Bowen and Xosha Roquemore)
OPINION
January 5, 2014 | By Becky Aikman
When the Crawley clan of "Downton Abbey" returns to American television this weekend, I will take more than a sporting interest in the fate of the newly widowed Lady Mary. As someone who was widowed at a relatively young age myself, my fondest hope is this: that she will be no lady. Perhaps she can help the rest of us sort out what constitutes proper behavior for a woman whose husband has died. Being a widow is one of the few female roles for which social norms still lag in a bygone era, reinforced by literature and popular culture.
OPINION
December 26, 2013 | By Rosalind C. Barnett and Caryl Rivers
Recent headlines bemoan the fact that, in the city of Los Angeles, only one woman - recently elected to a City Council with 14 men - holds elected office in City Hall. As for L.A. County, with 9.9 million residents, a lone woman sits on its five-member Board of Supervisors. California is not alone. Across the United States, only 73 women hold statewide elected offices - less than a quarter of available positions. That percentage has been declining for 12 years, according to the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Brent Kroeger pores over nasty online comments about stay-at-home dads, wondering if his friends think those things about him. The Rowland Heights father remembers high school classmates laughing when he said he wanted to be a "house husband. " He avoids mentioning it on Facebook. "I don't want other men to look at me like less of a man," Kroeger said. His fears are tied to a bigger phenomenon: The gender revolution has been lopsided. Even as American society has seen sweeping transformations - expanding roles for women, surging tolerance for homosexuality - popular ideas about masculinity seem to have stagnated.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
Defying enduring stereotypes about black fatherhood, a federal survey of American parents shows that by most measures, black fathers who live with their children are just as involved as other dads who live with their kids - or more so. For instance, among fathers who lived with young children, 70% of black dads said they bathed, diapered or dressed those kids every day, compared with 60% of white fathers and 45% of Latino fathers, according to...
ENTERTAINMENT
December 18, 2013 | By Annlee Ellingson
The immigrant smuggler at the center of "Coyote" is hardly a cartel-hardened pollero . Rather, Brian (Robert J. Steinmiller Jr.) is a white, middle-class Angeleno pushing 30 and still living at home. When he loses his job teaching a food-handling course for being too explicit in his descriptions about how bacteria spread, his metalhead Uncle Jimmy (Dennis W. Hall) gives him a gig in construction - as well as dubious life advice. In his new dirty job, Brian's germaphobia is swiftly replaced by a new obsession with his Latino co-workers, who, peddling in stereotypes, include a benevolent gardener working for a better life for his sons and a gangster electrician with a stash of loot left over from the riots.
NEWS
December 12, 2013 | By Susan Denley
Karl Lagerfeld is raising eyebrows among some critics for using feathered headdresses and warpaint-like golden makeup during Chanel's "Metier d'Art" show in Dallas on Tuesday. He also drew on other Western stereotypes -- cowboys, ranchers -- but the use of Native American stereotypes in fashion has been controversial. [The Cut] Actress Gwyneth Paltrow and fitness guru Tracy Anderson, who recently launched a web series together called "The Restart Project," are developing a television series on love and weight loss, Anderson says.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NORFOLK, Neb. - One night last year, Rachel Liester was waitressing at a restaurant near this rural town when she received an unusual request. A director was preparing to shoot a movie nearby, and her ticking off of the specials made her sufficiently camera-ready to merit an audition. Soon after, Liester was reading for the director, who turned out to be Oscar winner Alexander Payne. And when Payne's "Nebraska" - a coming-home father-son dramedy starring Will Forte and Bruce Dern - was released two weeks ago, there Liester was at a critical moment in the film, playing a waitress who keeps a cranky Dern honest.
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