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Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce

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NEWS
June 20, 2011 | By Patrick Kevin Day, Los Angeles Times
It's long been said that there are no new ideas in Hollywood. But we have to admit that there have been some pretty good new incarnations of the old ones. Here we trace the possible genetic forebears of AMC's "Mad Men. " PREMISE "Mad Men": A poor Korean war soldier reinvents himself as a suave ad executive and family man and confronts the increasingly complicated sexual politics of the 1960s. "thirtysomething": Peace-loving hippies of the 1960s reinvent themselves as ad executives and family men and confront the increasingly complicated sexual politics of the 1980s.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
One of the quieter developments in Sunday's "Mad Men" was the introduction of a funky new logo for Sterling Cooper & Partners, the hybrid agency formed earlier this season with the merger of Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce and Cutler Gleason Chaough. Given how much was going on in the episode -- Sally's boarding school misadventures, Ken getting shot, Pete confronting Bob, and Don impersonating a baby -- one could be forgiven for missing the logo, which made its television debut during a heated confrontation between Don and Ted. Thankfully, the publicity team at Sterling Cooper -- uh, we mean AMC -- sent out a press release announcing the new branding efforts after the episode aired.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 20, 2013 | By Meredith Blake
One of the quieter developments in Sunday's "Mad Men" was the introduction of a funky new logo for Sterling Cooper & Partners, the hybrid agency formed earlier this season with the merger of Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce and Cutler Gleason Chaough. Given how much was going on in the episode -- Sally's boarding school misadventures, Ken getting shot, Pete confronting Bob, and Don impersonating a baby -- one could be forgiven for missing the logo, which made its television debut during a heated confrontation between Don and Ted. Thankfully, the publicity team at Sterling Cooper -- uh, we mean AMC -- sent out a press release announcing the new branding efforts after the episode aired.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Here's how I am afraid "Mad Men" will end next year: With Jon Hamm's Don Draper in a white suit, heading to Studio 54. Here's how I hope it will end: The whole series is revealed to be a story told by Roger Sterling (John Slattery) in a Ventura County sweat lodge. It may seem morbid to contemplate the demise of a show that has so inarguably changed the nature of television for the better. Just when we seemed doomed to death by reality programming, AMC's "Mad Men" proved that smart, stylish television could drive the cultural conversation as effectively as any Kardashian.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2012
It's been a while since we visited with these old friends. Where did we leave off things? Mad Men The winds of change are blowing cigarette smoke in Don Draper's face. When we left in 1965, Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce was struggling. Joan had decided not to abort Roger's baby. Torn between two lovers, Don chose sweet, young secretary Megan rather than smart, modern Dr. Faye. Betty snapped (a little more than usual) and fired beloved housekeeper Carla, nailing her spot in the "nastiest TV moms of 2011" pantheon.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2010 | By Meredith Blake
A boy, dressed up as a cowboy, sits under a dining room table, clutching the rods of a chair like bars on a prison cell. "Let me outta here! Let me outta here!" he screams. It's a scene from fictional adman Don Draper's most acclaimed commercial, and though it may just be a spot for a floor wax, viewers of "Mad Men" know that it symbolizes much more. The show, which ends its fourth season Sunday, has repeatedly used enclosed spaces ? elevators, closets, back seats ? to reinforce the themes of secrecy, repression and isolation that are central to the show.
NEWS
June 16, 2011 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Sitting poolside with Elisabeth Moss, who's wearing a white summer dress, her brown hair wet and combed back and looking "cute as hell" (as Don Draper memorably described her character, Peggy Olson, on "Mad Men"), it's pretty easy to picture the day Moss walked into show creator Matt Weiner's office five years ago to read for the show. "It was the very first day of auditions," Weiner remembers, "and she was the second person to read. Not just for Peggy, but for the show, period. Someone came in to read for Don. I did not like him. And then she came in, and she was so young, wearing this ingénue dress, with her hair long and straight.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2013 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Here's how I am afraid "Mad Men" will end next year: With Jon Hamm's Don Draper in a white suit, heading to Studio 54. Here's how I hope it will end: The whole series is revealed to be a story told by Roger Sterling (John Slattery) in a Ventura County sweat lodge. It may seem morbid to contemplate the demise of a show that has so inarguably changed the nature of television for the better. Just when we seemed doomed to death by reality programming, AMC's "Mad Men" proved that smart, stylish television could drive the cultural conversation as effectively as any Kardashian.
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Does she or doesn't she?" - the innuendo-filled catchphrase for Clairol from 1956 easily could have been conceived by "Mad Men's" Don Draper. It was not, of course, but rather was penned by one of the few female copywriters of her day. Jane Maas, also a pioneer in the nearly all-male world of advertising decades ago, pays homage to the hair color campaign by Shirley Polykoff in her new book, "Mad Women: The Other Side of Life on Madison Avenue...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
After 17 months, "Mad Men" returns to AMC, television and the universe Sunday night. I have seen the fifth season's two-hour opening episode. There is a party in it. I can say no more. Well, I could say more. But you may have read of a memo that "Mad Men" creator and caretaker Matthew Weiner sent out to critics everywhere asking that, in order not to spoil any viewer's fun, we keep secret "key storylines" as developed in the season premiere. Specifically, he would prefer we not mention: the year it takes place; Don Draper's relationship status; whether Joan had her baby (I'd forgotten that she was pregnant, it's been so long)
NEWS
March 23, 2012 | By Liesl Bradner, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Does she or doesn't she?" - the innuendo-filled catchphrase for Clairol from 1956 easily could have been conceived by "Mad Men's" Don Draper. It was not, of course, but rather was penned by one of the few female copywriters of her day. Jane Maas, also a pioneer in the nearly all-male world of advertising decades ago, pays homage to the hair color campaign by Shirley Polykoff in her new book, "Mad Women: The Other Side of Life on Madison Avenue...
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 2012 | By Robert Lloyd, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
After 17 months, "Mad Men" returns to AMC, television and the universe Sunday night. I have seen the fifth season's two-hour opening episode. There is a party in it. I can say no more. Well, I could say more. But you may have read of a memo that "Mad Men" creator and caretaker Matthew Weiner sent out to critics everywhere asking that, in order not to spoil any viewer's fun, we keep secret "key storylines" as developed in the season premiere. Specifically, he would prefer we not mention: the year it takes place; Don Draper's relationship status; whether Joan had her baby (I'd forgotten that she was pregnant, it's been so long)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 8, 2012
It's been a while since we visited with these old friends. Where did we leave off things? Mad Men The winds of change are blowing cigarette smoke in Don Draper's face. When we left in 1965, Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce was struggling. Joan had decided not to abort Roger's baby. Torn between two lovers, Don chose sweet, young secretary Megan rather than smart, modern Dr. Faye. Betty snapped (a little more than usual) and fired beloved housekeeper Carla, nailing her spot in the "nastiest TV moms of 2011" pantheon.
NEWS
June 20, 2011 | By Patrick Kevin Day, Los Angeles Times
It's long been said that there are no new ideas in Hollywood. But we have to admit that there have been some pretty good new incarnations of the old ones. Here we trace the possible genetic forebears of AMC's "Mad Men. " PREMISE "Mad Men": A poor Korean war soldier reinvents himself as a suave ad executive and family man and confronts the increasingly complicated sexual politics of the 1960s. "thirtysomething": Peace-loving hippies of the 1960s reinvent themselves as ad executives and family men and confront the increasingly complicated sexual politics of the 1980s.
NEWS
June 16, 2011 | By Glenn Whipp, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Sitting poolside with Elisabeth Moss, who's wearing a white summer dress, her brown hair wet and combed back and looking "cute as hell" (as Don Draper memorably described her character, Peggy Olson, on "Mad Men"), it's pretty easy to picture the day Moss walked into show creator Matt Weiner's office five years ago to read for the show. "It was the very first day of auditions," Weiner remembers, "and she was the second person to read. Not just for Peggy, but for the show, period. Someone came in to read for Don. I did not like him. And then she came in, and she was so young, wearing this ingénue dress, with her hair long and straight.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2011 | Melissa Maerz
The future of television lies squarely in the past, preferably on a bed with a blond bombshell. That's where you'll find Nick, the hero of NBC's upcoming 1960s drama "The Playboy Club," who's described by one lady friend as "everything you want and everything you don't. " With his well-oiled hair and sharply creased pocket square, he looks like he just stepped out of an ad designed by Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce. Surrounded by a gaggle of pink-eared, cotton-tailed friends, Nick lives in a world where, as Hugh Hefner's voice-over explains, "everything was perfect, where life was magic, where ... fantasies became realities for everyone who walked through the door.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2011 | Melissa Maerz
The future of television lies squarely in the past, preferably on a bed with a blond bombshell. That's where you'll find Nick, the hero of NBC's upcoming 1960s drama "The Playboy Club," who's described by one lady friend as "everything you want and everything you don't. " With his well-oiled hair and sharply creased pocket square, he looks like he just stepped out of an ad designed by Sterling Cooper Draper Pryce. Surrounded by a gaggle of pink-eared, cotton-tailed friends, Nick lives in a world where, as Hugh Hefner's voice-over explains, "everything was perfect, where life was magic, where ... fantasies became realities for everyone who walked through the door.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 23, 2010 | MARY McNAMARA, TELEVISION CRITIC
It's easy to read a lot into "Mad Men" ( see accompanying piece ). The languid pace, the mouth-watering attention to detail, the archetypal characters and well-crafted dialogue conspire to create the air of a television classic begging to be deconstructed. Is it a personal journey in which our hero, Don Draper ( Jon Hamm), scours the cityscapes and deserts in search of meaning? Or is he the lens through which creator Matthew Weiner offers his interpretation of the socio-political shifts of the 1960s?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 16, 2010 | By Meredith Blake
A boy, dressed up as a cowboy, sits under a dining room table, clutching the rods of a chair like bars on a prison cell. "Let me outta here! Let me outta here!" he screams. It's a scene from fictional adman Don Draper's most acclaimed commercial, and though it may just be a spot for a floor wax, viewers of "Mad Men" know that it symbolizes much more. The show, which ends its fourth season Sunday, has repeatedly used enclosed spaces ? elevators, closets, back seats ? to reinforce the themes of secrecy, repression and isolation that are central to the show.
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