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Sterling Norris

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1992
Making a choice in the heated race for district attorney of Los Angeles is not an easy call for voters. The embattled two-term incumbent, Ira Reiner, is not as bad a prosecutor as his worst critics contend, and none of his four opponents has yet broken out of the pack. The call for "anyone-but-Reiner," while increasingly heard, is not by itself a sound basis on which to choose a D.A.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
May 31, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a time not long ago when Ira Reiner had seemingly limitless political potential. Photogenic and articulate, with his familiar mop of white hair and trademark baritone voice, the district attorney of Los Angeles County appeared destined for the attorney general's chair, maybe even the governor's mansion.
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OPINION
May 31, 1992
In your endorsement for Los Angeles County district attorney (editorial, May 26), you state that "the post is arguably the most powerful in Los Angeles County." If the race is that serious, shouldn't your coverage of its candidates have been? You admit that Ira Reiner cannot make an "open and shut" case for his reelection. Then you go on to dismiss Howard Johnson with three words, "lacks sufficient experience"; discard Robert Tanenbaum because of "tendencies" toward abrasiveness; praise Gil Garcetti for "thoughtful stands on many issues," then nix him with character assassination by innuendo; and wind up with Sterling Norris, with whom you disagree with on several major issues and who you seem to hope will be able to administrate.
OPINION
May 31, 1992
In your endorsement for Los Angeles County district attorney (editorial, May 26), you state that "the post is arguably the most powerful in Los Angeles County." If the race is that serious, shouldn't your coverage of its candidates have been? You admit that Ira Reiner cannot make an "open and shut" case for his reelection. Then you go on to dismiss Howard Johnson with three words, "lacks sufficient experience"; discard Robert Tanenbaum because of "tendencies" toward abrasiveness; praise Gil Garcetti for "thoughtful stands on many issues," then nix him with character assassination by innuendo; and wind up with Sterling Norris, with whom you disagree with on several major issues and who you seem to hope will be able to administrate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1992 | BILL BOYARSKY
In the first debate of his reelection campaign, Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner treated his opponents with a condescension that verged on contempt. "I'm sorry, I forgot your name," Reiner told Beverly Hills City Councilman Bob Tanenbaum midway into the Mexican-American Bar Assn. debate last Thursday night. He was just as disrespectful to two of his subordinates who are running against him. Whenever head Deputy D.A. Gil Garcetti and Deputy D.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner, dipping into a well of support in the black community, Thursday night lambasted his campaign challengers for engaging in "the politics of silence" by failing to speak out against a judge who sentenced a Korean-born grocer to probation in the killing of a black girl. Reiner made his remarks during a debate before an audience of black lawyers who appeared to respond favorably to his continuing denunciations of the sentence that Superior Court Judge Joyce A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner debated his campaign challengers for the first time Thursday night, defending his performance on a wide range of fronts, from his alleged failure to prosecute police officers who allegedly use excessive force to his controversial attack on a judge who handled a racially charged trial. The two-hour debate marked the first time that the eight-year incumbent district attorney has responded directly to criticism from his opponents.
NEWS
May 31, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a time not long ago when Ira Reiner had seemingly limitless political potential. Photogenic and articulate, with his familiar mop of white hair and trademark baritone voice, the district attorney of Los Angeles County appeared destined for the attorney general's chair, maybe even the governor's mansion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 24, 1985 | PAUL FELDMAN, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles gang member was convicted Thursday of four counts of first-degree murder in the mistaken-identity shootings of four relatives of retired professional football star Kermit Alexander. Horace Burns, 20, sat motionless as the jury--which must next decide whether Burns receives the death penalty or life in prison without possibility of parole--announced its verdict to Los Angeles Superior Court Judge Aurelio Munoz.
MAGAZINE
August 2, 1987 | PAUL CIOTTI, Paul Ciotti is a Los Angeles Times Magazine staff writer
KERMIT ALEXANDER is upset. He's too much of a gentleman to be blunt about it. But sitting in his second-story Westwood office, the emotion rumbles out of him like some volcanic aftershock. In person, Alexander makes a formidable impression. Although he's retired from professional football, his biceps bulge like cast-iron drainpipes under his plaid shirt. Sitting behind his desk, he comes across as a strong, masculine presence, a leader, and someone, one senses, not to be lightly crossed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1992
Making a choice in the heated race for district attorney of Los Angeles is not an easy call for voters. The embattled two-term incumbent, Ira Reiner, is not as bad a prosecutor as his worst critics contend, and none of his four opponents has yet broken out of the pack. The call for "anyone-but-Reiner," while increasingly heard, is not by itself a sound basis on which to choose a D.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner, dipping into a well of support in the black community, Thursday night lambasted his campaign challengers for engaging in "the politics of silence" by failing to speak out against a judge who sentenced a Korean-born grocer to probation in the killing of a black girl. Reiner made his remarks during a debate before an audience of black lawyers who appeared to respond favorably to his continuing denunciations of the sentence that Superior Court Judge Joyce A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1992 | BILL BOYARSKY
In the first debate of his reelection campaign, Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner treated his opponents with a condescension that verged on contempt. "I'm sorry, I forgot your name," Reiner told Beverly Hills City Councilman Bob Tanenbaum midway into the Mexican-American Bar Assn. debate last Thursday night. He was just as disrespectful to two of his subordinates who are running against him. Whenever head Deputy D.A. Gil Garcetti and Deputy D.A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 27, 1992 | SHERYL STOLBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles County Dist. Atty. Ira Reiner debated his campaign challengers for the first time Thursday night, defending his performance on a wide range of fronts, from his alleged failure to prosecute police officers who allegedly use excessive force to his controversial attack on a judge who handled a racially charged trial. The two-hour debate marked the first time that the eight-year incumbent district attorney has responded directly to criticism from his opponents.
NEWS
February 18, 1986
A Los Angeles Superior Court jury today recommended the death sentence for a gang member described as the trigger man in the 1984 "wrong address" execution-style murders of the mother of former football star Kermit Alexander and three other relatives. Members of the Alexander family burst into screams and sobs as the verdict against Tiequon Audray Cox, 19, was read. Deputy Dist. Atty. Sterling Norris said the family was "very pleased" with the verdict. Judge Roger W.
NEWS
June 5, 1985
A former Los Angeles County Jail cellmate of Horace Burns, the convicted killer of four relatives of former football star Kermit Alexander, testified that Burns offered him $15,000 to kill the prosecutor and two witnesses in the case. Philip Lowden, a convicted robber, also said Burns, 20, offered him additional money to kill several of the jurors who convicted him.
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