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Sterling Sharpe

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SPORTS
July 30, 1988
Wide receiver Sterling Sharpe, the Green Bay Packers' No. 1 draft choice, signed a contract after having held out for 12 days of training camp.
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SPORTS
January 23, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY
"Not right now," Sterling Sharpe says. "Can't." He darts off. Good quickness, for a football player who hasn't played since 1994. Sharpe slips up behind a Green Bay Packer, who is doing a TV interview. He nuzzles the Packer's shoulder blade with his cheek. The player cranes his neck to see who it is. "You," he says. Oh, that Sterling. What a scamp. He slips away again. A Milwaukeean with a mike makes a move in his direction. "Sterling . . . ?" "Can't," he says. "Sorry. Can't." No time.
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SPORTS
December 29, 1992 | From Staff and Wire Reports
San Francisco quarterback Steve Young and Green Bay wide receiver Sterling Sharpe were the leading vote-getters for the Associated Press All-Pro team. Young, in his first season as the unchallenged regular quarterback for the 49ers, received 78 of 80 votes cast by a national media panel. Sharpe, who broke Art Monk's NFL mark with 108 receptions, got 76 votes. The leading vote-getter on defense was Seattle tackle Cortez Kennedy, named on 71 ballots.
SPORTS
July 28, 1995 | Associated Press
Denver Bronco tight end Shannon Sharpe said he might retire after the 1995 season if his chronic ankle and knee pain do not subside. "It's not a matter of how much longer I want to play--it's how much more can my body take," Sharpe said. "I'm only 27, but look at what I've gone through. My body feels like I'm 40. That's not good." During the off-season, Sharpe underwent surgery on both ankles. "This year is a real key.
SPORTS
September 4, 1994 | Associated Press
Sterling Sharpe staged one of the shortest walkouts in NFL history Saturday, leaving the team early in the day and then changing his mind hours later. Sharpe, the NFL's leading wide receiver the last two years, initially said he would sit out the season because he is dissatisfied with his present contract. But he changed his mind a short while later and said he would play today in the season-opener against Minnesota.
SPORTS
January 23, 1998 | MIKE DOWNEY
"Not right now," Sterling Sharpe says. "Can't." He darts off. Good quickness, for a football player who hasn't played since 1994. Sharpe slips up behind a Green Bay Packer, who is doing a TV interview. He nuzzles the Packer's shoulder blade with his cheek. The player cranes his neck to see who it is. "You," he says. Oh, that Sterling. What a scamp. He slips away again. A Milwaukeean with a mike makes a move in his direction. "Sterling . . . ?" "Can't," he says. "Sorry. Can't." No time.
SPORTS
July 28, 1995 | Associated Press
Denver Bronco tight end Shannon Sharpe said he might retire after the 1995 season if his chronic ankle and knee pain do not subside. "It's not a matter of how much longer I want to play--it's how much more can my body take," Sharpe said. "I'm only 27, but look at what I've gone through. My body feels like I'm 40. That's not good." During the off-season, Sharpe underwent surgery on both ankles. "This year is a real key.
SPORTS
January 7, 1995 | Associated Press
Sterling Sharpe, sidelined because of a neck problem that could end his career, would collect between $3 million and $3.5 million from an insurance policy if he is unable to play again, a newspaper reported Friday. The long-term disability policy pays off if the Green Bay Packer wide receiver proves that football-related injuries ended his career, The Milwaukee Journal said. The newspaper said it's believed that Sharpe, not the team, bought the policy.
SPORTS
March 1, 1995 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Sterling Sharpe, one of the NFL's premier receivers, was released by the Green Bay Packers on Tuesday, less than a month after his spinal surgery. The four-time all-pro was operated on Feb. 3 for a neck problem that kept him out of Green Bay's two playoff games and will sideline him for all of 1995. His physician said there is a 90% chance of Sharpe's playing in 1996. Sharpe, 29, has spent seven years with the Packers and is the team's all-time leader in receptions.
SPORTS
November 15, 1993 | From Associated Press
Sterling Sharpe, who was suffering from double vision, saw straight at the right time. The Green Bay receiver caught a Brett Favre pass for 54 yards to set up Chris Jacke's 36-yard field goal with three seconds remaining as the Packers pulled out a 19-17 victory over the New Orleans Saints Sunday. "Don't ask me how Sterling got through the seam," Saint cornerback Toi Cook said. "But he did and it was a real heart-buster."
SPORTS
May 3, 1995 | From Staff and Wire Reports
The Green Bay Packers said Tuesday they will seek immediate dismissal of a $9.6-million lawsuit filed by former star receiver Sterling Sharpe, saying they will pursue a resolution through the NFL's grievance system. In a suit filed Monday in U.S. District Court in Tampa, Fla., where Sharpe played his last game, he named the Packers, the NFL Management Council and the NFL Players Assn., claiming the grievance system denied him due process. He was released Feb.
SPORTS
March 1, 1995 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Sterling Sharpe, one of the NFL's premier receivers, was released by the Green Bay Packers on Tuesday, less than a month after his spinal surgery. The four-time all-pro was operated on Feb. 3 for a neck problem that kept him out of Green Bay's two playoff games and will sideline him for all of 1995. His physician said there is a 90% chance of Sharpe's playing in 1996. Sharpe, 29, has spent seven years with the Packers and is the team's all-time leader in receptions.
SPORTS
January 7, 1995 | Associated Press
Sterling Sharpe, sidelined because of a neck problem that could end his career, would collect between $3 million and $3.5 million from an insurance policy if he is unable to play again, a newspaper reported Friday. The long-term disability policy pays off if the Green Bay Packer wide receiver proves that football-related injuries ended his career, The Milwaukee Journal said. The newspaper said it's believed that Sharpe, not the team, bought the policy.
SPORTS
December 31, 1994 | BILL PLASCHKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Across Lake Michigan and the state of Michigan, above a corner locker in the Pontiac Silverdome, hangs a wrinkled, discolored sign. It was written by Detroit linebacker Chris Spielman two days after the end of the Lions' 1993 season. Even after nearly 12 months, the hand-written message flickers with anger: "Final: Green Bay 28, Detroit 24. Playoffs. Out!!!" Spielman was writing about last year's first-round game against the Packers.
SPORTS
December 29, 1994 | From Associated Press
The Green Bay Packers spent the exhibition season learning how to play without injury-prone Pro Bowl receiver Sterling Sharpe. Now they will have to use that knowledge in the playoffs--and maybe beyond. Sharpe has a neck abnormality that will require surgery and could end his career, team physician Patrick McKenzie announced Wednesday. Sharpe sustained "stinger" nerve injuries in each of the last two games, sinking to the turf in excruciating pain with numbness and then tingling in his limbs.
SPORTS
November 20, 1994 | RON LESKO, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Cris Carter tells you he might join the seminary after football, and you don't know what to make of him. He is serious, it seems, but it can be hard to tell with Carter sometimes. Like when he was in Philadelphia. He said he was serious about football, but it was never very easy to be sure. There were times he seemed more interested in carousing until early Sunday morning than playing on Sunday afternoon. Buddy Ryan didn't like it, and he let Carter know.
SPORTS
July 29, 1994 | MIKE REILLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Israel has studied the Rams' schedule. He knows they are out there . . . waiting. * Andre Rison. Sterling Sharpe. Jerry Rice. All are just waiting for their shot at Israel, the Rams' cornerback who has started only 13 games in his three-year pro career and has yet to intercept a pass. But Israel just shrugs and asks: "What more could a young cornerback want? Andre Rison, Sterling Sharpe, Jerry Rice. I love it. Each one of those guys will make me a better player.
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