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June 11, 1990 | From United Press International
Screenwriter Sued Over Cook Plot: United National Pictures sued Stirling Silliphant and Stirling Silliphant Productions on Wednesday, claiming that the screenwriter agreed to write a six-hour miniseries on the life of Captain James Cook, then failed to deliver it by Jan. 1 as promised. Silliphant never signed the written contract agreeing to do the job but accepted a $50,000 advance, the suit says.
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BUSINESS
June 11, 1990 | From United Press International
Screenwriter Sued Over Cook Plot: United National Pictures sued Stirling Silliphant and Stirling Silliphant Productions on Wednesday, claiming that the screenwriter agreed to write a six-hour miniseries on the life of Captain James Cook, then failed to deliver it by Jan. 1 as promised. Silliphant never signed the written contract agreeing to do the job but accepted a $50,000 advance, the suit says.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 8, 2001
Richard Martin Stern, 86, an award-winning author whose book "The Tower" was a basis for the 1974 movie "The Towering Inferno," died Oct. 31 at his home in Santa Fe, N.M. Born in Fresno, a fourth-generation Californian, Stern attended Harvard and lived in New York City, where he began writing short stories for Colliers and the Saturday Evening Post. His first book, "The Bright Road to Fear" in 1958, won the Edgar Award in 1959 for best first novel.
NEWS
April 18, 1985 | JODY JACOBS
Helen Rose, the two-time Oscar-winning movie designer (for "The Bad and the Beautiful" and "I'll Cry Tomorrow") who left the glitter of Hollywood a few years ago to enjoy a more relaxed life style in Palm Springs, will be back in town May 3. That's the night the Otis Art Institute of Parsons School of Design honors Miss Rose for her "contributions to costume and fashion design."
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1987 | ANNETTE INSDORF, Insdorf is director and professor of film studies at Columbia University
In Francois Truffaut's "Story of Adele H.," the object of Isabelle Adjani's obsession was the young British Lt. Pinson, a cool heart-breaker played by Bruce Robinson. The actor disappeared from the screen after this film, but not from the cinema: A decade later, it was the same Bruce Robinson who was nominated for an Academy Award for his screenplay of "The Killing Fields."
TRAVEL
May 10, 1998 | PHIL DORAN, Doran, a writer formerly based in Los Angeles, currently lives in London
It is Chinese New Year in Bangkok. The evening sky is ablaze with fireworks, and in the streets giant paper dragons roar at each other in ritual combat. The entire population of the city, it seems, has poured into the narrow streets of old Chinatown, creating a crush so dense it can barely move. From a thousand sidewalk grills and woks waft the aromas of grilled fish, steamed dumplings and stir-fried noodles as Chinese rock 'n' roll blares from a hundred loudspeakers.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 1989 | JACK MATHEWS, Times Staff Writer
J. B. Mackey, a 48-year-old drifter who felt he had a lot of stories to tell, was living off the aluminum cans and junk iron he picked up along the road in west Texas when he heard about it. Tom Homans, a 24-year-old college graduate who had hoped to write the definitive treatise on Western religion, was counting engine parts in a Baltimore warehouse when he heard about it. Months after they heard about it, it had changed their lives.
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