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Steve Alten

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NEWS
October 21, 1996 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two words: Jurassic shark. In high-concept Hollywood-speak, that is all you need to know about the plot of the first novel ever written by 37-year-old Steve Alten, a family man who had $48 in the bank when he lost his job last month in a wholesale meat plant. And here's all you need to know about Alten today, after Walt Disney Pictures and Bantam-Doubleday-Dell bought his high concept and 400 pages of manuscript for more than $3 million: rich.
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BOOKS
August 3, 1997
To the Editor: I am a true fan of Celeste Fremon's big-hearted, socially responsible work, and her review of my novel, "Locas," (Book Review, June 15) piqued my interest on a couple of different levels. First, her critique of the presentation of the novel--in particular, the copy on the jacket flap that announces that it is a "pirate radio broadcast straight from the urban core"--is well taken. Although I did not write that copy, I am responsible for it, and I now wish that it had been omitted because the novel is a work of imagination and is no way intended as (nor could it be)
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BOOKS
August 3, 1997
To the Editor: As a first-time novelist, I have been forewarned to ignore the good, the bad and the ugly when it comes time for critics to review my work. I do not write to please literary critics; I write to please readers who just want to enjoy the act of escaping in an action-packed commercial novel. But after reading Ellis' castigation of "Meg" (Book Review, July 20), I felt a response was in order. Ellis, who authored "The Great White Shark," vehemently attacks everything from the title of the book to my research, which depicts "sharks and whales behaving like unknown animals from the planet Zargon.
BOOKS
July 20, 1997 | RICHARD ELLIS, Richard Ellis is the author of "Deep Atlantic," "Monsters of the Sea," "The Book of Whales," "Dolphins and Porpoises," "The Book of Sharkes," "Men and Whales" and "Great White Shark" with John McCosker
Ever since the 1974 publication of the blockbuster novel "Jaws" and the hugely successful movie directed by Steven Spielberg, authors have tried to improve on Peter Benchley's formula for success. If a 25-foot great white shark could generate all that money, think of what a 100-footer could do! Or a 200-footer!
BOOKS
July 20, 1997 | RICHARD ELLIS, Richard Ellis is the author of "Deep Atlantic," "Monsters of the Sea," "The Book of Whales," "Dolphins and Porpoises," "The Book of Sharkes," "Men and Whales" and "Great White Shark" with John McCosker
Ever since the 1974 publication of the blockbuster novel "Jaws" and the hugely successful movie directed by Steven Spielberg, authors have tried to improve on Peter Benchley's formula for success. If a 25-foot great white shark could generate all that money, think of what a 100-footer could do! Or a 200-footer!
ENTERTAINMENT
April 13, 2008 | Robert W. Welkos, Special to The Times
THE scene opens with a herd of duckbill dinosaurs gorging on kelp. A Tyrannosaurus rex, towering 22 feet, suddenly appears, unleashing a blood curdling roar as its prey scatter, but one duckbill dinosaur remains trapped in the water. The T-Rex crashes through the surf and ruthlessly rips him from the sea. It suddenly stops -- sensing a powerful presence in the water. Its red reptilian eyes, glowing like lasers, scan the ocean.
NEWS
July 12, 1998 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the editor of one of America's most prestigious magazines abruptly quit her job last week for a Hollywood mega-deal, some critics groused that the New York literary world--proud and steeped in tradition--had been sullied. But the encroachment of West Coast movie-making on East Coast publishing is a phenomenon that grows more pronounced each year, and Tina Brown's much-ballyhooed defection from the New Yorker to Miramax is only one of the most startling examples.
NEWS
July 8, 1997 | JOSH GETLIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The shark scenes, though powerful at first, get repetitive. --Doubleday Editor Tom Congdon, critiquing a first novel in 1972 * It sounds like one of the worst judgment calls in publishing history. But as he worked on the manuscript by a young writer 25 years ago, Congdon was eerily prophetic.
NEWS
October 21, 1996 | MIKE CLARY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Two words: Jurassic shark. In high-concept Hollywood-speak, that is all you need to know about the plot of the first novel ever written by 37-year-old Steve Alten, a family man who had $48 in the bank when he lost his job last month in a wholesale meat plant. And here's all you need to know about Alten today, after Walt Disney Pictures and Bantam-Doubleday-Dell bought his high concept and 400 pages of manuscript for more than $3 million: rich.
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