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Steve Appleford

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ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2003
Blindsided Is there something we don't know about the relationship between Steve Appleford and Third Eye Blind frontman Stephan Jenkins (Quick Spins, June 1)? What was the point of Appleford's review of Third Eye Blind's latest album, "Out of the Vein"? It was long on dismissive sarcasm about Jenkins and short on anything that might support his claim that the album consists of Jenkins' "whining about all those Hollywood parties he's forced to attend." I have this album and can find no evidence of this "whining."
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2003
Blindsided Is there something we don't know about the relationship between Steve Appleford and Third Eye Blind frontman Stephan Jenkins (Quick Spins, June 1)? What was the point of Appleford's review of Third Eye Blind's latest album, "Out of the Vein"? It was long on dismissive sarcasm about Jenkins and short on anything that might support his claim that the album consists of Jenkins' "whining about all those Hollywood parties he's forced to attend." I have this album and can find no evidence of this "whining."
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 1998
To a "sophisticated reviewer" like Steve Appleford, perhaps the recent Mannheim Steamroller performance at the Arrowhead Pond was a concert with "little to challenge the ears" and "perfectly nice, but still perfectly forgettable" ("Mannheim Steamroller's Christmas Offering: a Snow Job," Dec. 10.) The fact that this group and Chip Davis, their leader, have sold 18 million Christmas albums says much for his popularity level among many music lovers. Must each concert and group be a mind-blowing and/or incredible musical experience to satisfy the music reviewer?
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2000
Was Steve Appleford even at Spaceland on Saturday night ("No Birthday Boy, but a Heck of a Good Party," April 24)? It's hard to believe that a professional rock critic sent by a major newspaper to review a show dedicated to Iggy Pop would be unable to recognize the at least seven Iggy Pop and Stooges covers were performed throughout the evening. He really takes the cake, though, when he states that "Texas Terri didn't perform any Pop covers either." If I recall correctly, her set that night contained three Stooges covers.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 6, 1996
A dismal review of a Rush album is a given, especially from the L.A. Times (Record Rack, Sept. 29). However, a band that has consistently produced gold albums and sold out arena concerts for the past 20 years, despite reviews like Steve Appleford's, warrants a little more coverage than an "In Brief" review. There is a legitimate place for Rush in today's music. In fact, Rush is a true alternative band for those seeking something thoughtful and well-crafted, and not simply attitude, from their music.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 2002
It is great to see O.A.R. get some positive media attention in a major market ("Starting a Revolution," by Steve Appleford, Feb. 7). The band is a true flashback to the great days of rock, where touring 200 days a year and playing in front of friends were as much fun as they were business. O.A.R. has bucked all the trends of modern music and relied on the one thing that no producer or recording can give them: talent. And by allowing their shows to be recorded, their talent is being recognized across the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1998
I can't understand why Steve Appleford takes a negative position against Jethro Tull ("Living in the Past" review of Aug. 29); a band that has endured over 30 years. I can count on one hand how many bands that have lasted that long. My wife and I attended the concert on Aug. 29, and yes, we're part of the 500-plus crowd that was over 40. Reading Appleford's story, I'm wondering at what point will we not be let into a concert due to our age. I found that the members of Jethro Tull had aged, and yes, Ian Anderson had lost some hair but still could produce a high-energy, quality concert.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 24, 2009
Where you've seen him Tom Waits had small parts in films such as "Rumble Fish" and "The Cotton Club" before he got his first major role in 1986 as a jailhouse escapee in director Jim Jarmusch's "Down by Law." He spectacularly embodied the demented Renfield in Francis Ford Coppola's lavish 1992 feature, "Bram Stoker's Dracula"; the following year he starred opposite Lily Tomlin in Robert Altman's adaptation of Raymond Carver tales "Short Cuts" and, more recently, he earned critical raves as a streetwise guru in the 2006 dark comedy "Wristcutters: A Love Story."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 17, 2000
The Baby Namboos, "Ancoast 2 Zambia," Durban Poison/Palm Pictures. The English collective rides dark layers of modern rhythm and the sultry vocals of Aurora Borealis. Hypnotic and memorable. (Steve Appleford) D'Angelo, "Voodoo," Virgin. The singer's artistic stamp may be fuzzy in places, but the generally stylish and seductive music in the long-awaited follow-up to "Brown Sugar," his 1995 debut, is the mark of a commanding young artist.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2006 | Steve Appleford
The Yeah Yeah Yeahs "Show Your Bones" (Interscope) * * * 1/2 Karen O doesn't need your kicks. She's in search of something more -- a wailing, shrieking, panting, purring romantic as likely to slow down for a bit of raw emotional truth as explode right off the stage.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 22, 1998
In the wrong hands, even sentiments about love and freedom can be meaningless platitudes--it's an easy formula for too many reggae artists. But if veteran singer Jimmy Cliff had few new tricks to offer on Tuesday at the House of Blues, his idealistic preaching was never less than genuine. High-stepping and twirling to the beat in a rust-colored suit, Cliff demonstrated himself to be a still-vibrant survivor from reggae's classic era.
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