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ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Seriously, y'all, let's try to settle this: When did Dolph Lundgren become so cool? In the last few years, he has gone from some sort of where-are-they-now punch line to the B-grade action movie's answer to Cary Grant. Forget how he looks with a rocket launcher, have you seen him rock a pocket square? After having come across as the suave one amid the hard-core macho puffery of the "Expendables" pictures as well as diving into the psychotropic madness of "Universal Soldier: Day of Reckoning," with "The Package," Lundgren continues his recent streak of making the most of small roles, elevating each movie in the process.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 15, 2013 | By Mark Olsen
Seriously, y'all, let's try to settle this: When did Dolph Lundgren become so cool? In the last few years, he has gone from some sort of where-are-they-now punch line to the B-grade action movie's answer to Cary Grant. Forget how he looks with a rocket launcher, have you seen him rock a pocket square? After having come across as the suave one amid the hard-core macho puffery of the "Expendables" pictures as well as diving into the psychotropic madness of "Universal Soldier: Day of Reckoning," with "The Package," Lundgren continues his recent streak of making the most of small roles, elevating each movie in the process.
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NEWS
August 29, 2000 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Duncan North says it all began 20 years ago in a Georgetown fern bar. He and his companions, 16-year-olds with fake IDs, were on the make. While the others were tall, athletic and handsome, however, North was an overweight student of Eastern philosophy who yearned to be cool. He wanted to be Steve McQueen, Steve Austin and Steve McGarrett rolled into one--a self-contained hero who always got the girl without trying. Whenever he saw a girl he liked, he'd introduce himself as Steve.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2004 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
As one of the most colorful icons in the gonzo world of professional wrestling, "Stone Cold" Steve Austin has been involved in myriad ringside brawls and trash-talking feuds.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 2004 | PATRICK GOLDSTEIN
As one of the most colorful icons in the gonzo world of professional wrestling, "Stone Cold" Steve Austin has been involved in myriad ringside brawls and trash-talking feuds.
BUSINESS
August 8, 1998 | SUSAN ABRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The World Wrestling Federation, after winning a mini-bidding war for Debbie Reynolds Hotel & Casino, said Friday it plans to convert the bankrupt Las Vegas property into a themed resort to showcase its cast of hulking characters. The WWF was forced to raise its initial $10-million offer after an outside creditor appeared in court to bid $10.5 million. But the WWF upped its final offer to $10.6 million, which was approved Friday by U.S. Bankruptcy Court in Las Vegas.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1999 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Days off are a rare treat for "Stone Cold" Steve Austin, a professional wrestler of such stunning success as a pop culture phenomenon that he probably could rival the right honorable Gov. Jesse Ventura both in and out of the ring. But on a recent afternoon when Austin did have a breather, the hulking Texan didn't think twice about hopping a flight to Burbank to spend a tedious day in front of a film crew. After all, the rock 'n' roll dream beckoned.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 1987 | Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Lee Majors and Lindsay Wagner are returning in their roles as "The Six Million Dollar Man" and "The Bionic Woman" in a movie now in production for NBC. Richard Anderson also reprises his role as Oscar Goldman, the boss of Steve Austin (Majors) and Jaime Somers (Wagner). The name of the movie? "The Return of the Six Million Dollar Man and the Bionic Woman."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 5, 2006 | Dennis McLellan, Times Staff Writer
Bruce A. Peterson, the survivor of a spectacular crash of a wingless research aircraft on a dry lakebed in 1967, got used to being introduced as the real "Six Million Dollar Man." The former NASA research pilot and engineer, who died Monday at 72 of natural causes at his home in Laguna Niguel, helped inspire the 1974-78 television series starring Lee Majors as an astronaut and test pilot who is critically injured in a similar crash.
BUSINESS
September 8, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Former Beatle Paul McCartney will be featured as part of a national advertising campaign for Fidelity Investments, the largest U.S. mutual fund management company, the company said Wednesday. Fidelity also will co-sponsor McCartney's 11-week U.S. concert tour, which starts Sept. 16 in Miami. The ad takes viewers through events and accomplishments of the 63-year-old musician's life.
NEWS
August 29, 2000 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Duncan North says it all began 20 years ago in a Georgetown fern bar. He and his companions, 16-year-olds with fake IDs, were on the make. While the others were tall, athletic and handsome, however, North was an overweight student of Eastern philosophy who yearned to be cool. He wanted to be Steve McQueen, Steve Austin and Steve McGarrett rolled into one--a self-contained hero who always got the girl without trying. Whenever he saw a girl he liked, he'd introduce himself as Steve.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1999 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Days off are a rare treat for "Stone Cold" Steve Austin, a professional wrestler of such stunning success as a pop culture phenomenon that he probably could rival the right honorable Gov. Jesse Ventura both in and out of the ring. But on a recent afternoon when Austin did have a breather, the hulking Texan didn't think twice about hopping a flight to Burbank to spend a tedious day in front of a film crew. After all, the rock 'n' roll dream beckoned.
MAGAZINE
June 13, 2004 | Matthew Heller, Matthew Heller last wrote for the magazine about Utah's dietary-supplement industry.
In the auditorium of a San Diego church, pastor Barry Minkow paces the stage like a caged jungle cat, sweat saturating the back of his blue shirt, an audience of some 400 worshippers hanging on his every passionate word. He has spent the first 40 minutes of his Sunday sermon talking about damnation and redemption, about the two thieves at the crucifixion--the one who doubts Jesus and the one whom Jesus welcomes to paradise. Now he turns toward the wooden cross at the back of the stage.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2000 |
World Wrestling Federation Entertainment Inc. (WWFE), whose shares had apparently been down for the count since the company went public in October, got off the mat Tuesday with quarterly earnings that body-slammed Wall Street estimates. Net income at the company that made stars of such wrestlers as "Stone Cold" Steve Austin increased 54% in the quarter ended Jan. 28 to $15.7 million, or 23 cents a share.
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