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Steve Biko

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NEWS
September 12, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Steve Biko: A decade after his death in police custody, the name of the South African black consciousness leader itself remains a political statement here. Biko, the eloquent, charismatic advocate of black pride, still symbolizes the determination of the country's black majority to claim what they believe is their birthright and to end apartheid, South Africa's system of minority white rule and racial separation.
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WORLD
October 24, 2013 | By Ann M. Simmons
During the course of her career, South Africa's Mamphela Ramphele has assumed many roles - anti-apartheid activist, medical doctor, academic and businesswoman, just to name a few.   After the bloody uprising in Johannesburg's Soweto township in 1976, Ramphele was detained without trial. She was released after five months but was soon subjected to internal exile.   The indignity did not quell her spirit of activism or her professional success.   She helped found the Black Consciousness Movement with fellow activists Steve Biko and Barney Pityana.
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NEWS
February 18, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A South African prosecutor said he is considering whether to bring murder charges against police in the 1977 beating death of anti-apartheid leader Steve Biko. South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission rejected amnesty for three officers who interrogated Biko. Another has since died, and a fifth was denied amnesty in December. The officers' prosecution would likely reignite passions about a man who became synonymous with resistance to apartheid.
WORLD
May 30, 2004 | Robyn Dixon, Times Staff Writer
Marius Schoon, a white anti-apartheid activist, summed it up best as he sat opposite the killer of his wife and 6-year-old daughter during hearings of this country's Truth and Reconciliation Commission in 1998. Schoon told friends that he had no problem with the truth -- just the reconciliation. Two decades ago, the apartheid security police sent a letter bomb to Angola, where Schoon and his family were living in exile.
NEWS
September 12, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Black activist Steve Biko was acting "stubborn and too big for his boots" by defying police interrogators who killed him 20 years ago, an ex-officer said. The "state order" in the 1970s was for blacks to obey whites, Harold Snyman told the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Snyman and the four officers he commanded are seeking amnesty from the commission--set up to investigate apartheid-era political crimes--for the beating death of Biko.
NEWS
July 1, 1985 | From Reuters
A new inquiry into the 1977 death in police custody of South African black leader Steve Biko opens in the capital of Pretoria today. A South African court has ordered the country's medical watchdog group to hold a disciplinary inquiry into whether two district physicians, Ivor Lang and Benjamin Tucker, acted improperly in treating Biko, the popular, 30-year-old leader of the black consciousness movement. His death prompted an international outcry.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
A militant black anti-apartheid group demanded Wednesday that film director Richard Attenborough allow it to censor his forthcoming film, "Cry Freedom," which tells the story of Steve Biko, the founder of South Africa's black consciousness movement who was killed while in police custody. The Azanian People's Organization, which considers itself the only true heir of Biko's political legacy, threatened to launch an international campaign against the film if Attenborough refuses.
WORLD
October 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
The five policemen who were accused of killing anti-apartheid activist Steve Biko in 1977 won't be prosecuted because of insufficient evidence, Justice Ministry officials said Tuesday. A murder charge could not be supported in part because there were no witnesses to the killing, officials said. Charges of culpable homicide and assault also were considered, but because the killing occurred in 1977, the time frame for prosecution had lapsed.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 27, 1985 | John M. Wilson
Is South Africa finally bankable? A year or two ago, says producer Gautam Das, money wasn't available for projects dealing with apartheid. Now Das is prodding a newly hired screenwriter to finish a rewrite on Das' "Biko" project about martyred black South African leader Steve Biko. "Today," said Das, "I don't think I'd have any trouble getting the rest of the money."
NEWS
July 5, 1985 | Associated Press
A medical panel today found two white government doctors guilty of misconduct in the 1977 death of black leader Steve Biko, who became a martyr in the struggle against white-minority rule. The panel ruled that the two physicians failed to provide adequate care shortly before Biko died in police custody. One doctor was reprimanded and the other was barred from practicing medicine for three months, but that penalty was suspended. Both could have been barred from practice.
WORLD
October 8, 2003 | From Associated Press
The five policemen who were accused of killing anti-apartheid activist Steve Biko in 1977 won't be prosecuted because of insufficient evidence, Justice Ministry officials said Tuesday. A murder charge could not be supported in part because there were no witnesses to the killing, officials said. Charges of culpable homicide and assault also were considered, but because the killing occurred in 1977, the time frame for prosecution had lapsed.
BOOKS
August 29, 1999 | JON BLAIR, Jon Blair is an Academy Award-winning film director. He left South Africa in 1966 when he was drafted into the army. In 1976, he made the first documentary film about the Soweto uprising, shot illegally inside South Africa, and in 1977 he wrote "The Biko Inquest," which he subsequently directed off-Broadway
"They unbuttoned my shirt and pulled my breast out of my bra, they emptied one drawer and my breast was squeezed in the drawer. They did this several times on each of the breasts up until white sticky stuff burst out of the nipples . . . I cried, but it was no use, because no one could hear me." What kind of man is it that can do this or can push an electrified rod up the anus of a teenage boy or can coldbloodedly kill an uncooperative detainee and then hold an all-night steak-and-beer barbecue while he and the other killers burn their victim's body to ashes in a nearby fire?
NEWS
February 18, 1999 | From Times Wire Reports
A South African prosecutor said he is considering whether to bring murder charges against police in the 1977 beating death of anti-apartheid leader Steve Biko. South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission rejected amnesty for three officers who interrogated Biko. Another has since died, and a fifth was denied amnesty in December. The officers' prosecution would likely reignite passions about a man who became synonymous with resistance to apartheid.
NEWS
September 12, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Black activist Steve Biko was acting "stubborn and too big for his boots" by defying police interrogators who killed him 20 years ago, an ex-officer said. The "state order" in the 1970s was for blacks to obey whites, Harold Snyman told the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. Snyman and the four officers he commanded are seeking amnesty from the commission--set up to investigate apartheid-era political crimes--for the beating death of Biko.
NEWS
January 30, 1997 | BOB DROGIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four former security policemen claim that they did not intend to kill anti-apartheid leader Steven Biko when they beat him in an interrogation two decades ago, their lawyer said Wednesday. The four retired officers, plus a fifth who intends to confess, hope to win political amnesty from South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission in exchange for full confessions of their roles in one of the country's most infamous abuses under apartheid.
NEWS
January 29, 1997 | From Times Wire Reports
Four former policemen have claimed responsibility for the death of Black Consciousness Movement leader Steven Biko, said South Africa's Truth and Reconciliation Commission. The disclosures, in applications for amnesty from the commission, confirmed earlier reports by newspapers and legal sources. Biko, 30, died of untreated head injuries in a Pretoria prison Sept. 12, 1977. The lawyer for five policemen involved in the case said four officers had applied for amnesty and a fifth had made
NEWS
October 17, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Security police clashed again with anti-apartheid young people in a Cape Town suburb Wednesday, the day after police killed three youths throwing stones at a truck. Witnesses in the mixed-race suburb of Athlone said a 17-year-old youth was shot in the back and legs during one of Wednesday's clashes. He was hauled into the back of an armored personnel carrier as his mother pleaded to be allowed to take him to a doctor. Police were unable immediately to confirm the incident.
NEWS
September 5, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Two top officials of the Azanian People's Organization, a radical black consciousness group, were detained by South African security police Friday in a raid on the group's headquarters here. Nkosi Molala, the organization's president, and George Wauchope, its general secretary, were detained after a 90-minute search of the group's downtown offices.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Prints of the anti-apartheid film "Cry Freedom," seized by police from 30 South African theaters on its opening day in July, 1988, have been returned and the distributing company said Monday it will re-release the film April 27, nearly two years after its originally scheduled premiere. United International Pictures, the film's distributor here, said in a statement that it saw no remaining obstacles to the nationwide release of "Cry Freedom."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 30, 1988 | SCOTT KRAFT, Times Staff Writer
The international distributor of the anti-apartheid film "Cry Freedom" said Tuesday that it is postponing the movie's South African premiere, originally set for April 8, until the minister of justice gives his approval. "Our lawyers said we would be open to prosecution under the Internal Security Act if we exhibited the film without the prior consent of the minister of justice," said Peter Dignan, managing director of United International Pictures, the distributor in South Africa.
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