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NEWS
March 23, 2002 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles film producer Steve Bing has given $5 million to the Democratic National Committee, top party officials said Friday, confirming a second multimillion-dollar gift by an entertainment industry figure that would be prohibited under a campaign reform about to become law. The disclosure of Bing's donation came a day after the party announced that Hollywood mogul Haim Saban of Los Angeles had given a record-breaking sum of $7 million.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2010 | By Patrick McGreevy
The 10 people who gave the most money to California political campaigns during the last decade devoted a combined $266.6 million to their pet causes and candidates, a state report said Tuesday. Leading the list was Los Angeles billionaire Steve Bing, a film producer and heir to a real estate fortune, who made $58 million in such donations, according to the report by the Fair Political Practices Commission. About $40 million of that was in support of a 2006 proposal to tax the oil industry; voters rejected the measure after petroleum companies spent about $45 million opposing it. State Insurance Commissioner Steve Poizner, who is now writing personal checks to help his campaign for governor, was second on the list, with $43.2 million in contributions during the 10 years that ended Dec. 31. Others on the roster: Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who wrote checks for $25.8 million, and former EBay chief Meg Whitman, who is vying to succeed Schwarzenegger in the governor's chair.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2002 | RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even by Hollywood's inflated standards, the gala benefiting the Natural Resources Defense Council in May was a glittering event. Tom Hanks emceed. Steve Martin performed. And the Wadsworth Theater crowd, including Leonardo DiCaprio and Dustin Hoffman, roared appreciatively. The evening, which raised $1.6 million for one of Hollywood's pet environmental causes, was capped by a keynote speech by former President Clinton.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2008 | TINA DAUNT
It's easy to get celebrities to show up for a cause. Follow-through is another matter. When it happens, it makes all the difference. Take Brad Pitt's yearlong effort to assist residents of New Orleans' ravaged Lower 9th Ward return to their own homes.
NEWS
April 17, 2003 | From Associated Press
A British newspaper apologized to film producer Steve Bing Wednesday and admitted it falsely accused him of orchestrating a campaign of defamation against actress Elizabeth Hurley, the mother of his son. Associated Newspapers Ltd., Daily Mail editor Paul Dacre and journalist Daniel Jeffreys had agreed to apologize to Bing and to Los Angeles attorney Martin Singer, Bing's lawyer, Nathalie Paterson, told the High Court in London.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2002 | From Reuters
One of the most publicized Hollywood libel suits in recent years may be headed back to court amid complaints that a British newspaper's front-page apology to settle the issue was less than sincere. Los Angeles lawyers for wealthy American film producer Steve Bing have threatened to revive his multimillion-dollar libel suit against the Daily Mirror after its editor suggested that one needed a sense of humor to fully appreciate the apology.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2003 | Geoff Boucher
So how exactly do you get the most famous (and most expensive) rock band in the world to play for free? And why do you have a fund-raising concert and then give away the tickets for free? These questions will be answered Thursday at Staples Center, where the Rolling Stones will deliver their hits and licks in a free public concert for the first time since a certain ill-fated show at Altamont in 1969.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2003 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
Sean Penn has declared himself Hollywood's first political victim of blacklisting in decades. His alleged oppressor? Steve Bing, the wildly wealthy liberal playboy producer who's donated millions to the Democratic Party and recently shelled out $5 million so that the Rolling Stones could give a free concert at Staples Center in honor of the Natural Resources Defense Council.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2008 | TINA DAUNT
It's easy to get celebrities to show up for a cause. Follow-through is another matter. When it happens, it makes all the difference. Take Brad Pitt's yearlong effort to assist residents of New Orleans' ravaged Lower 9th Ward return to their own homes.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2002 | SORINA DIACONESCU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Maybe it was the cannoli. If so, it wouldn't be the first time a man lost his head over the crisp, delicate pastry shells stuffed with sweet mascarpone filling and sprinkled with powdered sugar. Didn't "The Godfather's" Clemenza urge an underling who had just carried out his kill order to "leave the gun, take the cannoli"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2005 | Dan Morain, Times Staff Writer
Wealthy Hollywood figure Stephen L. Bing, raising the stakes in the fight over redistricting, donated $4 million Friday to oppose Proposition 77, which would strip legislators of the right to draw their own districts. Bing gave the money to a committee headed by UCLA law professor Daniel Lowenstein, a former chairman of the California Fair Political Practices Commission and an author of California's political reform act.
NEWS
April 17, 2003 | From Associated Press
A British newspaper apologized to film producer Steve Bing Wednesday and admitted it falsely accused him of orchestrating a campaign of defamation against actress Elizabeth Hurley, the mother of his son. Associated Newspapers Ltd., Daily Mail editor Paul Dacre and journalist Daniel Jeffreys had agreed to apologize to Bing and to Los Angeles attorney Martin Singer, Bing's lawyer, Nathalie Paterson, told the High Court in London.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2003 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
Sean Penn has declared himself Hollywood's first political victim of blacklisting in decades. His alleged oppressor? Steve Bing, the wildly wealthy liberal playboy producer who's donated millions to the Democratic Party and recently shelled out $5 million so that the Rolling Stones could give a free concert at Staples Center in honor of the Natural Resources Defense Council.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2003 | Geoff Boucher
So how exactly do you get the most famous (and most expensive) rock band in the world to play for free? And why do you have a fund-raising concert and then give away the tickets for free? These questions will be answered Thursday at Staples Center, where the Rolling Stones will deliver their hits and licks in a free public concert for the first time since a certain ill-fated show at Altamont in 1969.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 2002 | From Reuters
One of the most publicized Hollywood libel suits in recent years may be headed back to court amid complaints that a British newspaper's front-page apology to settle the issue was less than sincere. Los Angeles lawyers for wealthy American film producer Steve Bing have threatened to revive his multimillion-dollar libel suit against the Daily Mirror after its editor suggested that one needed a sense of humor to fully appreciate the apology.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 3, 2002 | RACHEL ABRAMOWITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even by Hollywood's inflated standards, the gala benefiting the Natural Resources Defense Council in May was a glittering event. Tom Hanks emceed. Steve Martin performed. And the Wadsworth Theater crowd, including Leonardo DiCaprio and Dustin Hoffman, roared appreciatively. The evening, which raised $1.6 million for one of Hollywood's pet environmental causes, was capped by a keynote speech by former President Clinton.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 2005 | Dan Morain, Times Staff Writer
Wealthy Hollywood figure Stephen L. Bing, raising the stakes in the fight over redistricting, donated $4 million Friday to oppose Proposition 77, which would strip legislators of the right to draw their own districts. Bing gave the money to a committee headed by UCLA law professor Daniel Lowenstein, a former chairman of the California Fair Political Practices Commission and an author of California's political reform act.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2010 | By Patrick McGreevy
The 10 people who gave the most money to California political campaigns during the last decade devoted a combined $266.6 million to their pet causes and candidates, a state report said Tuesday. Leading the list was Los Angeles billionaire Steve Bing, a film producer and heir to a real estate fortune, who made $58 million in such donations, according to the report by the Fair Political Practices Commission. About $40 million of that was in support of a 2006 proposal to tax the oil industry; voters rejected the measure after petroleum companies spent about $45 million opposing it. State Insurance Commissioner Steve Poizner, who is now writing personal checks to help his campaign for governor, was second on the list, with $43.2 million in contributions during the 10 years that ended Dec. 31. Others on the roster: Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, who wrote checks for $25.8 million, and former EBay chief Meg Whitman, who is vying to succeed Schwarzenegger in the governor's chair.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2002 | SORINA DIACONESCU, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Maybe it was the cannoli. If so, it wouldn't be the first time a man lost his head over the crisp, delicate pastry shells stuffed with sweet mascarpone filling and sprinkled with powdered sugar. Didn't "The Godfather's" Clemenza urge an underling who had just carried out his kill order to "leave the gun, take the cannoli"?
NEWS
March 23, 2002 | NICK ANDERSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles film producer Steve Bing has given $5 million to the Democratic National Committee, top party officials said Friday, confirming a second multimillion-dollar gift by an entertainment industry figure that would be prohibited under a campaign reform about to become law. The disclosure of Bing's donation came a day after the party announced that Hollywood mogul Haim Saban of Los Angeles had given a record-breaking sum of $7 million.
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