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Steve Bjorkman

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1998 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Once upon a time, there was a boy who liked to draw. Steve Bjorkman drew pictures of funny-looking people and animals all day long. Even when he was supposed to be listening to his teachers, he drew pictures in his notebook. His teachers did not appreciate his talent. "I would look a lot and draw a lot, but I never thought I would make a career of it.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1998 | RUSS LOAR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Once upon a time, there was a boy who liked to draw. Steve Bjorkman drew pictures of funny-looking people and animals all day long. Even when he was supposed to be listening to his teachers, he drew pictures in his notebook. His teachers did not appreciate his talent. "I would look a lot and draw a lot, but I never thought I would make a career of it.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1999
Books recommended for young readers by Ilene Abramson, senior librarian, Los Angeles Public Library: An extra helping of fun holiday books for the whole family. Preschool and kindergarten: "I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Pie," by Alison Jackson, illustrated by Judith Byron Schachner An updated version of a childhood favorite.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1999 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So how did Orange County's ultraconservative TV talk-show host Wally George fare during his recent live phone interview on Howard Stern's radio program to promote his memoir "Wally George: The Father of Combat TV"? George's publisher, James C. Riordan of Santa Ana-based Seven Locks Press, provides the highlights: * George confronted Stern's earlier prediction that George would die after his 1994 surgery for prostate cancer. Stern recanted. * Stern poked fun at George's stuttering problem.
NEWS
March 20, 1991 | MARY YARBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Open just about any literature textbook and you'll most likely see that women writers make up just a small fraction of the contents. It shouldn't be that way. Women have been writing in all genres for centuries and there are more good women writers today than ever before. Because March is recognized nationally as Women's History Month, I asked some of my colleagues to join me in recommending a diverse group of books exploring the female experience. These books are not for women only.
NEWS
March 14, 1991 | MARY YARBER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; Mary Yarber teaches English and journalism at Santa Monica High School. Her education column appears weekly in The Times
Open just about any literature textbook and you'll most likely see that women writers make up just a small fraction of the contents. It shouldn't be that way. Women have been writing in all genres for centuries and there are more good women writers today than ever before.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 14, 1996 | CORINNE FLOCKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For the child who "reads" a book by gazing at its pictures, or the adult who thumbs contentedly through a storybook after picking it up merely to replace it on its shelf, the Brea Civic and Cultural Center Gallery offers "Worth a Thousand Words . . . Children's Book Illustrations," a wide-ranging collection of 75 paintings, collages, pencil drawings and other works by more than a dozen California artists.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1999 | MICHAEL LUO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blossoming in suburbs everywhere, megachurches--the mostly evangelical, mostly nondenominational institutions that have transformed religious practice in America--are now approaching middle age and have begun to encounter serious obstacles to growth. Megachurches, defined as congregations with 2,000 or more members, grew by offering polished services and practical messages in super-sized sanctuaries.
NEWS
June 6, 1999 | MICHAEL LUO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Blossoming in suburbs everywhere, megachurches have transformed religion in America, offering polished services and practical messages in super-sized sanctuaries. But many churches in the movement, now approaching middle age, have begun to encounter serious obstacles to growth. To overcome those problems--ranging from disaffected members to unhappy neighbors and an inability to connect to younger congregants--pastors at leading megachurches nationwide are planning radical change.
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