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Steve Coleman

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1998 | Don Heckman
Alto saxophonist and composer Steve Coleman, 41, one of the leaders of the musicians associated around New York's M-Base (Macro-Basic Array of Structured Extemporization) movement, has been pursing a vigorously independent path for most of his career. By any definition, he is an artist who deserves more widespread attention. This career-defining two-CD release stretches across the breadth of Coleman's interests.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2012 | By Chris Barton
After a weekend that featured guitarist Bill Frisell performing a soundtrack to a film by Bill Morrison and pianist Myra Melford performing with a Butoh dancer, the Angel City Jazz Festival closed on what initially appeared to be a more conventional musical collaboration. Celebrated pianist Vijay Iyer joined his mentor, saxophonist Steve Coleman at Royce Hall in a set co-sponsored by Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA Sunday night. A forward-looking improviser and thinker who has influenced a generation of jazz artists, including fellow Angel City performer Ambrose Akinmusire, Coleman was the driving force behind M-Base, a loose musical collective during the '90s and an evolving school of creative thought whose effect continues to be heard in contemporary jazz.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1993 | DON SNOWDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Don't expect Steve Coleman to willingly accept the jazz label for his music. The New York-based saxophonist is thoroughly grounded in the jazz tradition but Coleman places his music within a broad, non-Western aesthetic that dispenses with virtually all categories. "I'm one of those musicians who is on that particular path that started back with King Oliver and Louis Armstrong," explained Coleman, 36, by telephone from Mainz, Germany.
NEWS
April 29, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Maybe it was the sheer fatigue from driving to Los Angeles from San Francisco before stepping onstage Tuesday at REDCAT. Maybe it was the freeway traffic jam that delayed their arrival until a half hour after the scheduled start time. Whatever the cause, alto saxophonist Steve Coleman's performance with his group, Five Elements, rarely achieved its usual high standard of inventiveness.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1997 | Bill Kohlhaase
Saxophonist Steve Coleman has found a number of invigorating backdrops for his strangely linear alto play over the years, most frequently threading it through hip-hop and funk beats. But here, Coleman and his Mystic Rhythm Society team with the Cuban folklore ensemble AfroCuba de Matanzas to explore Yoruba and other African musical traditions that survive in Cuba.
NEWS
April 29, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Maybe it was the sheer fatigue from driving to Los Angeles from San Francisco before stepping onstage Tuesday at REDCAT. Maybe it was the freeway traffic jam that delayed their arrival until a half hour after the scheduled start time. Whatever the cause, alto saxophonist Steve Coleman's performance with his group, Five Elements, rarely achieved its usual high standard of inventiveness.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1991 | DON SNOWDEN
*** 1/2 Steve Coleman and Five Elements, "Black Science," Novus/RCA. This is Coleman's most fully realized recording to date. Here the M-Base saxophonist boils his electric, eclectic sound down to its essence. His quintet plays less, which means more room for Coleman's slippery alto to dart and glide through the arrangements.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 27, 1994 | DON SNOWDEN
**** Steve Coleman and Five Elements, "The Tao of Mad Phat/Fringe Zones," Novus/RCA. Chalk it up to new drummer Oliver Gene Lake Jr., or the informal ambience of the live-with-studio-audience format, but this album is a quantum leap for saxophonist/composer Coleman. The density of his previous Five Elements albums required several listens to connect with the rhythmically based improvisation but the light, limber physicality of the funk here creates immediate contact.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1993 | DON HECKMAN
"We don't exactly play dinner music," said Steve Coleman as he looked out at his audience Monday night at the start of a four-day run at Catalina. And he was right about that. Coleman's Five Elements group--one of the important units in the Brooklyn-based avant-garde collective, M-Base--played a set of music that was far too demanding to serve as distant accompaniment for dining.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 15, 2012 | By Chris Barton
After a weekend that featured guitarist Bill Frisell performing a soundtrack to a film by Bill Morrison and pianist Myra Melford performing with a Butoh dancer, the Angel City Jazz Festival closed on what initially appeared to be a more conventional musical collaboration. Celebrated pianist Vijay Iyer joined his mentor, saxophonist Steve Coleman at Royce Hall in a set co-sponsored by Center for the Art of Performance at UCLA Sunday night. A forward-looking improviser and thinker who has influenced a generation of jazz artists, including fellow Angel City performer Ambrose Akinmusire, Coleman was the driving force behind M-Base, a loose musical collective during the '90s and an evolving school of creative thought whose effect continues to be heard in contemporary jazz.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2001 | TINA BORGATTA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Orange police shot and killed a man early Saturday after he fired at officers several times during a five-hour standoff, authorities said. No officers were injured. The man's wife called authorities to their home on East Garfield Avenue shortly after 8:45 p.m. Friday. She told authorities that her husband, Steve Coleman, 48, had a rifle and a handgun and was threatening to kill her and himself. "She was able to leave the home to call police," said Sgt. Dave Hill.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 12, 1998 | Don Heckman
Alto saxophonist and composer Steve Coleman, 41, one of the leaders of the musicians associated around New York's M-Base (Macro-Basic Array of Structured Extemporization) movement, has been pursing a vigorously independent path for most of his career. By any definition, he is an artist who deserves more widespread attention. This career-defining two-CD release stretches across the breadth of Coleman's interests.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 18, 1997 | Bill Kohlhaase
Saxophonist Steve Coleman has found a number of invigorating backdrops for his strangely linear alto play over the years, most frequently threading it through hip-hop and funk beats. But here, Coleman and his Mystic Rhythm Society team with the Cuban folklore ensemble AfroCuba de Matanzas to explore Yoruba and other African musical traditions that survive in Cuba.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 29, 1994 | BILL KOHLHAASE
* * 1/2 Steve Coleman, Robin Eubanks, Greg Osby, Cassandra Wilson, "Flashback on M-base," JMT. This collection, spanning nine years, is certainly not the best of M-base, the hip-hop-meets-jazz movement that's been hailed as the music's badly needed new direction. A varied sampling of the Brooklyn-born genre, it includes M-base's worst as well, like the repetitive beat anthem "To Perpetuate the Funk" and the irritating "I'm Going Home," both written by Kevin Bruce Harris.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 3, 1993 | DON HECKMAN
"We don't exactly play dinner music," said Steve Coleman as he looked out at his audience Monday night at the start of a four-day run at Catalina. And he was right about that. Coleman's Five Elements group--one of the important units in the Brooklyn-based avant-garde collective, M-Base--played a set of music that was far too demanding to serve as distant accompaniment for dining.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 26, 1993 | DON SNOWDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Don't expect Steve Coleman to willingly accept the jazz label for his music. The New York-based saxophonist is thoroughly grounded in the jazz tradition but Coleman places his music within a broad, non-Western aesthetic that dispenses with virtually all categories. "I'm one of those musicians who is on that particular path that started back with King Oliver and Louis Armstrong," explained Coleman, 36, by telephone from Mainz, Germany.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 13, 1991 | DON SNOWDEN
Coleman is an M-Base ringleader and his first Novus release demands adjustments in the way listeners approach contemporary electric jazz. Rhythm is the key element but "Rhythm People" isn't an exercise in facile groove-mongering--the improvisations spring from Marvin (Smitty) Smith's constantly shifting drum patterns more than formal melodic lines or chord changes.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1991 | DON SNOWDEN
*** 1/2 Steve Coleman and Five Elements, "Black Science," Novus/RCA. This is Coleman's most fully realized recording to date. Here the M-Base saxophonist boils his electric, eclectic sound down to its essence. His quintet plays less, which means more room for Coleman's slippery alto to dart and glide through the arrangements.
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