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Steve Courson

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2005 | From Associated Press
Steve Courson, a former offensive lineman for the Pittsburgh Steelers who developed a heart problem after becoming one of the first National Football League players to acknowledge using steroids, was killed Thursday in Pennsylvania when a tree he was cutting fell on him. He was 50. Courson was using a chain saw to cut down a dead 44-foot-tall tree with a circumference of 5 feet when it fell on him, according to state police. The accident happened about 1 p.m.
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SPORTS
July 3, 2008 | Jeff Barker, Baltimore Sun
In the months before his death in 2005, former NFL lineman Steve Courson wrote a 5,000-word letter expressing disappointment that more players weren't open about their steroid use and saying the league's enormous popularity relies on a "myth" of its players as drug-free heroes.
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SPORTS
July 18, 2006 | Sam Farmer, Times Staff Writer
One was lifting weights at home. Another was training for a triathlon. A third was watching a game at a friend's house. Regular guys doing regular things. Then there were the others. One drank antifreeze. Another was in a high-speed chase. Two things in common among all: They were Pittsburgh Steelers; and they died in the last six years. Fresh off their first Super Bowl victory in 26 years, the Steelers have experienced the emotional gamut.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1990 | MICHAEL ASHCRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years ago, when Steve Courson retired from professional football, he discovered that he suffered from a heart condition that he blames on his use of anabolic steroids. On Thursday, Courson, a bulky former offensive guard and two-time Super Bowl player, told an assembly of 1,200 Fountain Valley High School students that those who use performance-enhancing drugs are risking their health. "I used steroids," Courson told the audience in the basketball gym. "I had the worldly vision of success.
SPORTS
July 12, 1989 | MARCIA DUNN, Associated Press
Every day, while he waits and hopes a suitable heart has been found, Steve Courson scribbles furiously into spiral notebooks. He is concluding more than three years of work on an autobiography that includes a long chapter on the hazards of anabolic steroids. He also is writing letters and editorials on what he calls the sports world's "chemical dilemma." "This health demise of mine is not something that I'm really thrilled about having to deal with," he said.
SPORTS
May 10, 1989 | MICHAEL D. SHEAR, Times Staff Writer
All-pro lineman Bill Fralic of the Atlanta Falcons said here Tuesday that "steroid madness" pervades most locker rooms and weight rooms in professional football, and estimated that 75% of today's linemen use the body-building drugs. Steve Courson, who played with the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers until he retired in 1985, called himself "a man possessed" when he used anabolic steroids and said that they might have caused permanent damage to his heart. He said that doctors have given him five years to live.
SPORTS
July 12, 1989 | MARCIA DUNN, Associated Press
He was one of professional football's mightiest men, a 295-pounder who could bench press twice his weight. Now, Steve Courson is thrilled to lift 15-pound weights. The former offensive lineman, now 33, suffers from cardiomyopathy, a mysterious disease that turns heart muscle into flab and eventually kills its victims unless they undergo a transplant. Though his doctors can't blame Courson's condition on his long, heavy use of anabolic steroids, they can't rule it out. Neither can he.
SPORTS
July 3, 2008 | Jeff Barker, Baltimore Sun
In the months before his death in 2005, former NFL lineman Steve Courson wrote a 5,000-word letter expressing disappointment that more players weren't open about their steroid use and saying the league's enormous popularity relies on a "myth" of its players as drug-free heroes.
SPORTS
July 18, 2006 | Sam Farmer, Times Staff Writer
One was lifting weights at home. Another was training for a triathlon. A third was watching a game at a friend's house. Regular guys doing regular things. Then there were the others. One drank antifreeze. Another was in a high-speed chase. Two things in common among all: They were Pittsburgh Steelers; and they died in the last six years. Fresh off their first Super Bowl victory in 26 years, the Steelers have experienced the emotional gamut.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2005 | From Associated Press
Steve Courson, a former offensive lineman for the Pittsburgh Steelers who developed a heart problem after becoming one of the first National Football League players to acknowledge using steroids, was killed Thursday in Pennsylvania when a tree he was cutting fell on him. He was 50. Courson was using a chain saw to cut down a dead 44-foot-tall tree with a circumference of 5 feet when it fell on him, according to state police. The accident happened about 1 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1990 | MICHAEL ASHCRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five years ago, when Steve Courson retired from professional football, he discovered that he suffered from a heart condition that he blames on his use of anabolic steroids. On Thursday, Courson, a bulky former offensive guard and two-time Super Bowl player, told an assembly of 1,200 Fountain Valley High School students that those who use performance-enhancing drugs are risking their health. "I used steroids," Courson told the audience in the basketball gym. "I had the worldly vision of success.
SPORTS
July 12, 1989 | MARCIA DUNN, Associated Press
He was one of professional football's mightiest men, a 295-pounder who could bench press twice his weight. Now, Steve Courson is thrilled to lift 15-pound weights. The former offensive lineman, now 33, suffers from cardiomyopathy, a mysterious disease that turns heart muscle into flab and eventually kills its victims unless they undergo a transplant. Though his doctors can't blame Courson's condition on his long, heavy use of anabolic steroids, they can't rule it out. Neither can he.
SPORTS
July 12, 1989 | MARCIA DUNN, Associated Press
Every day, while he waits and hopes a suitable heart has been found, Steve Courson scribbles furiously into spiral notebooks. He is concluding more than three years of work on an autobiography that includes a long chapter on the hazards of anabolic steroids. He also is writing letters and editorials on what he calls the sports world's "chemical dilemma." "This health demise of mine is not something that I'm really thrilled about having to deal with," he said.
SPORTS
May 10, 1989 | MICHAEL D. SHEAR, Times Staff Writer
All-pro lineman Bill Fralic of the Atlanta Falcons said here Tuesday that "steroid madness" pervades most locker rooms and weight rooms in professional football, and estimated that 75% of today's linemen use the body-building drugs. Steve Courson, who played with the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers until he retired in 1985, called himself "a man possessed" when he used anabolic steroids and said that they might have caused permanent damage to his heart. He said that doctors have given him five years to live.
SPORTS
September 29, 1991 | From Staff and Wire Reports
Professional athletes are reluctant to talk about their steroid use because they fear fans' reactions, former offensive lineman Steve Courson said. "Admitting to steroid use while they played minimizes their athletic achievement," said Courson, 35, who played with the Pittsburgh Steelers and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers. He was among athletes interviewed by The Atlanta Journal-Constitution in a telephone survey of 506 retired NFL players about steroid use.
SPORTS
November 29, 1986
Many NFL players oppose steroids but use the drugs anyway to remain competitive, according to a former offensive lineman who played for the Pittsburgh Steelers. "The game is violent, the players are in heavy combat and they need chemicals to survive," said Steve Courson, who is writing a book about the use of steroids in the National Football League. "Those chemicals could be pain killers, cortisone shots or steroids."
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