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BUSINESS
June 22, 1989
Alaska May Sue Exxon: Alaska Gov. Steve Cowper said the state would probably file a lawsuit against Exxon Corp. if the company's cleanup of oil-fouled Prince William Sound is not completed by September as planned. Cowper, speaking in Los Angeles on the effects of the March 24 Exxon Valdez oil spill on state tourism, said the state hoped to recover some of the $55 million he estimated Alaska has spent dealing with the spill.
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BUSINESS
June 22, 1989
Alaska May Sue Exxon: Alaska Gov. Steve Cowper said the state would probably file a lawsuit against Exxon Corp. if the company's cleanup of oil-fouled Prince William Sound is not completed by September as planned. Cowper, speaking in Los Angeles on the effects of the March 24 Exxon Valdez oil spill on state tourism, said the state hoped to recover some of the $55 million he estimated Alaska has spent dealing with the spill.
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NEWS
April 24, 1989
Siberia and Alaska officials were forced by fog and blowing snow to resort to telephone diplomacy in their efforts to win approval for regular visits between the countries by Eskimos. Gov. Steve Cowper and the Alaska delegation were grounded in Nome, so he used a radio-telephone hookup to communicate with his counterpart from the Magadan region of the Soviet Far East, Vyacheslav I. Kobets. Kobets was on the ice pack at the international date line between the Diomede islands. A largely symbolic protocol signed by Cowper calls for a commission to oversee travel between the countries.
NEWS
June 7, 1989
Alaska Gov. Steve Cowper, beginning a tourism promotion tour to allay fears that his state's coastline is awash in oil, said in Seattle that nearly all of Alaska's attractions are untouched by the nation's worst oil spill. In the first stop on a multi-state tour, Cowper urged tourists not to cancel their summer plans to visit the 50th state because of the March 24 Exxon Valdez spill. Cowper said only 2% of the state's beaches were touched by oil and noted Alaska has more coastline--47,300 miles--than the rest of the nation combined.
NEWS
April 24, 1989
Pools of petroleum sheen escaped containment booms near the ruptured hull of the Exxon Valdez, and officials expressed concern that the vessel is still contributing to the nation's worst oil spill. At least 16,000 gallons of emulsified oil remain in the hold of the tanker now docked in a cove on Naked Island, about 40 miles from Bligh Reef off Valdez, Alaska, where the ship ran aground March 24, spewing more than 10 million gallons. Bill Lamoreaux, on-the-scene coordinator for the state of Alaska, said a state observer noted a light coating of oil outside containment booms encircling the craft.
NEWS
May 13, 1989 | From United Press International
Alaska drafted emergency rules Friday declaring a "zero tolerance" policy for oil on fish catches, and the governor signed into law measures increasing spill fines and creating a blue-ribbon panel to examine the way oil companies operate in the nation's largest oil state. Seven weeks after the Exxon Valdez ran aground, spewing 11 million gallons of crude oil into Alaskan waters, oil continued to spread. New oil spotted near Kodiak prompted the state Department of Fish and Game to cancel herring fishing between Afognak and Kodiak Islands, said Larry Malloy, fisheries biologist in Kodiak, the nation's No. 1 fishing port.
NEWS
April 3, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The federal government will take a broad new look at the environmental impact of oil drilling in Alaska and will require better safeguards against accidents as a result of the massive oil spill in Prince William Sound, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency said Sunday. "I think we're going to take the environmental planning completely apart for every aspect of Alaska oil development and make sure that it is as sound, as careful as we can possibly make it," EPA Administrator William K.
NEWS
April 7, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Backed by public antipathy toward the Exxon Valdez oil spill disaster, Gov. Steve Cowper on Thursday threatened to close down the trans-Alaska oil pipeline unless its owners meet his terms for improved safety and cleanup measures. At the same time, it was disclosed that federal officials are probing the possibility that Exxon's 987-foot oil tanker was on autopilot shortly before it ran aground and that the electronic navigation aid confused the crew and contributed to the accident.
NEWS
November 5, 1986
Republican Arliss Sturgulewski failed in her bid to join the ranks of women governors, losing a 56%-44% race to Democrat Steve Cowper. In the Senate race, Republican incumbent Frank Murkowski easily defeated Democrat Glenn Olds, 52% to 48%. Alaska's lone House seat was retained by Republican Rep. Don Young, who beat Democrat Pegge Begich, 56% to 44%.
NEWS
October 21, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Eskimos, Indians and Aleuts declared war against a disease ravaging their people: alcoholism. A blue ribbon commission of native leaders stood before the 1,000 delegates to the Alaska Federation of Natives convention and before many more watching on statewide television in some 200 villages and begged Alaska's aboriginal people to give up liquor. Alcohol is linked to nearly all violence, injuries and suicides involving Alaska natives, who make up 15% of the state's population.
NEWS
May 13, 1989 | From United Press International
Alaska drafted emergency rules Friday declaring a "zero tolerance" policy for oil on fish catches, and the governor signed into law measures increasing spill fines and creating a blue-ribbon panel to examine the way oil companies operate in the nation's largest oil state. Seven weeks after the Exxon Valdez ran aground, spewing 11 million gallons of crude oil into Alaskan waters, oil continued to spread. New oil spotted near Kodiak prompted the state Department of Fish and Game to cancel herring fishing between Afognak and Kodiak Islands, said Larry Malloy, fisheries biologist in Kodiak, the nation's No. 1 fishing port.
NEWS
April 24, 1989
Pools of petroleum sheen escaped containment booms near the ruptured hull of the Exxon Valdez, and officials expressed concern that the vessel is still contributing to the nation's worst oil spill. At least 16,000 gallons of emulsified oil remain in the hold of the tanker now docked in a cove on Naked Island, about 40 miles from Bligh Reef off Valdez, Alaska, where the ship ran aground March 24, spewing more than 10 million gallons. Bill Lamoreaux, on-the-scene coordinator for the state of Alaska, said a state observer noted a light coating of oil outside containment booms encircling the craft.
NEWS
April 7, 1989 | MARK A. STEIN, Times Staff Writer
Backed by public antipathy toward the Exxon Valdez oil spill disaster, Gov. Steve Cowper on Thursday threatened to close down the trans-Alaska oil pipeline unless its owners meet his terms for improved safety and cleanup measures. At the same time, it was disclosed that federal officials are probing the possibility that Exxon's 987-foot oil tanker was on autopilot shortly before it ran aground and that the electronic navigation aid confused the crew and contributed to the accident.
NEWS
April 3, 1989 | DOYLE McMANUS, Times Staff Writer
The federal government will take a broad new look at the environmental impact of oil drilling in Alaska and will require better safeguards against accidents as a result of the massive oil spill in Prince William Sound, the head of the Environmental Protection Agency said Sunday. "I think we're going to take the environmental planning completely apart for every aspect of Alaska oil development and make sure that it is as sound, as careful as we can possibly make it," EPA Administrator William K.
NEWS
July 6, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A raging wildfire that has consumed more than 14,000 acres forced residents of Tok--a town southeast of Fairbanks--to abandon their homes, burned a Coast Guard station and other buildings and blocked the Alaska Highway, the main road into the state. "The fire is out of control," a state forester said. The blaze was among 159 raging across Alaska. Gov. Steve Cowper declared an emergency and called on the Alaska National Guard to fight the fires.
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