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Steve Diskin

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NEWS
December 30, 1988 | CONNIE KOENENN
At Mega-Erg, a Beverly Hills think tank aimed at creating the office of the future while improving the workplace of the present, founders Lawrence Lerner and Steve Diskin report progress in both areas. "We've issued two more patents on air-purification devices and are negotiating for the licensing of MicroSystem, our hottest product," said Lerner, an international pioneer in office design. "Our inventory is growing."
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NEWS
December 30, 1988 | CONNIE KOENENN
At Mega-Erg, a Beverly Hills think tank aimed at creating the office of the future while improving the workplace of the present, founders Lawrence Lerner and Steve Diskin report progress in both areas. "We've issued two more patents on air-purification devices and are negotiating for the licensing of MicroSystem, our hottest product," said Lerner, an international pioneer in office design. "Our inventory is growing."
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BOOKS
October 17, 1993 | Susan Reynolds
LOS ANGELES at 25mph by Steve Diskin and Joseph Giovannini. (Van Nostrand Reinhold: $29.95.) We are very partial to any book that admonishes us to: "Slow down!" Since getting out of the car is next to impossible, slowing down to 25 m.p.h. seems the next best thing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 13, 1994
Americans resist the notion that homelessness is now normal in their country. Anyone older than 20 can remember when virtually no one was living on the streets of the United States. The hope lingers that something that came with such speed will pass with equal speed. Unfortunately, an impressive body of research suggests the opposite. If homelessness is a disease with no quick cure, are there at least palliatives for it?
BUSINESS
May 21, 1989 | PRESTON LERNER
Never before has so much time, energy and money been spent on office design. And it's a good thing, too. Because as things stand today, so the experts say, the great American office is a disaster area. "What I find, typically, is that people's feet are freezing, their heads are burning up and there's glare everywhere," said Steve Diskin, a Beverly Hills architect and industrial designer who specializes in office design. Even worse, he said, the atmosphere is stale, infectious bacteria recirculate through the heating and air-conditioning systems and annoying noises seem to waft out of every corner of the office.
NEWS
July 4, 1988 | CONNIE KOENENN, Times Staff Writer
Two years ago, Lawrence Lerner and Steve Diskin took a brainstorming inventory of the changing world of office design--its open work spaces, sealed buildings and rampant new technology. What they saw was a generation of white-collar workers struggling with a host of new ergonomical needs: The open-plan office deprived them of privacy, the chairs for computer users didn't change position when the user did, the office air was often stale and the lighting was inappropriate.
NEWS
March 5, 1990 | LEON WHITESON
On a typical day, more than 100 million Americans will spend half their waking hours in offices, surrounded by desks, chairs, telephones, computer terminals and the other objects that have become the intimate companions of their working lives. So the question seems natural: Does the quality of the design of office equipment--as opposed to its technological efficiency--color employees' feelings and affect the way they work?
NEWS
October 24, 1993 | RENEE TAWA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pasadena college student Christopher Lum was horrified when he heard that barefoot blind men stumble for miles through West Africa's savanna, only to reach a primitive two-room adobe hospital in the dreary bush land. The 25-year-old senior at Pasadena's Art Center College of Design learned that victims of the crippling "river blindness" disease near Tamou, Niger, have nowhere else to go for help.
NEWS
March 19, 1990 | JONATHAN WEBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the renowned furniture designer Bill Stumpf teaches his industrial design course, he always begins with two slides. The first shows a state-of-the-art office complete with dimmed lights, sleek furniture modules and glowing computer screens. The second shows writer E. B. White sitting on a wooden bench at a wooden table in a shed in front of an open, bay-view window and typing on a manual typewriter.
MAGAZINE
May 15, 1994 | JOSEPH GIOVANNINI, Writer and architect Joseph Giovannini's last article for the magazine was about the renovation of the Central Library in Downtown Los Angeles
At a two-wine, three-fork luncheon in New York's Plaza Hotel a couple of years ago, when editors of Progressive Architecture announced their choice for the year's best designs, alarmed New York architects stopped sipping their decaf as they realized that Angelenos were walking off with every other award.
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