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Steve Ditko

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2002 | JORDAN RAPHAEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When "Spider-Man" credits roll on Friday, a name will appear alongside Stan Lee's that may elicit wild cheering from a few audience members and muted confusion from everyone else. The name is Steve Ditko. And the people applauding are comic-book fans thrilled that Ditko, the original artist and co-creator of Spider-Man, has been given proper credit--at long last--on the occasion of Spidey's big-screen debut. Ditko won't be anywhere in the vicinity of the movie's hype machine, though.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2011
Stan Lee, the biggest name in comic-book history if you don't count the heroes and villains, got his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame Tuesday as fans and friends cheered. As a writer and editor, Lee had a hand in the creation of hundreds of heroes and villains. Collaborating with artists such as Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, John Romita and John Buscema he gave the world the modern mythology of Marvel Comics with Spider-Man, the Hulk, the Fantastic Four, Iron Man, the X-Men, Thor, the Silver Surfer, Daredevil, the Avengers, Doctor Strange and Nick Fury.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2002
Your article about Spider-Man's co-creator, Steve Ditko, a truly remarkable comic book writer-artist, was one of the best researched, most thoughtful articles I've ever read ("Spider-Man's Long-Lost Parent," by Jordan Raphael, April 29). Even more amazing is the fact that, although I've been a fan of Ditko's work for 35 years, this is the first time I've ever seen a clear photograph of him. If you had published a close-up photo of the Loch Ness Monster or the Abominable Snowman, I doubt I would have been any more bowled over.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2009
Loved Geoff Boucher's story on Jack King Kirby ("A Credit to His Name," Sept. 27). It's richly deserved that Kirby is finally getting a little attention, although far too little too late, for his contributions to comics and American culture. I was a huge Marvel comics fan when young and stopped reading them in my teens. I thought it was disinterest, but I realized late in life that I lost interest mainly because Kirby had left Marvel. They had a lot of artists go through Marvel and DC, but only a few were magic for me, people like Kirby, Steve Ditko, Barry Smith and Jim Steranko.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2009
Loved Geoff Boucher's story on Jack King Kirby ("A Credit to His Name," Sept. 27). It's richly deserved that Kirby is finally getting a little attention, although far too little too late, for his contributions to comics and American culture. I was a huge Marvel comics fan when young and stopped reading them in my teens. I thought it was disinterest, but I realized late in life that I lost interest mainly because Kirby had left Marvel. They had a lot of artists go through Marvel and DC, but only a few were magic for me, people like Kirby, Steve Ditko, Barry Smith and Jim Steranko.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 5, 2011
Stan Lee, the biggest name in comic-book history if you don't count the heroes and villains, got his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame Tuesday as fans and friends cheered. As a writer and editor, Lee had a hand in the creation of hundreds of heroes and villains. Collaborating with artists such as Jack Kirby, Steve Ditko, John Romita and John Buscema he gave the world the modern mythology of Marvel Comics with Spider-Man, the Hulk, the Fantastic Four, Iron Man, the X-Men, Thor, the Silver Surfer, Daredevil, the Avengers, Doctor Strange and Nick Fury.
BOOKS
June 22, 2008 | Geoff Boucher, Geoff Boucher is a Times staff writer.
TWO WEEKS ago, at a cafe in San Francisco, I found myself across a table from Frank Miller, the most important comic book artist of the last 25 years. I was there to interview him about his shift to Hollywood filmmaking, but the conversation was derailed when I mentioned I was reading Blake Bell's "Strange and Stranger: The World of Steve Ditko." A look of alarm and intrigue ran across Miller's face. He put down his drink and leaned forward. "What does it say? Tell me!"
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 1992 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Comics on View: The Valiant Traveling Art Show, an exhibit of original comic-book artwork explaining the cartooning process from preliminary black-and-white pencil sketches to full-color product, opens at Golden Apple Comics in West Hollywood Monday. Among the cartoonists represented are Barry Windsor-Smith, who drew "Conan the Barbarian" comics; Steve Ditko, one of the original "Spider-Man" artists, and Frank Miller, the creator of "Batman: Legend of the Dark Night."
BOOKS
December 1, 1991 | Lee Wochner
Let's be honest: More of us have read Spider-Man comics than will ever finish "Pride and Prejudice." What is the secret of Marvel Comics' widespread popularity and lasting appeal? According to Les Daniels, it's the personalities of the heroes; that is, that they have them at all. In the 1960s, when Marvel was at a low point creatively and economically, writer/editor Stan Lee hit on an idea: humanizing the superhuman.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 29, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
Romance and empathy are all very nice, but comic-book movies cry out for exceptional villains, and "Spider-Man 2" has come up with a memorable one. In bringing to vivid and extravagant life Dr. Otto Octavius, the ever-menacing Doc Ock, Spider-Man's nemesis since the comic's earliest days, this energetic sequel has taken the scenario that made the first film successful and turned it inside out.
BOOKS
June 22, 2008 | Geoff Boucher, Geoff Boucher is a Times staff writer.
TWO WEEKS ago, at a cafe in San Francisco, I found myself across a table from Frank Miller, the most important comic book artist of the last 25 years. I was there to interview him about his shift to Hollywood filmmaking, but the conversation was derailed when I mentioned I was reading Blake Bell's "Strange and Stranger: The World of Steve Ditko." A look of alarm and intrigue ran across Miller's face. He put down his drink and leaned forward. "What does it say? Tell me!"
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2002
Your article about Spider-Man's co-creator, Steve Ditko, a truly remarkable comic book writer-artist, was one of the best researched, most thoughtful articles I've ever read ("Spider-Man's Long-Lost Parent," by Jordan Raphael, April 29). Even more amazing is the fact that, although I've been a fan of Ditko's work for 35 years, this is the first time I've ever seen a clear photograph of him. If you had published a close-up photo of the Loch Ness Monster or the Abominable Snowman, I doubt I would have been any more bowled over.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 2002 | JORDAN RAPHAEL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When "Spider-Man" credits roll on Friday, a name will appear alongside Stan Lee's that may elicit wild cheering from a few audience members and muted confusion from everyone else. The name is Steve Ditko. And the people applauding are comic-book fans thrilled that Ditko, the original artist and co-creator of Spider-Man, has been given proper credit--at long last--on the occasion of Spidey's big-screen debut. Ditko won't be anywhere in the vicinity of the movie's hype machine, though.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2002 | SUSAN KING, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three home entertainment companies are jumping on the web in hopes of cashing in on the enormous interest and hype surrounding Sam Raimi's big-screen version of "Spider-Man," opening in theaters today. On Tuesday, Buena Vista released on DVD ($20) and VHS ($15) the very entertaining "Spider-Man: The Ultimate Villain Showdown," which features four animated adventures from the 1995 series starring everyone's favorite wall-crawling superhero.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 2002 | ALFONSO A. CASTILLO, NEWSDAY
John Buscema, a revered comic book illustrator whose pencil breathed life into Spider-Man, the Mighty Thor and Conan the Barbarian for a half century, died Jan. 10 in Port Jefferson, N.Y., after a bout with stomach cancer. He was 74. 'There are very few people in our industry who have escalated to living legend status. John is among those few people," said Joe Quesada, editor in chief of Marvel Comics.
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