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Steve E Lewis

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NEWS
January 20, 1996 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It will take months to determine whether Orange County prosecutors should be disqualified from the bankruptcy-related misconduct cases against two of the county's supervisors and its auditor. A Los Angeles County judge handling the case set April 15 as the date to hear a bid by Supervisors Roger R. Stanton and William G. Steiner and Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis to remove the district attorney on grounds that prosecutors have a conflict of interest.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1997 | From Associated Press
The state Supreme Court refused Wednesday to reinstate the Orange County district attorney's office as the county's lawyer in a bankruptcy-related civil suit against County Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis. The suit seeks to remove Lewis from office. A state appeals court ruled in March that Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi's office had an apparent conflict of interest and must be removed from the suit. The state's high court unanimously denied review of the case Wednesday.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1997 | From Associated Press
The state Supreme Court refused Wednesday to reinstate the Orange County district attorney's office as the county's lawyer in a bankruptcy-related civil suit against County Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis. The suit seeks to remove Lewis from office. A state appeals court ruled in March that Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi's office had an apparent conflict of interest and must be removed from the suit. The state's high court unanimously denied review of the case Wednesday.
NEWS
May 3, 1997 | GREG HERNANDEZ and SHELBY GRAD and DAVAN MAHARAJ, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Matthew R. Raabe, the former assistant county treasurer briefly hailed as a hero and then quickly labeled a villain after Orange County's 1994 financial collapse, was convicted Friday of misappropriating public funds and securities fraud related to the county's bankruptcy. His conviction on five separate felony counts could make Raabe the first Orange County official to face a prison sentence for crimes arising from the county's record-setting bankruptcy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
County supervisors will decide next week whether to authorize an additional $805,418 in defense funding to three central figures facing civil or criminal charges related to the bankruptcy. The Board of Supervisors already has allocated $1.3 million in taxpayer money to cover the legal costs. But the defendants said they have exceeded their spending caps and need additional funds as their cases move forward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1996 | DAVAN MAHARAJ and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One of Los Angeles County's most battle-tested judges was appointed Thursday to handle the bankruptcy-related misconduct cases against two Orange County supervisors and the county's auditor. Superior Court Judge John W. Ouderkirk was assigned to the case one day after all Orange County judges were disqualified from the cases because of the appearance of conflicts of interest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 4, 1996 | DAVAN MAHARAJ and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
All of Orange County's judges were disqualified Wednesday from hearing bankruptcy-related misconduct cases against two supervisors and the county's auditor-controller because of the appearance of conflicts of interest. Superior Court Presiding Judge Theodore Millard said local judges who have a brewing legal battle with the county over court funding might not seem impartial in handling cases against county officials who control their purse strings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Expressing concern over the escalating cost of defending three top county officials, the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday rejected a request to double one official's spending cap to $500,000 and instead approved a more modest increase of $50,000. The move means that taxpayers will cover at least $300,000 in legal bills for Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis, who along with Supervisors William G. Steiner and Roger R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1996 | MATT LAIT and MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Defense attorneys on Tuesday accused Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi of making improper contact with a county supervisor before a crucial vote on whether taxpayers should pick up the legal bills of three elected officials charged with misconduct. Hours before the Dec. 20 vote, Capizzi called Supervisor Don Saltarelli to explain the nature of the charges he has leveled at Supervisors Roger R. Stanton and William G. Steiner and at Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Of the four county officials receiving public funds to defend themselves against bankruptcy-related charges, Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis has kept by far the lowest profile. While former Budget Director Ronald S. Rubino heavily lobbied supervisors to pay his legal fees and assembled an army of volunteers to do legal legwork, Lewis stayed out of the spotlight. He didn't even make a personal appeal before the board until this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After twice rejecting his pleas for more money, the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday voted to more than double the defense spending cap of Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis, the only remaining county official facing bankruptcy-related charges. The 3-2 decision provides Lewis with up to $665,800 in defense costs, up from the previous cap of $300,000 established earlier this year. Lewis has already accumulated legal bills totaling $550,000.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Of the four county officials receiving public funds to defend themselves against bankruptcy-related charges, Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis has kept by far the lowest profile. While former Budget Director Ronald S. Rubino heavily lobbied supervisors to pay his legal fees and assembled an army of volunteers to do legal legwork, Lewis stayed out of the spotlight. He didn't even make a personal appeal before the board until this week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
County supervisors will decide next week whether to authorize an additional $805,418 in defense funding to three central figures facing civil or criminal charges related to the bankruptcy. The Board of Supervisors already has allocated $1.3 million in taxpayer money to cover the legal costs. But the defendants said they have exceeded their spending caps and need additional funds as their cases move forward.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 15, 1996 | SHELBY GRAD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Expressing concern over the escalating cost of defending three top county officials, the Board of Supervisors on Tuesday rejected a request to double one official's spending cap to $500,000 and instead approved a more modest increase of $50,000. The move means that taxpayers will cover at least $300,000 in legal bills for Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis, who along with Supervisors William G. Steiner and Roger R.
NEWS
January 20, 1996 | KEN ELLINGWOOD, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It will take months to determine whether Orange County prosecutors should be disqualified from the bankruptcy-related misconduct cases against two of the county's supervisors and its auditor. A Los Angeles County judge handling the case set April 15 as the date to hear a bid by Supervisors Roger R. Stanton and William G. Steiner and Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis to remove the district attorney on grounds that prosecutors have a conflict of interest.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 10, 1996 | MATT LAIT and MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Defense attorneys on Tuesday accused Dist. Atty. Michael R. Capizzi of making improper contact with a county supervisor before a crucial vote on whether taxpayers should pick up the legal bills of three elected officials charged with misconduct. Hours before the Dec. 20 vote, Capizzi called Supervisor Don Saltarelli to explain the nature of the charges he has leveled at Supervisors Roger R. Stanton and William G. Steiner and at Auditor-Controller Steve E. Lewis.
NEWS
December 24, 1994 | JODI WILGOREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve E. Lewis has worked his entire adult life in the same office. He started in 1965 as a bottom-rung accountant in the Orange County auditor-controller's office, earning $545 a month. For the past decade, he has been the auditor-controller himself, now commanding $104,582 a year--16 times his original salary.
NEWS
January 7, 1996 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Within hours of last week's decision that local judges would be barred from hearing misconduct cases stemming from the Orange County bankruptcy, the Los Angeles County judiciary was ordered to find a replacement. The presiding judge of the Superior Court huddled with the supervising judge of the Criminal Court. They studied crowded court calendars. They debated the legal complexities of the Orange County cases. They weighed the intense media interest. They sought the coolest head around.
NEWS
January 7, 1996 | MARK PLATTE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Within hours of last week's decision that local judges would be barred from hearing misconduct cases stemming from the Orange County bankruptcy, the Los Angeles County judiciary was ordered to find a replacement. The presiding judge of the Superior Court huddled with the supervising judge of the Criminal Court. They studied crowded court calendars. They debated the legal complexities of the Orange County cases. They weighed the intense media interest. They sought the coolest head around.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1996 | DAVAN MAHARAJ and MATT LAIT, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One of Los Angeles County's most battle-tested judges was appointed Thursday to handle the bankruptcy-related misconduct cases against two Orange County supervisors and the county's auditor. Superior Court Judge John W. Ouderkirk was assigned to the case one day after all Orange County judges were disqualified from the cases because of the appearance of conflicts of interest.
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