Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSteve Earle
IN THE NEWS

Steve Earle

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2011
BOOKS Steve Earle is a Renaissance man, but the kind with dirt under his nails and a raspy voice that sounds like it's seen the apocalypse and lived to tell the tale. The singer-songwriter, actor, activist, playwright and author of the story collection "Doghouse Roses" will read and sign his latest book, "I'll Never Get Out of This World Alive. " Patti Smith says the novel is "like a dream you can't shake, offering beauty and remorse, redemption in spades. " Bootleg Theater, 2220 Beverly Blvd.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013
With a bio that's often read like a tragic country song, the Texas singer-songwriter Steve Earle has pulled his act together in recent years and regained a lot of the footing he'd lost after starting out so promisingly a quarter-century ago as one of the most acclaimed young writers of his era. Earle is back to relying on his own pen in one of his strongest collections of songs, full of sharply etched observations on mortality, faith, the dirty side...
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2011 | By David L Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
It's tempting to read Steve Earle's first novel, "I'll Never Get Out of This World Alive" (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 256 pp., $26, forthcoming in May), through the filter of pop music; the title comes from a Hank Williams song. Yet while Williams' ghost plays a significant role in the narrative, the motivation, Earle explains, is more complex. "It's about mortality," the singer-songwriter says by phone from his New York apartment. Hence, the name of the book, a reference to the last song Williams released before he died on Jan. 1, 1953, in the back seat of a car, on the road to a New Year's Day gig in Canton, Ohio.
HEALTH
August 24, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Musician Steve Earle has announced he will write two books for publisher Twelve: a novel and a memoir. A memoir, he admits, was not something he'd been planning. “It's the book I swore I would never write - I'm writing a memoir," Earle told theMusic.co.au . Earle's past includes Grammy awards, acting, addiction and a stint in prison. His politics -- anti-war, anti-death penalty -- have made it into his songs. He's also a novelist; his first book, "I'll Never Get Out of This World Alive" was published last year.
HEALTH
August 24, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Musician Steve Earle has announced he will write two books for publisher Twelve: a novel and a memoir. A memoir, he admits, was not something he'd been planning. “It's the book I swore I would never write - I'm writing a memoir," Earle told theMusic.co.au . Earle's past includes Grammy awards, acting, addiction and a stint in prison. His politics -- anti-war, anti-death penalty -- have made it into his songs. He's also a novelist; his first book, "I'll Never Get Out of This World Alive" was published last year.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2009 | Randy Lewis
There's a bit of Br'er Rabbit and the briar patch aspect to Steve Earle's current album, "Townes," his tribute to fellow Texas singer and songwriter Townes Van Zandt. Fans who turn out to see him, like those at the Troubadour on Saturday for the second of his three nights at the West Hollywood club, shout any number of requests for Earle's own songs, but he keeps returning to the songs by his youthful hero, who later turned into his mentor. After all, he has to do his duty and promote the album, right?
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2010
SERIES Demons: While investigating a strange murder in the capital with Galvin (Philip Glenister), Mina (Zoe Tapper) has a startling premonition of Luke's (Christian Cooke) death in this new episode (6 and 9 p.m. BBC America). 48 Hours Mystery: This new episode details the case of a 911 operator who went missing (10 p.m. CBS). Four Weddings: Four brides agree to be guests at each other's nuptials then score which wedding was the best (10 p.m. TLC)
ENTERTAINMENT
January 10, 2013
With a bio that's often read like a tragic country song, the Texas singer-songwriter Steve Earle has pulled his act together in recent years and regained a lot of the footing he'd lost after starting out so promisingly a quarter-century ago as one of the most acclaimed young writers of his era. Earle is back to relying on his own pen in one of his strongest collections of songs, full of sharply etched observations on mortality, faith, the dirty side...
MAGAZINE
October 28, 2001
I wanted to express my appreciation for your excellent article on Steve Earle ("Uncontainable," by Terry McDermott, Sept. 23). I have to admit that I fell in love with his music when I heard "Fearless Heart," so I think I can attest to his reasoning that it's a chick song. Of course, my love for his music did not stop there. Thank you for sharing with us this man's journey, thoughts and works. In these compelling times, it's comforting to listen to the beauty of his words and feel a little more human.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 1, 1989 | ROBERT HILBURN
Good news: Steve Earle demonstrated Thursday night at the Coach House in San Juan Capistrano that he is on the way back artistically. That declaration may puzzle those fans who don't believe the Texas-spawned country-rocker has ever been away, but Earle's two albums since "Guitar Town" have lacked the warm, original tone of that highly acclaimed 1986 debut.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 28, 2012 | By August Brown
The Occupy movement galvanized protest singers to assemble in public spaces and shout their grievances last year. In Los Angeles, the potential arrival of a ChinatownWal-Martmay do the same. Wal-Marthas already begun construction on the controversial store at Grand Avenue and Cesar A. Chavez Boulevard, but this Saturday a bevy of union organizers and local and national acts known for social activism will lead what they're billing as "the largest protest against Wal-Mart ever held in the U.S. " Acts that include Rage Against the Machine guitarist Tom Morello and adventurous folkie Ben Harper (who headlines the Hollywood Bowl the next night)
ENTERTAINMENT
September 26, 2011
MOVIES Woman With Flowers One of five unfinished experimental works left behind when filmmaker Chick Strand died in 2009, "Woman With Flowers" (Senora Con Flores) was recently completed under the supervision of the Academy Film Archive. The movie will screen as part of a program of Strand's work, including "Waterfall," "Mosori Monika" and "Kristallnacht. " REDCAT, 631 W. 2nd St., L.A. 8:30 p.m. $10. (213) 237-2800. Redcat.org. BOOKS Charles C. Mann The bestselling science writer and historian discusses his newest book with journalist Richard Rodriguez.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 2011
FRIDAY Vampire Lounge 9865 S. Santa Monica Blvd. Noon-2 a.m. (310) 826-7473 SATURDAY Wanda Sykes Long Beach Performing Arts Center, 300 E. Ocean Blvd., Long Beach 8 p.m. $30-$105 (562) 436-3661 SATURDAY "The Shining" Hollywood Forever Cemetery, 6000 Santa Monica Blvd. 7 p.m. $10 Cinespia.org SUNDAY Steve Earle reading Bootleg Theater, 2220 Beverly Blvd. 5 p.m. $10 Skylightbooks.com SUNDAY Beverly Hills Beer Festival Thompson Hotel, 9360 Wilshire Blvd.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 19, 2011
BOOKS Steve Earle is a Renaissance man, but the kind with dirt under his nails and a raspy voice that sounds like it's seen the apocalypse and lived to tell the tale. The singer-songwriter, actor, activist, playwright and author of the story collection "Doghouse Roses" will read and sign his latest book, "I'll Never Get Out of This World Alive. " Patti Smith says the novel is "like a dream you can't shake, offering beauty and remorse, redemption in spades. " Bootleg Theater, 2220 Beverly Blvd.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 6, 2011 | By David L Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
It's tempting to read Steve Earle's first novel, "I'll Never Get Out of This World Alive" (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt: 256 pp., $26, forthcoming in May), through the filter of pop music; the title comes from a Hank Williams song. Yet while Williams' ghost plays a significant role in the narrative, the motivation, Earle explains, is more complex. "It's about mortality," the singer-songwriter says by phone from his New York apartment. Hence, the name of the book, a reference to the last song Williams released before he died on Jan. 1, 1953, in the back seat of a car, on the road to a New Year's Day gig in Canton, Ohio.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 20, 2011 | By Holly Gleason, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When Colin Gilmore was 8, he remembers his father, Jimmie Dale Gilmore, coming to Lubbock, Texas, to play ? and being on the local news. "He'd moved to Austin by then, so it was good to see my dad, but strange he was on TV. There was no notion he was gonna be a Texas legend, so we were all surprised," the son says, marveling at the gap between his sense of a parent and the public perception. Gilmore's father ? like his mom and their friends ? played music. That's just what they did; the trail-blazing wasn't planned.
NEWS
May 2, 2002 | STEVE APPLEFORD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The road makes sense to Steve Earle. He's spent time there as a traveling musician, and he has been drawn to the romance of escape since his first comical attempts at riding the rails of Texas at age 13. "I don't believe in cruise control," the singer-songwriter declared Tuesday at the Knitting Factory, reading from a poem that name-dropped Jack Kerouac and celebrated old-school driving skills.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1990 | CHRIS WILLMAN
Whether singing the praises of being a "Regular Guy" and "Good Ol' Boy" or from the points of view of garage mechanics and Death Row inmates, Steve Earle asserts his Populism almost as regularly as Hank Williams Jr. asserts his lineage. That he managed to still seem like the down-to-earth, authentic item amid all this protesting-too-much Sunday at the Roxy was a triumph of feeling over imagination.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|