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FOOD
December 29, 1999
"I had a wine from the south of France from a place called Palette. It was a '94 Chateau Simone red wine, made mostly from Mourvedre grapes. It was a beautiful wine, drinking very nicely. It was a wonderful example of what a tremendous grape Mourvedre is. The wine exhibited all the neat things Mourvedre is known for--almost an animal character--as well as the smells of raw meat, blood and iodine. But it also had some fruit--black raspberry, cranberry and plum."
ARTICLES BY DATE
FOOD
April 23, 2003 | Rod Smith, Special to The Times
Steve Edmunds had the voice, lyrical sense and guitar chops to have a shot at a singer-songwriter career. Instead, he devoted himself to playing the nuances of wine grapes. And over the last 20 years, he has become an icon of California's alternative wine scene. He's one of the original Rhone Rangers -- a loose coalition of American winemakers dedicated to the classic grape varieties of France's Rhone Valley. The half-dozen wines he bottles under the Edmunds St.
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FOOD
April 23, 2003 | Rod Smith, Special to The Times
Steve Edmunds had the voice, lyrical sense and guitar chops to have a shot at a singer-songwriter career. Instead, he devoted himself to playing the nuances of wine grapes. And over the last 20 years, he has become an icon of California's alternative wine scene. He's one of the original Rhone Rangers -- a loose coalition of American winemakers dedicated to the classic grape varieties of France's Rhone Valley. The half-dozen wines he bottles under the Edmunds St.
FOOD
December 29, 1999
"I had a wine from the south of France from a place called Palette. It was a '94 Chateau Simone red wine, made mostly from Mourvedre grapes. It was a beautiful wine, drinking very nicely. It was a wonderful example of what a tremendous grape Mourvedre is. The wine exhibited all the neat things Mourvedre is known for--almost an animal character--as well as the smells of raw meat, blood and iodine. But it also had some fruit--black raspberry, cranberry and plum."
FOOD
July 9, 1997
Steve Edmunds, Edmunds-St. John. "I was in the Piedmont last summer visiting a number of producers, but did not see Domenico Clerico while I was there. I did buy a bottle of his 1995 Dolcetto d'Alba when I got back to the Bay Area and I thought it was so marvelous I went back and bought a case. To me, it is classic Dolcetto. It has a very pure, true black cherry smell and taste that is just marvelous. It's very compelling; it just makes you want to drink more. And it's lovely with food."
BUSINESS
July 5, 2007 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
Wine merchant Randy Kemner is tickled pink about rose. Sales of blush vintages at his Wine Country store in Signal Hill are running 43% ahead of last year. Thanks go to customers such as Tom Reep, 52, of Long Beach, who are starting to purchase dry rose after tiring of longtime summer standby Chardonnay.
FOOD
July 4, 2001 | CHARLES E. OLKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most of us drink wine soon after we buy it. Even bottles that could easily age for years if safely stored in the cool, dark recesses of a traditional wine cellar--something that few of us who live in California ranch houses have ever seen--tend to be consumed rather quickly. There is nothing wrong with drinking wine whenever you feel like it, but there can be substantial benefits to laying some bottles away (even in the bottom of a dark closet) for some future enjoyment.
FOOD
May 18, 2005 | Patrick J. Comiskey, Special to The Times
It's safe to say that the Hospice du Rhone is the only major wine festival in the world that kicks off with a bowling tournament. And the bowling -- between glasses of Cote Rotie, Pic St. Loup and Aussie old-vine Grenache, or local Syrahs and Grenache roses (or bottles of Corona and the occasional shots of Hornitos) -- is extremely competitive. Participating wineries routinely bring in hotshot bowlers to work harvest just so they can gain an upper hand at the tournament the following spring.
FOOD
September 9, 2010 | By Patrick Comiskey, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The lower end of the U.S. wine market is a fairly stratified affair, with big players making wines for the masses in mass quantities sufficient to supply a huge national pipeline. But so often these wines have a cookie-cutter, concocted feel to them, or worse, they're guilty of being unspeakably drab. Let's state the obvious: Most cheap wine tastes cheap. Not for nothing has the category earned the brusquely dismissive moniker "plonk. " No one hates plonk more than winemakers, who, the same as everyone else in the world, want affordable wines to drink with their midweek meal, something simple, satisfying and authentic — wines to enjoy and not ponder.
FOOD
July 5, 2006 | Patrick Comiskey, Special to The Times
YOU'VE dusted off the cooler and cleared a rack in the fridge for the cool beverages of summer. Now what do you stock them with? Light beers, for sure, not the calorically challenged type, but the Pilseners, the Weissbiers, even a can of Tecate or two for emergencies. You're backing these up with light, crisp, high-acid white wines and refreshing and cheerily hued roses from Spain and the south of France. But don't neglect to reserve a little real estate for red wine.
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