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Steve Edwards

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 22, 1985
Television performer Steve Edwards suffered minor facial injuries in a freak traffic accident near his Encino home Monday when a plank of wood fell off a pickup truck and crashed through the window of his car, police said. A spokesman for UCLA Medical Center, where the television personality was treated, said a plastic surgeon was called in to stitch up a cut near Edwards' lip.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2013 | By Greg Braxton
Julie Chang, an anchor and entertainment reporter for KTTV Fox 11's "Good Day L.A.," has been put on medical leave as she prepares for an operation for a brain tumor. A CT scan revealed the tumor about two months after Chang was hit in the eye by her surfboard. Though she continued to appear on air and joked about the accident, she also was experiencing severe headaches. "If I hadn't moved to Southern California, I wouldn't have taken up surfing, which, in a way may have saved my life," Chang said in a message to viewers read by anchor Steve Edwards.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1994 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He can astutely discuss the effect that Martin Luther and the Reformation had on the development of Catholicism in the United States, and yet Steve Edwards' own 15-year-old daughter says, "My dad's the guy who does the cooking show."
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 2010
The estate of Michael Jackson is taking issue with a documentary to debut in Japan on the anniversary of the pop star's death Friday. According to a promotional website, the film was shot by Marc Schaffel, a former associate who had a major falling-out with Jackson in a messy trial in which they sued each other four years ago. In a statement sent to the Associated Press on Thursday, the estate says the film's promoters "misled Michael Jackson's...
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a boy growing up in the Bronx, Steve Edwards acted out his deepest ambition regularly while attending Yankee games. Fairly brimming with baseball trivia and commentary, he pretended to be the play-by-play announcer. Those play-acting days are long gone. Now, Edwards--best known for hosting "A.M. Los Angeles" for seven years with a constantly changing stable of attractive, chatty sidekicks--is the star of his own sports talk show on KABC-AM (790).
NEWS
May 19, 1985
Steve Edwards is overexposed. With would-be broadcasters abundant in Los Angeles, why is he the host of "A.M. Los Angeles," "Three-Three-O," "Hollywood Closeup," Oscar previews, etc.? Edwards isn't unique. ABC, promote new talent! Ann Holmes, Los Angeles
NEWS
May 1, 1988
I was terribly disappointed in the pre-Oscar show on Channel 7. Steve Edwards always has been one of my favorite hosts, but I can't believe the producers would team him up with Tawny Little. She stepped on his lines and interviews all evening. Every time he started talking, she pushed in and talked right over him. Nina Mangrich, Pomona
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1985
Since when has Calendar been a forum for personal attacks? I find the derogatory language in Tom Matthews' letter (May 19) concerning "Hollywood Closeup's" Cynthia Allison and Steve Edwards very offensive. "Hollywood Closeup" has always been informative and entertaining, never resorting to vicious name calling or slander to get attention. Matthews can take a cue from Cynthia and Steve on graciousness, good manners and class. KENT YEE Pasadena
ENTERTAINMENT
June 16, 1985
In regard to offensive talk shows, "A.M. Los Angeles" wins hands down. What a bore for anyone with a brain! Steve Edwards and Cristina Ferrare are so wrapped up in their egos. Cristina hogs the cameras, doesn't pay attention to the guests, needs the camera crew to cheer for every inane remark she makes and interrupts everyone--even herself. Steve, who has a need to be Mr. Sincerity (barf) when he isn't gushing over Cristina, spends half the show telling the viewer how cool he is. Spare us. You wonder why he ever left "2 on the Town" for this trash!
NEWS
September 15, 1985
Thank goodness Phyllis George has finally left the television airwaves. We have suffered long enough with lightweight comments and inane remarks on her sports and news segments. Now if Cristina Ferrare would leave the television hosting to someone capable and competent, it would make my day. Her frequent adolescent behavior and comments (I suppose they are her attempts at humor) on "A.M. Los Angeles" get on my nerves. She even has Steve Edwards, who I admired so much when he was on Channel 2, acting like her at times.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 2000 | ALEX KATZ, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An Orange County sheriff's deputy injured last week when a car broadsided his motorcycle at an Aliso Viejo intersection has died, officials said Sunday. Steve Edward Parsons, 36, died at 9:47 p.m. Saturday at Mission Hospital Regional Medical Center after his family decided to remove him from life-support systems, sheriff's officials said. Parsons had been in a medically induced coma since the June 19 accident while doctors operated to reduce swelling and bruising on his brain.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2000 | ALEX KATZ and JACK LEONARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An Orange County sheriff's deputy described by colleagues as a hard-working family man lay in critical condition Monday after an elderly motorist drove through a red light in Aliso Viejo and broadsided his motorcycle, sending him hurtling more than 60 feet through the air. Deputy Steve Edward Parsons, the father of two small children and a 10-year department veteran, suffered serious brain trauma and an array of broken bones in the 10:18 a.m. crash, officials said. "It was very bad.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1995 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
This is where television shines. As the body count from the Oklahoma City bombing rises, so does the number of human interest stories on television--stories of death, stories of despair, stories of survival, stories of hope, stories of generosity, stories of heroism, stories of anger about a slaughter of innocents so heinous as to be inexplicable to the rational mind. Americans don't need much prodding to rally around victims of tragedy.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1994 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
He can astutely discuss the effect that Martin Luther and the Reformation had on the development of Catholicism in the United States, and yet Steve Edwards' own 15-year-old daughter says, "My dad's the guy who does the cooking show."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1993
It's the end of an era with psychiatrist Dr. David Viscott's announcement that he is leaving KABC Radio ("Radio Therapist David Viscott Leaving KABC After 13 Years," April 14). KABC seems to be working overtime to compete with KFI Radio; fortunately the 50-something Viscott didn't change his style and personality to do that. Not so with the 50-something Michael Jackson and Steve Edwards. Much of the time they seem to be hyper and controlling (interrupting); trying to be controversial or trying to create it when it doesn't exist, or trying to be thirty-something!
ENTERTAINMENT
December 2, 1992 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
KABC-AM(790) radio has some interesting talkers, but none more so than Steve Edwards. Shocking? No. Compared to sizzling, sordid Howard Stern, Edwards is comatose. Pull the plug and let him die with dignity, his detractors would probably say. Yet. . . . Bumped from KABC-AM's coveted afternoon drive-time slot by glibber, glossier Peter Tilden in the station's latest upheaval, Edwards remains sneaky smart from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 1993
It's the end of an era with psychiatrist Dr. David Viscott's announcement that he is leaving KABC Radio ("Radio Therapist David Viscott Leaving KABC After 13 Years," April 14). KABC seems to be working overtime to compete with KFI Radio; fortunately the 50-something Viscott didn't change his style and personality to do that. Not so with the 50-something Michael Jackson and Steve Edwards. Much of the time they seem to be hyper and controlling (interrupting); trying to be controversial or trying to create it when it doesn't exist, or trying to be thirty-something!
ENTERTAINMENT
August 8, 1991 | CLAUDIA PUIG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As a boy growing up in the Bronx, Steve Edwards acted out his deepest ambition regularly while attending Yankee games. Fairly brimming with baseball trivia and commentary, he pretended to be the play-by-play announcer. Those play-acting days are long gone. Now, Edwards--best known for hosting "A.M. Los Angeles" for seven years with a constantly changing stable of attractive, chatty sidekicks--is the star of his own sports talk show on KABC-AM (790).
NEWS
May 1, 1988
I was terribly disappointed in the pre-Oscar show on Channel 7. Steve Edwards always has been one of my favorite hosts, but I can't believe the producers would team him up with Tawny Little. She stepped on his lines and interviews all evening. Every time he started talking, she pushed in and talked right over him. Nina Mangrich, Pomona
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