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Steve Fleischli

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2003 | Martha Groves, Times Staff Writer
Coots, white egrets, hummingbirds and great blue herons lately have made a springtime home of a freshwater marsh created by the builders of the Playa Vista development near Marina del Rey. When the marsh opens to the public Saturday, it will mark a watershed, after nearly two decades of protests and lawsuits over coastal Los Angeles' last large undeveloped property.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2003 | Martha Groves, Times Staff Writer
Coots, white egrets, hummingbirds and great blue herons lately have made a springtime home of a freshwater marsh created by the builders of the Playa Vista development near Marina del Rey. When the marsh opens to the public Saturday, it will mark a watershed, after nearly two decades of protests and lawsuits over coastal Los Angeles' last large undeveloped property.
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MAGAZINE
February 18, 2001 | JIM BENNING, Jim Benning last wrote for the magazine about the Surfrider Foundation
Steve Fleischli loves few things more than clean, clear water, the stuff known to habitues of the High Sierra and the South Pacific. But there isn't much of the stuff in Los Angeles, so Fleischli has devoted himself to cleaning up dirty water laden with copper, lead, nickel and zinc residue; foamy ocean water strewn with fast-food wrappers and soda cans; rain runoff loaded with thousands of cigarette butts.
MAGAZINE
February 18, 2001 | JIM BENNING, Jim Benning last wrote for the magazine about the Surfrider Foundation
Steve Fleischli loves few things more than clean, clear water, the stuff known to habitues of the High Sierra and the South Pacific. But there isn't much of the stuff in Los Angeles, so Fleischli has devoted himself to cleaning up dirty water laden with copper, lead, nickel and zinc residue; foamy ocean water strewn with fast-food wrappers and soda cans; rain runoff loaded with thousands of cigarette butts.
OPINION
March 20, 2002
In "Cities Exaggerate Cost of Water Cleanup" (Opinion, March 10), David Beckman, Mark Gold and Steve Fleischli claim that over 50 cities and the County of Los Angeles "exaggerate" the cost of the Los Angeles Regional Water Quality Control Board's new storm water regulations. On the contrary, the only exaggeration is in the actual benefits of these ill-conceived rules. The water board failed to conduct the state-required economic analysis prior to adopting these regulations. The chief legislative analyst of the city of Los Angeles did that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 25, 1997
State legislators and environmental groups gathered on the Santa Monica Pier on Wednesday to urge Gov. Pete Wilson to sign seven bills they said will protect public health and coastal ecology. State Sen.
MAGAZINE
March 25, 2001
Jim Benning's fine article on the work of Steve Fleischli and Santa Monica BayKeeper is especially timely ("Able to Collect Toxic Residue in a Single Bound!" Feb. 18). The Maine Legislature is now considering a proposal by state Rep. Joseph Brooks for smokers to pay a $1 surchage on a pack of 20 cigarettes and redeem five cents for every cigarette butt saved and turned in. Aside from keeping our environment from looking like a giant ashtray and avoiding cigarette butt runoff into our ocean, this would be a vast improvement to our aquatic wildlife's present-day diet.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 2014 | Chris Megerian
SACRAMENTO -- With every part of California suffering from the drought, Gov. Jerry Brown issued a new executive order on Friday in an attempt to provide some relief from the persistent dry conditions across the state. Brown's actions run the gamut from suspending some environmental regulations to asking restaurants to stop serving diners water unless they ask for it. He also ordered homeowners associations to stop fining residents for failing to water their lawns. During a speech at an environmental sustainability conference in Brentwood, Brown said he was calling on all Californians and municipal water agencies “to do everything humanly possible to conserve.” “Our fire seasons are longer, and the dry season is upon us, so we have to take renewed vigilance,” he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1998 | JULIA SCHEERES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
An ambitious plan to prevent further contamination of Santa Monica Bay--one of the most polluted stretches of coastal water in the state--has foundered because of lack of funding, according to a study released Tuesday. Only 11 of 74 priority actions recommended in 1995 by the Santa Monica Bay Restoration Project--a consortium of cities, businesses, environmental groups and government agencies--have been fully implemented, the group said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2001
Thank you for recognizing the need to consider additional open space at the Ballona Wetlands ("Playa Vista's Public Role," editorial, July 16). Unfortunately, even the initial phase of the Playa Vista project will add to existing problems of congestion and habitat loss. With 8,000 residential units and 5 million square feet of commercial space slated in Phase I, Playa Vista will cause increased traffic on Lincoln Boulevard and the 405, destroy valuable wetland and upland habitat and violate water-quality standards.
NATIONAL
November 26, 2012 | By Noam N. Levey, Washington Bureau
WASHINGTON - The Environmental Protection Agency updated water quality guidelines for the nation's beaches Monday, moving in response to charges that the federal government has not done enough to protect bathers from polluted water. The new guidelines, which update standards issued in 1986, may not immediately mean safer beaches and coastal waters. States have the authority to set their own water quality standards. But federal environmental officials said they hoped the suggested guidance would prompt state leaders to toughen their own oversight of recreational waters where people swim, surf and go boating.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2013 | By Abby Sewell
A federal appeals court dealt Los Angeles County a blow on Thursday in a long-running lawsuit over storm-water pollution when it issued an opinion that the county is liable for excessively high levels. Environmental groups sued the county and its flood-control district in 2008 over pollution in the Los Angeles and San Gabriel rivers, saying the entities had violated storm-water permits based on high pollution readings at monitoring stations in the rivers. County officials argued that they are not primarily to blame, because dozens of cities discharge polluted runoff upstream from the monitoring sites.
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