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Steve Furniss

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BUSINESS
June 17, 1992 | ERIK HAMILTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In competitive swimming, as in any sport, the achievements of certain athletes give their names an almost mythic quality. An example is Steve Furniss, a former world and U.S. record holder and Olympic medal winner. The Orange County native, widely remembered for his accomplishments in the water, is now making a splash as president and owner of Tyr Sports Inc., the fastest-growing manufacturer in the competitive swimwear industry.
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BUSINESS
June 17, 1992 | ERIK HAMILTON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In competitive swimming, as in any sport, the achievements of certain athletes give their names an almost mythic quality. An example is Steve Furniss, a former world and U.S. record holder and Olympic medal winner. The Orange County native, widely remembered for his accomplishments in the water, is now making a splash as president and owner of Tyr Sports Inc., the fastest-growing manufacturer in the competitive swimwear industry.
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BUSINESS
September 14, 1994
Six people were honored Tuesday by the Orange County Board of Supervisors as Entrepreneurs of the Year. Awards went to Sherri L. Medina of South Coast Rehabilitation Services in Aliso Viejo; Mike Sweeney, Jim Sweeney and Duane Stark of Tectrix Fitness Equipment in Irvine;( Steve Furniss, founder of Tyr Sport Inc. in Huntington Beach, and Michael Brinda, founder of New Horizons Computer Learning Center in Santa Ana.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1996 | Greg Johnson
Remember the Teflon president? Well, get ready for the Teflon swimsuit. Tyr, the Huntington Beach-based swimwear manufacturer, is now marketing swimsuits with a "revolutionary" new fiber that incorporates Teflon, the stuff that was made famous in no-stick frying pans. Don't laugh. Swimmers shave their legs and don racing caps in order to improve their hydrodynamic efficiency and lop precious milliseconds off their race times. Traditional suits absorb water and cause drag, slowing swimmers down.
NEWS
June 9, 1999
19251 Dodge Lane Santa Ana 92705 (714) 730-7476 * Enrollment: 2,070 * Established: 1963 * Team name: Knights * Newspaper: Knightlife * Principal: Dan Brooks * Student president: Judd Goodman * Famous alumni: Olympic swimmers Bruce and Steve Furniss * Winning moments: Named California Distinguished School for the second time in six years; site grant provided for an after-school tutorial lab; Pride Days brought teachers, parents and students together to work on campus cleaning and gardening
SPORTS
March 27, 2008 | Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer
Never mind that backstroker Kirsty Coventry of Zimbabwe barely had time to wedge her body into the new, ultra-tightfitting swimsuit or to test the suit in warmups, let alone race conditions. Coventry, a gold medalist in the 2004 Olympic Games, hit the water that day and smashed a world record that had stood for 16 years, swimming the 200-meter backstroke in 2:06.39, which was 0.23 second faster than the storied mark. The new swimsuit? Speedo's LZR Racer.
SPORTS
July 29, 2009 | Lisa Dillman
The white puff of smoke emerged from the FINA Bureau on Tuesday and swimming's governing body immediately proclaimed at the world championships that the sport was "evolving." Never mind the matter of an undefined "transition" period, a continued time of uncertainty roiling the sport. New regulations were approved to limit the size of swimsuits and the makeup of the material, confining it to textile.
SPORTS
May 15, 2008 | Lisa Dillman, Times Staff Writer
The battle between high-tech swimsuit manufacturers TYR and Speedo has escalated in a significant way, moving from the pool deck to the legal arena. Huntington Beach's TYR Sport Inc. upped the stakes by filing suit on Monday in federal court against Warnaco Swimwear Inc., parent company of Speedo and producer of the news-making LZR Racer swimsuit. TYR did not specify the damages it was seeking but did estimate that the long-term loss to the value of its brand could reach $500,000.
SPORTS
September 4, 2000 | TIM BROWN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was the morning after, just before noon. Peter Vidmar sat alone outside his apartment in West Los Angeles. He had boosted himself up onto a cement planter. His legs dangled as he waited for his wife, Donna, to return from work and ferry him across town, back to the Olympic Village and the other athletes. It was 1984, the summer of the Los Angeles Olympic Games. But the traffic wasn't so terrible, and Vidmar wasn't at all concerned that he had to wait.
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