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Steve Glazer

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1990 | BILL BOYARSKY
Last week, the day before the election, Los Angeles City Councilman Michael Woo rehearsed a graceful speech conceding defeat of the ethics control-pay raise measure. Like all the other City Hall insiders, Woo figured Measure H was a loser. Nobody, they thought, would support ethics reform and public financing of city election campaigns if it meant a pay raise for the mayor, the City Council, the city attorney and the controller. To the insiders' amazement, Measure H won.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
Steve Glazer may represent the California Legislature's wave of the future. Then again, he may just crash on the rocks. Glazer is a moderate Democrat running for the Assembly while bucking powerful organized labor. That just is not done in California for the most part, at least successfully. A "Jerry Brown Democrat," he calls himself with some credibility. Not only was Glazer the governor's chief strategist during his lopsided election victory in 2010, he also espouses fiscal restraint like Brown.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - Most people in Molly Munger's shoes would be looking for a graceful way out - a way to join Gov. Jerry Brown, since she can't beat him. Instead, the wealthy Pasadena civil rights attorney seems to be looking for a fight, a bruiser on behalf of schoolkids. No public poll - or recent private survey that I'm aware of - shows Munger's tax initiative with any real chance of passing voters' muster in November. A recent USC-Times poll of California voters found only 32% supporting her tax-everybody proposal, with 64% opposed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2012 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
SACRAMENTO - Most people in Molly Munger's shoes would be looking for a graceful way out - a way to join Gov. Jerry Brown, since she can't beat him. Instead, the wealthy Pasadena civil rights attorney seems to be looking for a fight, a bruiser on behalf of schoolkids. No public poll - or recent private survey that I'm aware of - shows Munger's tax initiative with any real chance of passing voters' muster in November. A recent USC-Times poll of California voters found only 32% supporting her tax-everybody proposal, with 64% opposed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 23, 2013 | George Skelton, Capitol Journal
Steve Glazer may represent the California Legislature's wave of the future. Then again, he may just crash on the rocks. Glazer is a moderate Democrat running for the Assembly while bucking powerful organized labor. That just is not done in California for the most part, at least successfully. A "Jerry Brown Democrat," he calls himself with some credibility. Not only was Glazer the governor's chief strategist during his lopsided election victory in 2010, he also espouses fiscal restraint like Brown.
BUSINESS
October 24, 2013 | By Michael Hiltzik
It would take a finely tuned instrument to measure the speed with which a strike by public employees is followed by politicians calling for a ban on this fundamental right of organized labor. Sure enough, the ink wasn't dry on the settlement ending the recent strike by workers for the Bay Area Rapid Transit system when a candidate for the State Assembly spoke up . He's Steve Glazer, a Democrat running for a seat in the East Bay. "Transit is an essential public service, just like police and fire," he says.  He argues that since California bans strikes by police and firefighters, transit strikes should be banned too. That's baloney.
NEWS
September 14, 1986
A death threat prompted state Supreme Court Chief Justice Rose Bird to cancel a speech and swearing-in ceremony at the California Women Lawyers meeting in Monterey, but a spokesman said she plans to go ahead with her annual State of the Judiciary speech today at a meeting of the State Bar.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 1, 2012 | Nicholas Riccardi and Anthony York
On a recent evening, a dark sedan glided to the curb at a two-story Craftsman off Crenshaw Boulevard near the Santa Monica Freeway. It carried Gov. Jerry Brown and his top aide, fresh off a day of squiring the vice president of China around Los Angeles. The visit to the home of Joshua Pechthalt, a former social studies instructor who leads a little-known teachers union, was part of a quiet campaign to neutralize an unexpected threat to Brown's agenda: outside activists who are as eager as the governor to raise taxes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1993 | JACK CHEEVERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Rewarding his friend: One of the oldest rules in politics is: Reward your friends and punish your enemies. And to that end, Roberti's office has dispatched some high-powered political help to an old friend, Los Angeles mayoral candidate Michael Woo. Woo was on Roberti's staff for years and a number of top Roberti aides are working with Woo in his battle against super-rich lawyer-businessman Richard Riordan.
NEWS
October 21, 1988 | Keith Love
They're baaack! Five aides to state Senate President Pro Tem David A. Roberti, who had been pulled from Dukakis' California campaign, are returning to help out, according to Kathy Garmezy, a top official in the state campaign. "They're coming back and we're very pleased," said Garmezy, who was embarrassed last week when Roberti pulled his staffers after Dukakis failed to appear at a big Roberti fund-raiser in Beverly Hills.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1990 | BILL BOYARSKY
Last week, the day before the election, Los Angeles City Councilman Michael Woo rehearsed a graceful speech conceding defeat of the ethics control-pay raise measure. Like all the other City Hall insiders, Woo figured Measure H was a loser. Nobody, they thought, would support ethics reform and public financing of city election campaigns if it meant a pay raise for the mayor, the City Council, the city attorney and the controller. To the insiders' amazement, Measure H won.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1993
State Sen. David A. Roberti (D-Van Nuys) said he plans to revise his far-reaching bill to dismantle the Los Angeles Unified School District in an attempt to minimize fears voiced by opponents, including minority groups. The bill would establish a commission to break up the district into at least seven units.
NEWS
July 2, 1993 | From a Times Staff Writer
State Sen. David A. Roberti (D-Van Nuys) tucked $1 million into the new state budget to pay for the cost of a 26-member commission that he is seeking to establish to break up the Los Angeles Unified School District. Roberti's legislation to dismantle the 640,000-student district into at least seven smaller districts was approved last month by the Senate and is pending in the Assembly Education Committee.
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