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Steve Gunderson

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
To Noel Coward's "Strange, how potent cheap music is," we might add a codicil: ". . . when it's from your era." Take "Suds," the new pop-music revue at the Old Globe Theatre. It celebrates the very early '60s, the glory years of American Bandstand. Remember "Johnny Angel" and "Chapel of Love" and "Doing the Loco-Motion"?
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NEWS
August 25, 1996 | GREGG ZOROYA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Something happened just months after Steve Gunderson became the first openly gay Republican congressman by revealing his years-long romance with architect Rob Morris. Gunderson invited a close friend dying of AIDS to dinner at the exclusive Members Dining Room in the Capitol. The man was clearly failing. He had facial lesions and carried an IV pack on his back. In a few months, he would be dead.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An influential congressman said Wednesday he will propose legislation to bar support by the National Endowment for the Arts of creative work that may "deliberately denigrate" the American cultural heritage, defile "religious traditions" or could be construed as obscene or indecent. The disclosure by Rep. Paul Henry (R-Mich.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Speaker Tom Foley moved Tuesday to delay a key vote on the National Endowment for the Arts as an unexpected bipartisan partnership surfaced in support of a moderate approach to spare the NEA from severe content control restrictions. The combination of actions occurred in a quickly developing, daylong series of events that saw the emergence of a loose coalition involving Rep. Pat Williams (D-Mont.), a key leader of House arts supporters, and Rep.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Republicans, trying to fashion National Endowment for the Arts legislation that will have broad GOP appeal, unveiled a revised plan Wednesday that would require the endowment to "assure" Congress it will not support art that is obscene or offensive on religious, racial or ethnic grounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House on Wednesday ended a months-long delay in obtaining FBI clearances for the 12 members of a commission to study the National Endowment for the Arts and recommend changes in the way the arts agency operates. The action came hours after two Republican congressmen, saying the NEA is "at risk" of being put out of business by political opponents, announced alternative legislation to radically reform the way the federal government supports the arts nationwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top officials of the National Endowment for the Arts have been directed by the agency's chairman to evaluate ways the beleaguered NEA could be restructured in what may be an attempt to begin to develop a political strategy to foil reorganization imposed by Congress. But NEA Chairman John E.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1988 | NANCY CHURNIN
For most shows, a pan by the New York Times is the kiss of death. But, after getting the thumbs down from the venerable arbiter of quality in the Big Apple, "Suds" is alive and well and packing them in--at least, on weekends--in the new Off-Broadway theater Criterion Stage Left. "Last week, after the reviews, we were waiting to see what would happen that minute," said Steve Gunderson, one of three co-creators and four stars of the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Speaker Tom Foley moved Tuesday to delay a key vote on the National Endowment for the Arts as an unexpected bipartisan partnership surfaced in support of a moderate approach to spare the NEA from severe content control restrictions. The combination of actions occurred in a quickly developing, daylong series of events that saw the emergence of a loose coalition involving Rep. Pat Williams (D-Mont.), a key leader of House arts supporters, and Rep.
NEWS
August 25, 1996 | GREGG ZOROYA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Something happened just months after Steve Gunderson became the first openly gay Republican congressman by revealing his years-long romance with architect Rob Morris. Gunderson invited a close friend dying of AIDS to dinner at the exclusive Members Dining Room in the Capitol. The man was clearly failing. He had facial lesions and carried an IV pack on his back. In a few months, he would be dead.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
House Republicans, trying to fashion National Endowment for the Arts legislation that will have broad GOP appeal, unveiled a revised plan Wednesday that would require the endowment to "assure" Congress it will not support art that is obscene or offensive on religious, racial or ethnic grounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI and DAVID LAUTER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An influential congressman said Wednesday he will propose legislation to bar support by the National Endowment for the Arts of creative work that may "deliberately denigrate" the American cultural heritage, defile "religious traditions" or could be construed as obscene or indecent. The disclosure by Rep. Paul Henry (R-Mich.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Top officials of the National Endowment for the Arts have been directed by the agency's chairman to evaluate ways the beleaguered NEA could be restructured in what may be an attempt to begin to develop a political strategy to foil reorganization imposed by Congress. But NEA Chairman John E.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 17, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The White House on Wednesday ended a months-long delay in obtaining FBI clearances for the 12 members of a commission to study the National Endowment for the Arts and recommend changes in the way the arts agency operates. The action came hours after two Republican congressmen, saying the NEA is "at risk" of being put out of business by political opponents, announced alternative legislation to radically reform the way the federal government supports the arts nationwide.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 14, 1988 | NANCY CHURNIN
For most shows, a pan by the New York Times is the kiss of death. But, after getting the thumbs down from the venerable arbiter of quality in the Big Apple, "Suds" is alive and well and packing them in--at least, on weekends--in the new Off-Broadway theater Criterion Stage Left. "Last week, after the reviews, we were waiting to see what would happen that minute," said Steve Gunderson, one of three co-creators and four stars of the show.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 4, 1988 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
To Noel Coward's "Strange, how potent cheap music is," we might add a codicil: ". . . when it's from your era." Take "Suds," the new pop-music revue at the Old Globe Theatre. It celebrates the very early '60s, the glory years of American Bandstand. Remember "Johnny Angel" and "Chapel of Love" and "Doing the Loco-Motion"?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 1989 | From Associated Press
Reps. Robert S. Walker of Pennsylvania and Steve Gunderson of Wisconsin were appointed Wednesday as chief deputy whips for the House Republicans. They were chosen by Rep. Newt Gingrich of Georgia, the new minority whip.
NEWS
April 5, 1989 | From Times wire services
Reps. Robert S. Walker of Pennsylvania and Steve Gunderson of Wisconsin were appointed today as chief deputy whips for the House Republicans. They were chosen by Rep. Newt Gingrich of Georgia, the new Republican whip. Gingrich selected activist, philosophically different congressmen. Walker, from the conservative wing, is known for maneuvers on the House floor aimed at foiling Democratic initiatives.
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