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Steve Hayden

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BUSINESS
August 1, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He created one of the most talked-about TV commercials of the 1980s--a futuristic look at the year 1984 for client Apple Computer. And today, Steve Hayden is expected to be named chairman of the two West Coast offices of the giant advertising agency BBDO Worldwide. It is a newly created position at the agency. The move seems to be part of a growing trend toward boosting the status--and titles--of top creative executives at West Coast agencies.
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BUSINESS
August 1, 1990 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He created one of the most talked-about TV commercials of the 1980s--a futuristic look at the year 1984 for client Apple Computer. And today, Steve Hayden is expected to be named chairman of the two West Coast offices of the giant advertising agency BBDO Worldwide. It is a newly created position at the agency. The move seems to be part of a growing trend toward boosting the status--and titles--of top creative executives at West Coast agencies.
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BUSINESS
March 13, 1992
Gene Cameron, 46, president and chief executive of BBDO/Los Angeles, has been fired as part of a downsizing at the troubled ad agency. Steve Hayden, 44, chairman and creative head of the office, has been handed the chief executive title. The office has lost key clients over the past year--most recently the Sizzler advertising business. In the past two weeks, it has laid off 22 employees. Many of its major clients, including Apple Computer and Glendale Federal Bank, have slashed their ad budgets.
BUSINESS
June 13, 1994 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Milk got it. The "Got Milk?" commercial featuring a historian trying to talk with his mouth full of peanut butter won one of the most coveted awards in advertising Saturday night--the Clio Award for the best television commercial of 1993. And the complete ad campaign for Apple PowerBook, which features diverse people who use the same personal computer for a variety of reasons, won the Clio Award for the best multimedia ad campaign of the year.
BUSINESS
April 2, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
During a recent editorial meeting at Advertising Age, writers and editors of the trade magazine attempted to select America's "Agency of the Year." After some uninspired debate, there was stunned silence when one writer posed, "What happens if I don't vote for anyone?" Bingo. For the first time since it began handing out the honors in 1973, the magazine couldn't find a winner in 1990.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1994 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Small is getting very big in the ad business. So big, in fact, that a string of recent successes by smaller ad agencies could nudge the rest of the industry to return to its roots. Thursday night, one small agency proved--for the second consecutive year--that it ranks among the giants in Southern California. Stein Robaire Helm, a 7-year-old agency, walked off with the West Coast's premiere ad prize at the 28th annual Belding Awards.
BUSINESS
July 16, 1991 | BRUCE HOROVITZ
The image of a lone firefighter walking into the mouth of fire is a haunting one. And anyone who looks at the highly publicized poster for the Universal Studios film "Backdraft" probably believes that the studio spent a bundle-and-half to create it. Imagine the costs involved in setting a building on fire. Imagine renting the special fire resistant equipment worn by the firefighter. Keep imagining. That photo wasn't taken to market the film at all.
BUSINESS
April 15, 1993 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If advertising is geared toward the young, perhaps ad awards should be geared toward young agencies. Such was the case Wednesday night when Stein Robaire Helm, a little-known Brentwood agency that didn't even exist until five years ago--but has since helped turn Ikea into a household name in Southern California--walked off with seven of the West Coast's top ad awards. No other agency won as many.
BUSINESS
June 20, 1988 | BRUCE HOROVITZ, Times Staff Writer
An Apple Computer commercial that features a wheelchair-bound teen-ager zipping around Venice Beach took top honors at a major advertising awards ceremony Sunday night in Los Angeles. The Apple commercial, set to the tune of Randy Newman's happy-go-lucky song, "I'm Different," is in sharp contrast to the much harder edge of Apple's current ad campaign about executives in tense business situations.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2006 | Chris Gaither, Times staff writer
Ryan Lapidus didn't want to be one of those lawyers. The amateur look of most attorney ads on television had soured him on the medium for promoting Lapidus & Lapidus, the intellectual property and entertainment law firm he started in Los Angeles with his brother, Daniel. "My experience was those guys late-night -- 'I'm here to fight for you,' and 'Friends don't let friends plead guilty,' " he said. "That's so far from our practice that TV didn't even occur to me."
BUSINESS
January 1, 1992
Brandon Tartikoff, chairman, Paramount Pictures Corp., Hollywood: Personal: "To return all my phone calls, even the obscene ones." Professional: "To bring some collective sanity to the many accepted but inflationary business practices in both the film and TV industries." Irwin Jacobs, chief executive, Minstar Inc., Minneapolis: Personal: "The one wish I have is to hire back during the next 12 to 18 months all of the people we've laid off in the boating industry. That's more than 3,600 people."
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