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Steve Hodel

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November 21, 2004 | Paul Teetor
Stephen R. Kay, head deputy for L.A. County's district attorney office in Compton, has prosecuted murder cases for more than 35 years, and he says Steve Hodel has enough facts to convict his father, the late Dr. George Hodel, for at least two murders. But it wasn't easy for Kay--speaking for himself and not the D.A.'s office--to write a six-page letter to Hodel endorsing his case.
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MAGAZINE
October 8, 2006
It was surprising to read that Peter Gilstrap considers the Black Dahlia murder "still unsolved" ("On Top of the Underbelly," Sept. 17). Having met both John Gilmore and the late Dr. George Hodel, I'm convinced that the mystery was finally put to rest by former Los Angeles Police Det. Steve Hodel. His book merges personal memories with a methodical investigation of the long-cold crime to reveal a bloody history that's stranger than fiction. Let readers decide for themselves at www.blackdahliaavenger.
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BOOKS
May 25, 2003 | Gary Indiana, Gary Indiana is the author of numerous novels, including "Resentment: A Comedy" and "Do Everything in the Dark," published this month.
She came to Los Angeles during World War II from nowhere special, a pretty girl with big hair and bad teeth who liked to go to bars and nightclubs. She believed in love and romance and lived on hot dogs and Coca-Cola, lavished hours on her makeup in dollar-a-night furnished rooms. A drifter, something of a cipher, she was a person people remembered vaguely but could never quite pull into focus.
MAGAZINE
November 21, 2004 | Paul Teetor
Stephen R. Kay, head deputy for L.A. County's district attorney office in Compton, has prosecuted murder cases for more than 35 years, and he says Steve Hodel has enough facts to convict his father, the late Dr. George Hodel, for at least two murders. But it wasn't easy for Kay--speaking for himself and not the D.A.'s office--to write a six-page letter to Hodel endorsing his case.
MAGAZINE
November 21, 2004 | Paul Teetor, Paul Teetor's last story for the magazine was about a mentally ill woman charged with a hate-crime murder.
Steve Hodel is facing the ultimate crime writer's challenge: a room full of retired cops who have read his national bestseller "Black Dahlia Avenger: A Genius for Murder." As Hodel gets out of his Ford Crown Victoria, host Garland Brown, a 62-year-old former Gardena cop with 35 years in law enforcement, introduces himself. "A lot of the guys have some serious questions," he says. "They've all read the hardcover, and the paperback with the new chapter. They know what they're talking about."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2004 | Steve Lopez
"You know," James Ellroy said over the phone, "I'm the son of a murder victim." So I heard. If you know anything about Ellroy, you know that's who he is. Ellroy's mother was killed in El Monte on June 22, 1958. The unsolved case drove the lad inward, and some would say Ellroy -- the brilliant author and chronicler of death -- has never crawled free of the darkest corners of his soul. Ellroy's "L.A.
MAGAZINE
October 8, 2006
It was surprising to read that Peter Gilstrap considers the Black Dahlia murder "still unsolved" ("On Top of the Underbelly," Sept. 17). Having met both John Gilmore and the late Dr. George Hodel, I'm convinced that the mystery was finally put to rest by former Los Angeles Police Det. Steve Hodel. His book merges personal memories with a methodical investigation of the long-cold crime to reveal a bloody history that's stranger than fiction. Let readers decide for themselves at www.blackdahliaavenger.
BOOKS
June 8, 2003
Gary Indiana's review of Steve Hodel's "Black Dahlia Avenger" (Book Review, May 25) was long on imagery but woefully ignorant of the facts. I interviewed Mr. Hodel extensively for a segment that aired on "Dateline NBC" (a lengthier version is now being prepared for Court TV) and came away convinced that Hodel's version of events is at least plausible and perhaps more than that. Some of it is enough to make you stop and think -- unless, of course, you've already made up your mind. Steve Hodel recognized his father's handwriting on the notes the Dahlia's killer sent police.
MAGAZINE
December 12, 2004
Thank you for the fine story on the Black Dahlia case ("The Most Credible Story Ever Told?" by Paul Teetor, Nov. 21). Steve Hodel deserves great credit for his research into evidence showing that his father was likely the perpetrator of this crime. I hope Police Chief William Bratton will rethink his dismissive attitude about the case. Los Angeles and the world deserve to know the truth. Helen Young Pomona
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2003 | Steve Lopez
All right, so I might have said on Friday that I was going to let it rest. But now I can see that's impossible. Once you step inside the cloud of mystery surrounding the Black Dahlia murder, there's no way out. Moviemakers, amateur snoops, retired cops and a gaggle of others got in touch with me to weigh in on the most notorious unsolved murder in Los Angeles history.
MAGAZINE
November 21, 2004 | Paul Teetor, Paul Teetor's last story for the magazine was about a mentally ill woman charged with a hate-crime murder.
Steve Hodel is facing the ultimate crime writer's challenge: a room full of retired cops who have read his national bestseller "Black Dahlia Avenger: A Genius for Murder." As Hodel gets out of his Ford Crown Victoria, host Garland Brown, a 62-year-old former Gardena cop with 35 years in law enforcement, introduces himself. "A lot of the guys have some serious questions," he says. "They've all read the hardcover, and the paperback with the new chapter. They know what they're talking about."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 2004 | Steve Lopez
"You know," James Ellroy said over the phone, "I'm the son of a murder victim." So I heard. If you know anything about Ellroy, you know that's who he is. Ellroy's mother was killed in El Monte on June 22, 1958. The unsolved case drove the lad inward, and some would say Ellroy -- the brilliant author and chronicler of death -- has never crawled free of the darkest corners of his soul. Ellroy's "L.A.
BOOKS
June 8, 2003
Gary Indiana's review of Steve Hodel's "Black Dahlia Avenger" (Book Review, May 25) was long on imagery but woefully ignorant of the facts. I interviewed Mr. Hodel extensively for a segment that aired on "Dateline NBC" (a lengthier version is now being prepared for Court TV) and came away convinced that Hodel's version of events is at least plausible and perhaps more than that. Some of it is enough to make you stop and think -- unless, of course, you've already made up your mind. Steve Hodel recognized his father's handwriting on the notes the Dahlia's killer sent police.
BOOKS
May 25, 2003 | Gary Indiana, Gary Indiana is the author of numerous novels, including "Resentment: A Comedy" and "Do Everything in the Dark," published this month.
She came to Los Angeles during World War II from nowhere special, a pretty girl with big hair and bad teeth who liked to go to bars and nightclubs. She believed in love and romance and lived on hot dogs and Coca-Cola, lavished hours on her makeup in dollar-a-night furnished rooms. A drifter, something of a cipher, she was a person people remembered vaguely but could never quite pull into focus.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 2003 | Cecilia Rasmussen, Times Staff Writer
Joe Friday was a fictional detective who, on radio and television, roamed the virtual streets of Los Angeles, solving crimes and sticking to the rule book. But one character Friday relied on in the weekly television drama "Dragnet" was a civilian, Chief Forensic Specialist Raymond Pinker. Unlike Friday, Pinker was based on a real-life LAPD figure named ... Raymond Pinker.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 2003 | Steve Lopez
One year ago, a retired LAPD homicide cop approached me and said in a whisper that he had a blockbuster story in the works, but he couldn't divulge the details at the time. Last week, he got in touch again to deliver the goods. Steve Hodel, 61, said he had cracked the most notorious unsolved murder in Los Angeles history -- the case of the Black Dahlia. But it gets even better.
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