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Steve Holgate

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BUSINESS
January 19, 1997 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dolores Soderstrom's legal nightmare began innocuously enough with a routine agreement to sell two vacant lots she owned in Indio. But the deal landed the 73-year-old widow, against her will, in binding arbitration before the Southern California Arbitration Assn. Last May, an inexperienced arbitrator ordered Soderstrom to pay the putative buyer a staggering $558,000--nearly eight times the value of her properties.
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BUSINESS
January 19, 1997 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dolores Soderstrom's legal nightmare began innocuously enough with a routine agreement to sell two vacant lots she owned in Indio. But the deal landed the 73-year-old widow, against her will, in binding arbitration before the Southern California Arbitration Assn. Last May, an inexperienced arbitrator ordered Soderstrom to pay the putative buyer a staggering $558,000--nearly eight times the value of her properties.
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BUSINESS
June 6, 1997 | MYRON LEVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A multimillion-dollar fraud and racketeering suit filed in federal court in Los Angeles accuses an arbitration service and a group of lawyers and businessmen of an elaborate scheme to manufacture financial disputes and use their control over the arbitration service to extract money from adversaries. The 95-page complaint, filed this week by three Los Angeles-area landlords, claims the Southern California Arbitration Assn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 2004 | By David Kelly
After winning a City Council seat last year on a campaign of transparency and accountability, Steve Di Memmo said he quickly found himself the outsider in a clique of clubby officials who shared long-standing ties and mutual interests. But he didn't realize just how far outside he was until Thursday, when he learned he was the sole San Jacinto city councilman not facing felony indictments. The news left him torn. "These people have not been found guilty of anything yet," he said repeatedly over coffee in San Jacinto on Friday.
BUSINESS
September 11, 1995 | KAREN KAPLAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
For Aaron Williams, the decision to join the Foreign Service came on a winter day in 1976. "I was sitting in Minneapolis one cold day and I looked outside, where I couldn't even find my car in the snow," he said. "So I thought, why not?" Four months later, the former food company executive had developed a model agribusiness program in Honduras to help small farmers grow crops more efficiently and export them to the United States.
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