Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSteve Hoye
IN THE NEWS

Steve Hoye

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
May 21, 1989 | Rob Fernas
Over the long course of 28 seasons, Palos Verdes High baseball Coach Gil Eberhard has experienced his share of bitter defeats. But he couldn't remember any that hurt more than Friday's 4-3 loss to Millikan. Worse yet, he knows the pain will linger. "Unfortunately," he said, pacing in front of his dejected players, "that's the bad feature about games like this." It's the way the Sea Kings lost that will haunt Eberhard. In command most of the way, Palos Verdes let its CIF-Southern Section 5-A playoff opener slip away at Blair Field in Long Beach.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
May 21, 1989 | Rob Fernas
Over the long course of 28 seasons, Palos Verdes High baseball Coach Gil Eberhard has experienced his share of bitter defeats. But he couldn't remember any that hurt more than Friday's 4-3 loss to Millikan. Worse yet, he knows the pain will linger. "Unfortunately," he said, pacing in front of his dejected players, "that's the bad feature about games like this." It's the way the Sea Kings lost that will haunt Eberhard. In command most of the way, Palos Verdes let its CIF-Southern Section 5-A playoff opener slip away at Blair Field in Long Beach.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 1999
If The Times is interested in protecting public lands in the Sierra Nevada, as was suggested by your May 15 editorial, you should support the National Forest Protection and Restoration Act, HR 1396. NFPRA would end the logging on our national forests and other public lands. Because we spend over a billion dollars a year subsidizing national forest logging, this bill would obviously save us a great deal of money. At the same time, part of the savings would be redirected into ecological restoration and worker retraining.
MAGAZINE
June 19, 2005
In the interview with Steve Hoye regarding his coup in obtaining public access to private Malibu beach land--specifically, the sands adjacent to David Geffen's oceanfront estate--nowhere is it mentioned where the beneficiaries of his activism will park ("The People's Shoreline," by Mark Ehrman, Metropolis, May 15). The beach homes nearby are so close together that parking in front of them would block the homeowners' entry to their properties. The only alternative is the land side across busy Pacific Coast Highway--a hazardous option.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 6, 2008 | Susannah Rosenblatt
Two environmental advocacy groups filed a lawsuit Thursday against the state Coastal Commission, complaining that stone walls built by a developer at the entrance to a public trail into Bolsa Chica wetlands discouraged people from entering. The 10-foot-high wall and trellis structures built by developer Hearthside Homes are "placed up there to suggest private territory instead of the public identity they should have," said Steve Hoye, executive director of nonprofit Access for All, one of the organizations that filed the suit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 2011 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
One of California's priciest beachfronts may become a little less exclusive after a judge sided with state coastal regulators fighting to build a public pathway next to an oceanfront Malibu mansion. In a ruling made public this week Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge James C. Chalfant upheld a 2009 California Coastal Commission order telling Lisette Ackerberg to clear the way for a public walkway to Carbon Beach along the edge of her property. The decision also revealed a private settlement between Ackerberg and Access for All, a nonprofit group that works to secure access to public beaches.
SPORTS
May 11, 1990 | ROB FERNAS
In another Bay League game: Palos Verdes 11, Rolling Hills 4--Pat O'Hara and Jason Goldberg each drove in four runs and the Sea Kings roughed up Rolling Hills' ace Kirt Kishita for five runs at Palos Verdes to finish in fourth place in the Bay League. Palos Verdes (15-11, 8-6) snapped a 2-2 tie with five runs in the fifth. Four of the runs came off Kishita, who relieved starter Tristan Paul with no outs and a runner on first.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2005 | Martha Groves, Times Staff Writer
Sticklers, take note. If heading to Broad Beach in Malibu, be sure to have tide chart, tape measure and public-access map in hand if you want to be sure to plop your beach towel and boogie board in a legal zone. Without those tools, beachgoers will be pretty much at sea when it comes to sorting out the crazy quilt of public easements along the 1.1-mile stretch of prime beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 2002 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Wendy McCaw, the billionaire owner of the Santa Barbara News-Press, has paid $460,000 in fines as part of a settlement over a beach access dispute with the California Coastal Commission. The settlement, however, does not end McCaw's legal battle to block public access to a 500-foot strip of beach below her 25-acre bluff-top estate. McCaw continues to pursue a companion lawsuit to prevent Santa Barbara County from acquiring the easement it needs to open up the stretch of beach to the public.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2005 | Kenneth R. Weiss, Times Staff Writer
Record producer David Geffen has agreed to reimburse the state and a nonprofit group $300,000 in attorneys fees and costs incurred during his nearly three-year legal effort to block public beach access next to his Malibu home, state officials announced Friday. The announcement came after the 12-member California Coastal Commission voted Friday to approve the settlement of Geffen's lawsuit, and the commission's countersuit, over the pathway to Malibu's Carbon Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 2006 | Steve Lopez
As a California native, I can't help myself. Summer arrives, bringing dizzy days of sun-blasted heat, and I can't wait to sniff cool salt air and dive into a wave. But there's trouble once again along the exclusive shores of Malibu, and if it keeps up, it might be time to resurrect my plans for Sand Aid, the concert to free the beaches for one and all. No, David Geffen is not up to his old tricks.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|