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Steve Khan

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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Space Age Wes Montgomery." That's what a music writer called guitarist Steve Khan about a decade ago, and while he initially disagreed with that opinion, today he's comfortable about being linked somewhat stylistically to the great melodic guitarist.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Space Age Wes Montgomery." That's what a music writer called guitarist Steve Khan about a decade ago. Although he initially disagreed with the comment, today Khan says he affirms that stylistic link with the great melodic guitarist. And with good reason. Khan's latest album, "Headline" on Bluemoon Records, definitely qualifies as straight-ahead jazz.
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NEWS
January 28, 1993 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jazz guitarist Steve Khan grew up in the cradle of show business. His father, Sammy Cahn, was one of the most celebrated lyricists of all time, having penned countless classic songs for the likes of Frank Sinatra in his heyday, for musicals and films. Seeking to find his own identity apart from his father's considerable shadow, Steve changed the spelling of his name over 20 years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Space Age Wes Montgomery." That's what a music writer called guitarist Steve Khan about a decade ago, and while he initially disagreed with that opinion, today he's comfortable about being linked somewhat stylistically to the great melodic guitarist.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1993 | ZAN STEWART
*** Steve Khan, "Headline," Bluemoon. The leader's guitar is the only melody instrument in these trio and quartet settings, but you don't miss another horn. Khan fills up the front-line space with an expansive sound--which is sometimes bold and gritty and occasionally reveals flashes of light--and his solos are crafty. Over time, Khan's playing has become more melodic and sweet and less obtuse and vinegary.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1993 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Space Age Wes Montgomery." That's what a music writer called guitarist Steve Khan about a decade ago. Although he initially disagreed with the comment, today Khan says he affirms that stylistic link with the great melodic guitarist. And with good reason. Khan's latest album, "Headline" on Bluemoon Records, definitely qualifies as straight-ahead jazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 4, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's sad but true. Often, many out-of-town jazz artists of not-quite-star-status don't work Southern California for two reasons: They either aren't strong enough draws to play a six-night stand at a club such as Hollywood's Catalina Bar & Grill, or are too expensive for such rooms as the Jazz Bakery in Los Angeles to hire them for more than a night or two. Jim Vaughan, talent booker at Maxwell's in Huntington Beach, says he's found a way around such roadblocks.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2005 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The organ trio is one of the unique jazz ensembles. Perhaps the first in the genre to combine electric instruments -- the electric organ (almost always the Hammond B-3) and the electric guitar, along with a drum kit -- it has produced some of the music's most distinctive sounds. (Think Jimmy Smith, Groove Holmes, Larry Young, etc.).
ENTERTAINMENT
October 30, 1992 | ZAN STEWART, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's sad but true. Often, many out-of-town jazz artists of not-quite-star-status don't work Southern California for two reasons: They either aren't strong enough draws to play a six-night stand at a club like Catalina Bar & Grill, or are too expensive for such rooms as the Jazz Bakery to hire them for more than a night or two. Jim Vaughn, the man who books the talent at Maxwell's in Huntington Beach, says he's found a way around such roadblocks.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 19, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
What do you get when you put together a world-class jazz pianist-composer, a former jazz-rock drummer-producer and the president of a major entertainment entity? Not what you might expect. The partnership of Roger Kellaway, Bobby Colomby and Gary Lemel may seem to be an unlikely combination, but the results are intriguing. Lemel, who is president of music for Warner Bros. Pictures and CEO of Warner-Sunset, the company's soundtrack label, has had a parallel career as a singer for decades.
NEWS
January 28, 1993 | JOSEF WOODARD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Jazz guitarist Steve Khan grew up in the cradle of show business. His father, Sammy Cahn, was one of the most celebrated lyricists of all time, having penned countless classic songs for the likes of Frank Sinatra in his heyday, for musicals and films. Seeking to find his own identity apart from his father's considerable shadow, Steve changed the spelling of his name over 20 years ago.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 1993 | ZAN STEWART
*** Steve Khan, "Headline," Bluemoon. The leader's guitar is the only melody instrument in these trio and quartet settings, but you don't miss another horn. Khan fills up the front-line space with an expansive sound--which is sometimes bold and gritty and occasionally reveals flashes of light--and his solos are crafty. Over time, Khan's playing has become more melodic and sweet and less obtuse and vinegary.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 19, 1999
September Jack Kerouac, "Reads 'On the Road,' " Rykodisc. The Beat master himself, reading Ur-work of the '50s and singing(!) a few jazz standards. Stefon Harris, "Black Action Figure," Blue Note. Generally viewed as one of the potential jazz stars of the next century, the young vibraphonist further demonstrates his talents as a composer and improviser. Eric Dolphy, "The Illinois Concert," Blue Note.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 4, 1998 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Davy Spillane and Donal Lunny are two of the great names in contemporary Irish music. Together with Christy Moore, they founded the seminal group Moving Hearts in 1982, and both have new albums out this month. Spillane has emerged as one of the most-heard players of the now-popular Uilleann pipes (the instrument heard prominently on the "Titanic" soundtrack), and the inspiration for the music of "Riverdance" (which featured him in the initial London and U.S. runs).
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