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Steve Kloves

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2005 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
ONCE upon a time, when children knew nothing about publishing dates and the most famous wizard was Merlin, writer-director Steve Kloves was asked if he had any interest in adapting a children's book that was very popular in the United Kingdom. He was torn -- he had just finished adapting the dark literary comedy "Wonder Boys," which had been fun.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
What's the latest Harry Potter film like? If you've seen the previous six, you already know. If you haven't there's no point in trying to catch up now. It's a tribute to how much the series' true believers are being counted on to carry the film that this latest episode makes little attempt to bring newcomers up to speed about what's come before. Much of the plot of "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows" involves the attempt to find and destroy a series of Horcruxes, and if you haven't a clue about what they are or why they're important, you might as well stay home.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2005
I am writing regarding Mary McNamara's article ["The Sorceress' Apprentice," Nov. 20]. I read the article about Steve Kloves because it was about screenplay writing; I thought it was interesting regarding the subject matter. I am reading the fourth Harry Potter book and have avoided reading reviews so that I wouldn't learn the ending. I didn't think McNamara would give away the story line, let alone the ending to the sixth book. I am so upset by this. Did she really need to use that pivotal moment in the book to describe the challenges in screenplay writing?
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2010 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Reporting from Orlando, Fla. — Imagine if Peter Jackson had been able to chat with J.R.R. Tolkien while directing "The Lord of the Rings" films, or if Walt Disney had been able to run the plans for his new Captain Nemo ride by Jules Verne. The Wizarding World of Harry Potter, which opened two weeks ago at Universal Orlando Resort's Islands of Adventure, will no doubt prove to be many things to many people — a haven for die-hard Potter fans, a starting point for the uninitiated, a template for park and ride designers — but it is also a monument to speed.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Flesh and Bone" proves what "The Fabulous Baker Boys" postulated, that writer-director Steve Kloves is a bred-in-the-bone filmmaker. Up to a point. For though this finely made movie displays remarkable virtues, including the most moving performance of Dennis Quaid's career, it is also good money sent after bad, a series of impressive accomplishments recruited to serve a questionable plot.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 18, 2010 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
What's the latest Harry Potter film like? If you've seen the previous six, you already know. If you haven't there's no point in trying to catch up now. It's a tribute to how much the series' true believers are being counted on to carry the film that this latest episode makes little attempt to bring newcomers up to speed about what's come before. Much of the plot of "Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows" involves the attempt to find and destroy a series of Horcruxes, and if you haven't a clue about what they are or why they're important, you might as well stay home.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2009 | Denise Martin
Michael Gambon has played Hogwarts headmaster Albus Dumbledore for five years, but he hasn't been setting a good example for his students when it comes to finishing their homework: The beloved old wizard hasn't cracked a single one of J.K. Rowling's "Harry Potter" novels. The choice not to read Rowling's book series, he explains, is deliberate, and he points out that costars Ralph Fiennes and Alan Rickman haven't taken up the books either. "You'd get upset about all the scenes it's missing from the book, wouldn't you?"
ENTERTAINMENT
July 4, 2010 | By Mary McNamara, Los Angeles Times Television Critic
Reporting from Orlando, Fla. — Imagine if Peter Jackson had been able to chat with J.R.R. Tolkien while directing "The Lord of the Rings" films, or if Walt Disney had been able to run the plans for his new Captain Nemo ride by Jules Verne. The Wizarding World of Harry Potter, which opened two weeks ago at Universal Orlando Resort's Islands of Adventure, will no doubt prove to be many things to many people — a haven for die-hard Potter fans, a starting point for the uninitiated, a template for park and ride designers — but it is also a monument to speed.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2001 | SEAN MITCHELL, Sean Mitchell is a regular contributor to Calendar
Surely it must be easier, one could assume, to make a movie from an existing book or play than to have to come up with an original story, but talk to filmmakers who've done both and you will hear otherwise.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2009 | Denise Martin
Steve Kloves, who, with the exception of "The Order of the Phoenix," has adapted all the "Harry Potter" books for film, talks about the upcoming "Half-Blood Prince," the confrontation between Alan Rickman's Snape and Michael Gambon's Dumbledore and reveals that he created an entirely new scene: The showdown "is informed by everything [readers] have come to know is true," Kloves says.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 14, 2009 | Denise Martin
Michael Gambon has played Hogwarts headmaster Albus Dumbledore for five years, but he hasn't been setting a good example for his students when it comes to finishing their homework: The beloved old wizard hasn't cracked a single one of J.K. Rowling's "Harry Potter" novels. The choice not to read Rowling's book series, he explains, is deliberate, and he points out that costars Ralph Fiennes and Alan Rickman haven't taken up the books either. "You'd get upset about all the scenes it's missing from the book, wouldn't you?"
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2009 | Denise Martin
Steve Kloves, who, with the exception of "The Order of the Phoenix," has adapted all the "Harry Potter" books for film, talks about the upcoming "Half-Blood Prince," the confrontation between Alan Rickman's Snape and Michael Gambon's Dumbledore and reveals that he created an entirely new scene: The showdown "is informed by everything [readers] have come to know is true," Kloves says.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 27, 2005
I am writing regarding Mary McNamara's article ["The Sorceress' Apprentice," Nov. 20]. I read the article about Steve Kloves because it was about screenplay writing; I thought it was interesting regarding the subject matter. I am reading the fourth Harry Potter book and have avoided reading reviews so that I wouldn't learn the ending. I didn't think McNamara would give away the story line, let alone the ending to the sixth book. I am so upset by this. Did she really need to use that pivotal moment in the book to describe the challenges in screenplay writing?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 20, 2005 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
ONCE upon a time, when children knew nothing about publishing dates and the most famous wizard was Merlin, writer-director Steve Kloves was asked if he had any interest in adapting a children's book that was very popular in the United Kingdom. He was torn -- he had just finished adapting the dark literary comedy "Wonder Boys," which had been fun.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 2001 | SEAN MITCHELL, Sean Mitchell is a regular contributor to Calendar
Surely it must be easier, one could assume, to make a movie from an existing book or play than to have to come up with an original story, but talk to filmmakers who've done both and you will hear otherwise.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 5, 1993 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Flesh and Bone" proves what "The Fabulous Baker Boys" postulated, that writer-director Steve Kloves is a bred-in-the-bone filmmaker. Up to a point. For though this finely made movie displays remarkable virtues, including the most moving performance of Dennis Quaid's career, it is also good money sent after bad, a series of impressive accomplishments recruited to serve a questionable plot.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2003 | A Times staff writer
Mike Newell has signed on to direct "Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire," Warner Bros. confirmed Sunday. Newell is the first British director assigned to one of the "Potter" films. "Goblet" will be the fourth of what has become a phenomenally popular series based on the books by British author J.K. Rowling. Steve Kloves will adapt the novel for the screen, as he did the previous three. He recently completed the Julia Roberts movie "Mona Lisa Smile," which will open later this year.
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