Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSteve Lacy
IN THE NEWS

Steve Lacy

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1987 | DON HECKMAN
For most jazz horn players, the prospect of performing with only the accompaniment of a piano is a thought just slightly less disturbing than walking on stage in underwear. But Tuesday night at Catalina's Bar and Grill, soprano saxophonist Steve Lacy, neatly dressed in a business suit, displayed no apprehensions at all about working in a duo with pianist Mal Waldron.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2004 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Steve Lacy, a leading soprano saxophonist in the modern era of jazz and one of the few jazz musicians awarded a MacArthur Fellowship, the so-called "genius grant," has died. He was 69. Lacy died Friday of cancer at New England Baptist Hospital in Boston, according to a statement from the New England Conservatory of Music, where he taught.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
It was not what you might call an auspicious opening for Steve Lacy. Returning to Catalina Bar and Grill on Friday night for his second booking in less than a year, the Paris-based soprano saxophonist was immediately confronted by the late flight-caused absence of bassist Jean-Jacques Avinel and the unavoidable presence of a sound system that couldn't quite seem to deal with the delicate balances of the Lacy sextet's music. Still, the promise was there.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Soprano saxophonist Steve Lacy feels that the best jazz is made by the players most willing to take chances--masters, he says, of "brinkmanship." And it's a description that perfectly suits Lacy, as well, a player whose entire career--once past a youthful training period with New Orleans music--has taken place on the cutting edge of jazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 26, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Soprano saxophonist Steve Lacy feels that the best jazz is made by the players most willing to take chances--masters, he says, of "brinkmanship." And it's a description that perfectly suits Lacy, as well, a player whose entire career--once past a youthful training period with New Orleans music--has taken place on the cutting edge of jazz.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1989 | A. JAMES LISKA
Steve Lacy, the celebrated "first soprano saxophonist of modern jazz" whose quest for an appreciative audience gave rise to his emigration to Europe in 1970, opened a three-night stint at Catalina Bar & Grill on Tuesday night. Though the sextet features some extraordinary talents in pianist Bobby Few and bassist Jean-Jacques Avenel, there were few inspired moments during the three-tune, hourlong opening set. But there were plenty of moments of drudgery.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 8, 2004 | Jon Thurber, Times Staff Writer
Steve Lacy, a leading soprano saxophonist in the modern era of jazz and one of the few jazz musicians awarded a MacArthur Fellowship, the so-called "genius grant," has died. He was 69. Lacy died Friday of cancer at New England Baptist Hospital in Boston, according to a statement from the New England Conservatory of Music, where he taught.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1992 | DON SNOWDEN
** 1/2 Steve Lacy, "Live at Sweet Basil's," Novus/RCA. Lacy's tart, economical soprano sax lines and his blend of European and jazz improvisation are distinctive and usually challenging, but this live set is peculiarly muted. More restrained pieces like "The Bath" and "The Wane" fare best, but surprisingly no one in this veteran unit steps forward to take command. The music's good--it's just not as viscerally gripping as the Lacy sextet can be.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite his reputation as one of the jazz world's most determined improvisers, saxophonist Steve Lacy is a simple man at heart. The opening set of his trio's two-night run at the Jazz Bakery on Monday included nothing so complex or detailed that it couldn't be followed. In fact, Lacy's approach was so accessible and inviting that it was impossible not to fall under his spell.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1993
Performing solo leaves a jazz artist with nothing to fall back on should the imagination falter. In his first solo concert ever in California, soprano saxophonist Steve Lacy had no need for any kind of safety net during two 40-minute sets in front of enthusiastic crowds that packed System M in Long Beach on Monday. Lacy opened each set with a suite of Thelonious Monk compositions followed by several of his own pieces.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1997 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Despite his reputation as one of the jazz world's most determined improvisers, saxophonist Steve Lacy is a simple man at heart. The opening set of his trio's two-night run at the Jazz Bakery on Monday included nothing so complex or detailed that it couldn't be followed. In fact, Lacy's approach was so accessible and inviting that it was impossible not to fall under his spell.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 21, 1993
Performing solo leaves a jazz artist with nothing to fall back on should the imagination falter. In his first solo concert ever in California, soprano saxophonist Steve Lacy had no need for any kind of safety net during two 40-minute sets in front of enthusiastic crowds that packed System M in Long Beach on Monday. Lacy opened each set with a suite of Thelonious Monk compositions followed by several of his own pieces.
NEWS
June 16, 1992 | LARRY GORDON, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Two Stanford University professors and two UC scholars--including an evolutionary biologist who has been blind since childhood--are among this year's 33 winners of the MacArthur Foundation's eclectic and coveted "genius" awards, officials announced Monday.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 1992 | DON SNOWDEN
** 1/2 Steve Lacy, "Live at Sweet Basil's," Novus/RCA. Lacy's tart, economical soprano sax lines and his blend of European and jazz improvisation are distinctive and usually challenging, but this live set is peculiarly muted. More restrained pieces like "The Bath" and "The Wane" fare best, but surprisingly no one in this veteran unit steps forward to take command. The music's good--it's just not as viscerally gripping as the Lacy sextet can be.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 9, 1989 | A. JAMES LISKA
Steve Lacy, the celebrated "first soprano saxophonist of modern jazz" whose quest for an appreciative audience gave rise to his emigration to Europe in 1970, opened a three-night stint at Catalina Bar & Grill on Tuesday night. Though the sextet features some extraordinary talents in pianist Bobby Few and bassist Jean-Jacques Avenel, there were few inspired moments during the three-tune, hourlong opening set. But there were plenty of moments of drudgery.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1989 | ZAN STEWART
American expatriate soprano saxophonist Steve Lacy will make an unusual return stop Monday on the Western swing of his current U.S. tour when he performs for the inmates at the California Institute for Men at Chino. Hornman Lacy, who has been living in Paris for more than 20 years, will bring his sextet to the same prison at which he played a duo concert with pianist Mal Waldron last September.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN
"Any artist has to focus and search after a certain kind of simplicity and economy," said soprano saxophonist Steve Lacy. "There's a lot of music around, maybe even too much music. The tendency for us is to want to boil it down to the essence. "To me, there's a big difference between jazz and gymnastics. Playing a lot of notes is gymnastics or calisthenics or something, exhibition. Music's not about that really. It's about meaning."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1989 | ZAN STEWART
American expatriate soprano saxophonist Steve Lacy will make an unusual return stop Monday on the Western swing of his current U.S. tour when he performs for the inmates at the California Institute for Men at Chino. Hornman Lacy, who has been living in Paris for more than 20 years, will bring his sextet to the same prison at which he played a duo concert with pianist Mal Waldron last September.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 1988 | DON HECKMAN
It was not what you might call an auspicious opening for Steve Lacy. Returning to Catalina Bar and Grill on Friday night for his second booking in less than a year, the Paris-based soprano saxophonist was immediately confronted by the late flight-caused absence of bassist Jean-Jacques Avinel and the unavoidable presence of a sound system that couldn't quite seem to deal with the delicate balances of the Lacy sextet's music. Still, the promise was there.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 25, 1988 | DON SNOWDEN
"Any artist has to focus and search after a certain kind of simplicity and economy," said soprano saxophonist Steve Lacy. "There's a lot of music around, maybe even too much music. The tendency for us is to want to boil it down to the essence. "To me, there's a big difference between jazz and gymnastics. Playing a lot of notes is gymnastics or calisthenics or something, exhibition. Music's not about that really. It's about meaning."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|