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Steve Largent

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October 11, 1986 | RICHARD HOFFER, Times Staff Writer
Steve Largent has tolerated a certain Northwest mythology, namely that any fair-minded glacier would have to spot him 30 yards in a timed 40-yard dash. If he were any slower, the local thinking goes, he'd be flagged for loitering on every post pattern. Pigeons often roost in his blond locks, the press reports. How slow is he? He's so slow the Seahawks employ a man just to remove moss from his north side. Seriously, folks, I wanna tell you . . .
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SPORTS
October 18, 2000 | Times Wire Services
NFL all-time reception leaders: 1. x-Jerry Rice, San Francisco: 1,239 2. x-Cris Carter, Minnesota: 962 3. x-Andre Reed, Washington: 946 4. Art Monk: 940 5. x-Irving Fryar, Washington: 827 6. Steve Largent: 819 7. Henry Ellard: 812 8. x-Tim Brown, Oakland: 801 9. James Lofton: 764 10. Michael Irvin: 750 Charlie Joiner: 750 12. x-Andre Rison, Oakland: 719 13. Gary Clark: 699 14. Ozzie Newsome: 662 15. Charley Taylor: 649 16. x-Herman Moore, Detroit: 638 17. Drew Hill: 634 18.
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SPORTS
October 28, 1989 | BOB WOLF
It's the Triple Crown of career pass receiving, and a most unlikely candidate is on the verge of winning it. Ring Lardner, a legendary New York sportswriter with a remarkable flair for humor, had a pet line that would have been a perfect fit for Steve Largent: "Although he was small, he was also slow." Largent is so small and so slow that 116 players were picked ahead of him in the National Football League's 1976 draft.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 31, 1997 | NANCY HILL-HOLTZMAN JIM BORNEMEIER and HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
No need to worry about Rep. James Rogan (R-Glendale) being a little fish in the big pond of Washington. Cable and online news service MSNBC has already decreed that Rogan has the potential to go so far he may swim up Pennsylvania Avenue into the Oval Office someday. Rogan was named to MSNBC's top 10 list of political stars in the next century, a distinction he shares with six children of prominent political fathers and an ex-wide receiver for the Seattle Seahawks--Rep. Steve Largent (R-Okla.).
SPORTS
October 18, 2000 | Times Wire Services
NFL all-time reception leaders: 1. x-Jerry Rice, San Francisco: 1,239 2. x-Cris Carter, Minnesota: 962 3. x-Andre Reed, Washington: 946 4. Art Monk: 940 5. x-Irving Fryar, Washington: 827 6. Steve Largent: 819 7. Henry Ellard: 812 8. x-Tim Brown, Oakland: 801 9. James Lofton: 764 10. Michael Irvin: 750 Charlie Joiner: 750 12. x-Andre Rison, Oakland: 719 13. Gary Clark: 699 14. Ozzie Newsome: 662 15. Charley Taylor: 649 16. x-Herman Moore, Detroit: 638 17. Drew Hill: 634 18.
SPORTS
December 28, 1987 | Associated Press
Seattle's Steve Largent became the National Football League's all-time reception leader Sunday in the Seahawks' 41-20 loss to Kansas City. Largent had 6 catches to increase his career total to 752, which surpasses the 750 by the San Diego Chargers' Charlie Joiner. Largent, a 12-year veteran from Tulsa, also extended his NFL record for consecutive games with a reception to 152. He entered the game needing 5 catches, 201 yards and 6 receiving touchdowns for career records in all three categories.
SPORTS
February 19, 1995 | MAL FLORENCE
Bob Smizik of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette acknowledges that Lynn Swann was an outstanding receiver for the Steelers. Nonetheless, he writes that Swann doesn't deserve to be in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. "Much of the uproar (in Pittsburgh) was based on the fact Steve Largent, also a wide receiver, was voted into the Hall of Fame over Swann.
SPORTS
April 30, 1989 | BOB OATES, Times Staff Writer
On an early-spring day in the California desert, an all-time all-pro named Don Hutson, 76, is playing gin rummy in the locker room of the Thunderbird Country Club, much as he has for 30 years. He used to be more active. A half-century ago when employed by the Green Bay Packers, Hutson invented pass receiving. Or so it seemed. He was the first of the National Football League's great receivers. What's more, time has stood still for Hutson in two respects. Incredibly, 45 years after retiring, he still holds 11 National Football League records.
SPORTS
December 19, 1985 | JIM MURRAY
Usually on the first day of training camp, pro football teams put a stopwatch on their wide receivers to see if they've lost any speed over the winter. The Seattle Seahawks never bother to time Steve Largent to find out. He hasn't got any speed to lose. Largent could catch a pass in a wheelchair. He could play the game just as well in hip boots. You look at Largent's NFL record and you picture a guy who has won two or more Olympic medals, who was either a high hurdler or a 400 relay man.
SPORTS
October 19, 1987 | Associated Press
If regular National Football League players couldn't stop Steve Largent in 142 games, non-union NFL players weren't going to stop him in one. Largent, back with Seattle after crossing the picket line earlier in the week, caught 15 passes for 261 yards and 3 touchdowns in a little more than a half Sunday and the Seahawks beat the Detroit Lions, 37-14, in the last game for most of the non-union players.
SPORTS
February 19, 1995 | MAL FLORENCE
Bob Smizik of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette acknowledges that Lynn Swann was an outstanding receiver for the Steelers. Nonetheless, he writes that Swann doesn't deserve to be in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. "Much of the uproar (in Pittsburgh) was based on the fact Steve Largent, also a wide receiver, was voted into the Hall of Fame over Swann.
SPORTS
December 24, 1989 | VITO STELLINO, THE BALTIMORE SUN
Steve Largent credits his success to following one of Earl Weaver's old bromides. Largent noted that Weaver, the former manager of the Baltimore Orioles, said, "The important thing is what you learn after you think you know it all. I never felt like I knew it all. I always kept working hard to learn more about the position I play." Largent, as usual, is underrating himself.
SPORTS
December 24, 1989 | From Associated Press
Among Steve Largent's receiving records is most touchdowns. In his NFL finale, it was one record he couldn't add on to. Largent, 35, caught two passes for 41 yards Saturday to extend his consecutive-game reception record to 177, but the Washington Redskins, behind the passing of Mark Rypien and the running of Earnest Byner, beat the Seahawks, 29-0. "It was an emotional time for me," said Largent, who completed his 14-year NFL career. "But I'm pretty disgusted with the way we played."
SPORTS
December 22, 1989 | From Associated Press
The conventional wisdom on Steve Largent in 1976 was that he was too small and too slow to make it in the NFL. This weekend he retires after 14 seasons with the Seattle Seahawks and after proving he was simply too much for even the best defenders in football. He will take with him every meaningful receiving record and leave behind a legacy of lessons in hard work and dedication to the sport that even opponents admire.
SPORTS
December 16, 1989 | CHRIS BAKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Having already scaled the heights of the NFL, wide receiver Steve Largent of the Seattle Seahawks decided one day to climb Mt. Rainier, the highest point in Washington at 14,410 feet. After a one-day class in mountain climbing, Largent and Jim Zorn, then the Seahawks' quarterback, began their ascent. After reaching the halfway point, they rested from 4 p.m. until midnight, when they began the final stage of the climb. Largent and Zorn reached the summit in the morning, capping the 14-hour climb.
SPORTS
December 11, 1989 | JOHN CLAYTON, MC CLATCHY NEWS SERVICE
Pete Gross, the Seattle Seahawks play-by-play announcer, collects sports souvenirs. No one in the Northwest can match Gross for his collection of old Pacific Coast League programs. His library of sports books fills more boxes than his family can believe, and it is only natural for Gross to shop for more when he makes Seahawks road trips. To his surprise, Gross collected the "Big One" Sunday afternoon.
SPORTS
December 11, 1989 | JOHN CLAYTON, MC CLATCHY NEWS SERVICE
Pete Gross, the Seattle Seahawks play-by-play announcer, collects sports souvenirs. No one in the Northwest can match Gross for his collection of old Pacific Coast League programs. His library of sports books fills more boxes than his family can believe, and it is only natural for Gross to shop for more when he makes Seahawks road trips. To his surprise, Gross collected the "Big One" Sunday afternoon.
SPORTS
December 14, 1988 | Mike Downey
This could be it for Steve Largent--his last game. This could be it for one of the smartest, shiftiest, craftiest, nicest, finest, most underestimated people ever to slip into football apparel, a guy who supplies living proof that you do not have to be half-man, half-monster to survive in today's National Football League. Twelve years ago, the Houston Oilers let Largent slip through their fingers, and footballs have been falling through Houston fingers ever since.
SPORTS
October 31, 1989 | BOB WOLF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's the triple crown of pass receiving, and a most unlikely candidate is on the verge of winning it. Ring Lardner, a legendary New York sportswriter with a remarkable flair for humor, had a pet line that would have been a perfect fit for Steve Largent: "Although he was small, he was also slow." Largent is so small and so slow that 116 players were picked ahead of him in the National Football League's 1976 draft.
SPORTS
October 28, 1989 | BOB WOLF
It's the Triple Crown of career pass receiving, and a most unlikely candidate is on the verge of winning it. Ring Lardner, a legendary New York sportswriter with a remarkable flair for humor, had a pet line that would have been a perfect fit for Steve Largent: "Although he was small, he was also slow." Largent is so small and so slow that 116 players were picked ahead of him in the National Football League's 1976 draft.
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