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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Susan King
Steve Lawrence loved to talk music with Frank Sinatra. During one of their chats, the Chairman of the Board asked Lawrence to name his favorite song. "I said, there are a lot of wonderful songs out there," Lawrence, 78, recalled in a recent interview. "He said, 'Name one.' I said OK, 'Moonlight in Vermont.' He said 'Why?' I said well to be honest it's the only American popular song I can think of that doesn't have a rhyme. " Sinatra was taken aback. "He said, 'Really? I recorded that song.' And he starts to sing it to me across the table.
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NEWS
March 25, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
A collection of jewelry once owned by the late Eydie Gorme that is headed to the auction block in New York City next month will be previewed locally -- for one day only -- this Sunday. The March 30 preview at Sotheby's Los Angeles marks the public unveiling of the auction-bound lot, which is  set to go under the gavel in New York on April 29. If you know anything about Gorme -- beyond the fact that she was a singer -- it's probably that she was half of the vocal duo Steve & Eydie.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2013 | By Claire Noland
Eydie Gorme, a pop vocalist who entertained nightclub audiences and TV viewers as a solo artist and with her husband, Steve Lawrence, died Saturday. She was 84. Gorme died at a Las Vegas hospital of an undisclosed illness, said her publicist, Howard Bragman. Since the mid-1950s, first as a soloist and then as part of the Steve and Eydie duo, Gorme sang pop hits, standards and show tunes while decked out in sequins and engaging in playful stage patter. Her first album with Lawrence, "We Got Us," won a Grammy Award in 1960.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By Susan King
Steve Lawrence loved to talk music with Frank Sinatra. During one of their chats, the Chairman of the Board asked Lawrence to name his favorite song. "I said, there are a lot of wonderful songs out there," Lawrence, 78, recalled in a recent interview. "He said, 'Name one.' I said OK, 'Moonlight in Vermont.' He said 'Why?' I said well to be honest it's the only American popular song I can think of that doesn't have a rhyme. " Sinatra was taken aback. "He said, 'Really? I recorded that song.' And he starts to sing it to me across the table.
SPORTS
August 26, 2006
There is another famous story about Wilt Chamberlain [Bill Dwyre's column, Aug. 22] complaining to veteran referee Mendy Rudolph that he'd been fouled but it wasn't called. Rudolph purportedly said: "Wilt, you want me to embarrass you and put you on the line?" STEVE LAWRENCE West Los Angeles
NEWS
March 25, 2014 | By Adam Tschorn
A collection of jewelry once owned by the late Eydie Gorme that is headed to the auction block in New York City next month will be previewed locally -- for one day only -- this Sunday. The March 30 preview at Sotheby's Los Angeles marks the public unveiling of the auction-bound lot, which is  set to go under the gavel in New York on April 29. If you know anything about Gorme -- beyond the fact that she was a singer -- it's probably that she was half of the vocal duo Steve & Eydie.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2013 | By Chris Barton
Eydie Gorme, the popular nightclub vocalist and half of the longtime musical partnership Steve & Eydie, died in a Las Vegas hospital Saturday after an undisclosed illness. She was 84 years old. Together with her husband, Steve Lawrence, Gorme was known for a breezy, easy listening style that merged well with the adult contemporary pop sound of the time. As a solo performer, she performed the Grammy-nominated 1963 hit "Blame It on the Bossa Nova," which was written by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil (listen below)
SPORTS
November 10, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Safety Steve Lawrence intercepted a pass to set up one touchdown and returned a fumble 79 yards to set up another Saturday as Notre Dame defeated Mississippi, 37-14. Lawrence returned his interception 27 yards in the second quarter, and the Irish marched the final 48 yards before Allen Pinkett scored on a one-yard run.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1996 | Robert Strauss, Robert Strauss is an occasional contributor to Calendar
The last heppest cat and his tigress are back onstage at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts, a sort of semitropical blond-wood La Scala, with pastel sport coats and stretch pants substituting for formal wear and gowns. He is carrying a Dewar's on the rocks, cradled close to his body, looking to the sky and saying, "Here's to our greatest ally, Scotland." She holds a Ketel One vodka and water elegantly at arm's length. He wears a tuxedo as comfortably as a robe and pajamas.
NEWS
February 6, 1986
The 23-year-old son of entertainers Eydie Gorme and Steve Lawrence has died of an apparent heart attack. Michael Lawrence died at UCLA Medical Center, coroner's spokesman Bob Dambacher said. An autopsy was planned.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 10, 2013 | By Chris Barton
Eydie Gorme, the popular nightclub vocalist and half of the longtime musical partnership Steve & Eydie, died in a Las Vegas hospital Saturday after an undisclosed illness. She was 84 years old. Together with her husband, Steve Lawrence, Gorme was known for a breezy, easy listening style that merged well with the adult contemporary pop sound of the time. As a solo performer, she performed the Grammy-nominated 1963 hit "Blame It on the Bossa Nova," which was written by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil (listen below)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 10, 2013 | By Claire Noland
Eydie Gorme, a pop vocalist who entertained nightclub audiences and TV viewers as a solo artist and with her husband, Steve Lawrence, died Saturday. She was 84. Gorme died at a Las Vegas hospital of an undisclosed illness, said her publicist, Howard Bragman. Since the mid-1950s, first as a soloist and then as part of the Steve and Eydie duo, Gorme sang pop hits, standards and show tunes while decked out in sequins and engaging in playful stage patter. Her first album with Lawrence, "We Got Us," won a Grammy Award in 1960.
SPORTS
August 26, 2006
There is another famous story about Wilt Chamberlain [Bill Dwyre's column, Aug. 22] complaining to veteran referee Mendy Rudolph that he'd been fouled but it wasn't called. Rudolph purportedly said: "Wilt, you want me to embarrass you and put you on the line?" STEVE LAWRENCE West Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1996 | Robert Strauss, Robert Strauss is an occasional contributor to Calendar
The last heppest cat and his tigress are back onstage at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts, a sort of semitropical blond-wood La Scala, with pastel sport coats and stretch pants substituting for formal wear and gowns. He is carrying a Dewar's on the rocks, cradled close to his body, looking to the sky and saying, "Here's to our greatest ally, Scotland." She holds a Ketel One vodka and water elegantly at arm's length. He wears a tuxedo as comfortably as a robe and pajamas.
SPORTS
November 10, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Safety Steve Lawrence intercepted a pass to set up one touchdown and returned a fumble 79 yards to set up another Saturday as Notre Dame defeated Mississippi, 37-14. Lawrence returned his interception 27 yards in the second quarter, and the Irish marched the final 48 yards before Allen Pinkett scored on a one-yard run.
NEWS
December 29, 1985
"Foul-Ups, Bleeps and Blunders" with Don Rickles and Steve Lawrence was 99% better than the dragged-out hour of "TV's Bloopers and Practical Jokes." Most of the hour is wasted on unfunny skits, and practical jokes never were funny. Bring back Rickles and Lawrence and put Ed and Dick to rest or on Saturday mornings for the children. M. Ceschke, Pomona
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 1989 | ALEENE MacMINN, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Several charities will benefit from an all-star benefit gala that Bob Hope will headline June 20 at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington. Joe Gibbs Charities, headed by Washington Redskins Coach Joe Gibbs, is the organizer of the event which will benefit, among other groups, Hope for a Drug-Free America and Youth for Tomorrow, a home for troubled and homeless boys, founded and chaired by Gibbs. Scheduled to appear with Hope are Cliff Robertson, Steve Lawrence and Edie Gorme, Crystal Gale, Burt Reynolds, Neil Sedaka, Pia Zadora, Brooke Shields, Rich Little, Sandi Patti, Bernadette Peters and Jon Schneider.
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