Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsSteve Levy
IN THE NEWS

Steve Levy

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1999 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the late 1980s, Steve and Jon Levy were pioneering rave outlaws. The British siblings were the guys who lugged speakers into downtown Los Angeles warehouses, collected cash from wild-eyed patrons and watched the door, hoping the cops wouldn't burst in and shut the whole affair down. "It was exhausting," Steve Levy says of those halcyon days when the all-night dance parties were a mysterious and illegal new import. "Crazy and exhausting."
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
December 11, 1999 | GEOFF BOUCHER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the late 1980s, Steve and Jon Levy were pioneering rave outlaws. The British siblings were the guys who lugged speakers into downtown Los Angeles warehouses, collected cash from wild-eyed patrons and watched the door, hoping the cops wouldn't burst in and shut the whole affair down. "It was exhausting," Steve Levy says of those halcyon days when the all-night dance parties were a mysterious and illegal new import. "Crazy and exhausting."
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 2011 | By Evan Halper and Anthony York, Los Angeles Times
The cash pouring into state coffers may seem like good news for Gov. Jerry Brown, who this week announced a surprise $6.6-billion surge. But the joke in the Capitol is that he might have served the public better by burying the windfall in the backyard. Propelled by the higher wages and investment incomes of the rich, the new money could actually stymie meaningful change in California's broken budget system, experts say, leaving state books unbalanced indefinitely. "It's going to relieve some of the pressure, which is exactly what Jerry Brown did not want," said Christopher Thornberg, a principal at Beacon Economics in Los Angeles.
BUSINESS
July 21, 2013 | By Marc Lifsher
SACRAMENTO - Professional athletes from out-of-state teams soon could be out of luck if they seek money through the workers' compensation system for injuries suffered at California sporting venues. A bill to scale back the lucrative benefits that California has awarded the athletes in recent years is moving swiftly through the Legislature and is likely to be on Gov. Jerry Brown's desk next month. Supporters said they expect Brown to sign it into law. Backed by football, baseball, basketball, hockey and soccer team owners, the legislation would close what they call a loophole that allows athletes, who sometimes played only a few games in California, to win six-figure payouts for so-called cumulative trauma injuries.
SPORTS
October 18, 1996 | HELENE ELLIOTT and LISA DILLMAN
General Manager Sam McMaster said he believed justice was done Thursday when the NHL suspended Philadelphia Flyer winger Daniel Lacroix for two games for "a flagrant elbow" against King left wing Kevin Stevens on Tuesday. No penalty was called by referee Don Van Massenhoven, but the Kings sent a tape to NHL Senior Vice President Brian Burke for review. "We're pleased with the league's decision, that they reviewed it and saw the same thing we did. We feel it's fair and equitable," McMaster said.
SPORTS
July 27, 1995 | CHRIS BAKER
Dodger second baseman Delino DeShields, who has sat out six of the last seven games because of an injured left hip which has been ruled sound, had his knee examined by Dr. Ralph Gambardella and Dr. Steve Levy, a neurologist, Wednesday morning. DeShields, who had his left leg X-rayed, will undergo an MRI test today. "I'm looking for some help," DeShields said. "I'm looking for some answers. I guess we'll get those from the tests. Chad Fonville replaced DeShields Wednesday night against Atlanta.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1996 | JOSE CARDENAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two animal rights protesters who attached themselves with handcuffs and bicycle locks to a railing outside a Macy's were arrested Sunday. Joy Randall, 16, and Darcy McMullen, 19, were among a dozen people protesting the sale of fur clothing at the Sherman Oaks Fashion Square department store. Firefighters used a chain saw and other tools to cut them loose. Randall and McMullen were arrested for trespassing.
NEWS
November 3, 1995
Lou Levy, 84, music publisher associated with Bob Dylan, the Beatles and Henry Mancini. Levy's company, Leeds Music, published Dylan's first songbook, the Beatles' first American hit, "I Want to Hold Your Hand," and Mancini's early songs. The publisher also nurtured the careers of the Ames Brothers, Bobby Darin, Eddie Fisher, Connie Francis, Woody Herman and Steve Lawrence. Levy once managed the Andrews Sisters and was briefly married to the late Maxene Andrews.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2009 | Shane Goldmacher
Less than four months after California leaders stitched together a patchwork budget, a projected deficit of nearly $21 billion already looms over Sacramento, according to a report to be released today by the chief budget analyst. The new figure -- the nonpartisan analyst's first projection for the coming budget -- threatens to send Sacramento back into budgetary gridlock and force more across-the-board cuts in state programs. The grim forecast, described by people who were briefed on the report by Legislative Analyst Mac Taylor, comes courtesy of California's recession-wracked economy, unrealistic budgeting assumptions, spending cuts tied up in the courts and disappearing federal stimulus funds.
NEWS
January 17, 1985 | DAVID FERRELL, Times Staff Writer
Four persons arrested in April, 1984, on child-molestation charges that were later dismissed have filed lawsuits charging the City of Pico Rivera and the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department with false-imprisonment, civil-rights violations, defamation and the negligent infliction of emotional distress. Attorney Peter Gwosdof, representing the four, said the suits were filed last week in Los Angeles Superior Court seeking an unspecified amount of damages.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|