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Steve Miller

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Steve Miller, 62, an Associated Press bureau chief in Germany during the tumultuous years of the Cold War and the fall of the Berlin Wall, died Saturday in Athens, Ohio, of complications from cancer.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
January 3, 2010
Re: "He's surfing a green wave," How I Made It, Dec. 27: I was happy to read about my alma mater, UC San Diego, in your profile of Byron Washom, the school's director of strategic energy initiatives. However, Washom is missing "think globally, act locally." Commuting to a job 500 miles away does not match the green profile of riding your bike to work. Tom Brown Brentwood Bonuses hardly appropriate Re: "Millions for loan chiefs despite losses," Dec. 25: The chief executives of Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac put their agencies on the verge of disaster, and for that they are getting bonuses.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1988 | LEONARD FEATHER
The line between pop music and jazz is growing thinner. Recent examples are Barry Manilow's use of Gerry Mulligan, Stan Getz and Diane Schuur in his "Swing Street" LP, and the superb Getz solo on the title cut of Huey Lewis' current album "Small World." Most remarkable of all is the addition of Steve Miller to what might be called the Jazz Aid ranks.
BOOKS
October 9, 2005
Regarding the excerpt from "Darwin: The Indelible Stamp" (Book Review, Sept 18): As someone firmly on the side of evolution, it pains me to see the apologists for science acquitting themselves so poorly in the debate with creationists, often showing the sort of arrogant, closed-minded certainty they deplore in their opponents. Watson avers that evolution is not just theory but fact. Watson cites the laws of gravity and motion as parallels. For two centuries after Newton, scientists believed in these laws as fervently as they believe in evolution today -- until relativity proved them profoundly wrong.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1997 | STEVE HOCHMAN
The '90s have been very good to Steve Miller. The veteran rocker has seen several of his classic songs revived by such esteemed artists as k.d. lang (who has "The Joker" on her new album), while the Spin Doctors and other young bands adapted his easygoing blues-pop style. Most important, a surprisingly youthful legion of rabid fans has made Miller one of the decade's top touring acts. His concerts are the most overgrown frat-party blowouts this side of Jimmy Buffett's.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 1990 | DON HECKMAN
Steve Miller may not be mining much new territory these days, but there's still plenty of gold in his oldies. Roaring into the Universal Amphitheatre on Thursday with his sizzling eight-piece band, the veteran singer-guitarist brought vigor and, in some cases, new perspective, to a collection of tunes dating across four decades.
NEWS
August 5, 1993 | BUDDY SEIGAL
Although Steve Miller came out of the late '60s San Francisco music scene, his bold debut album was a far cry from the often primitive efforts of most of his Bay Area kinsmen. "Children of the Future" is an opulently layered sonic adventure boasting stellar musicianship, finely crafted compositions and (for its day) state-of-the-art production.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 1991 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Water buffalo have no sweat glands. This lone fact, often and inexplicably emphasized by my 10th-grade geography teacher, is one of the few things I remember from high school. It's a little sad: Here they load us up with Charlemagne, Shakespeare and Copernicus, and all that's recalled two decades later is that water buffalo don't need Dial. But then, Steve Miller apparently has no sweat glands either, and loads of people remember him.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 3, 1995 | JERRY CROWE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Miller's blues roots run deep. As the son of a music-loving pathologist whose house guests included Charles Mingus and Les Paul, he learned to play lead guitar from blues legend T-Bone Walker when he was 9. When he was 12, he formed his first blues band. Later, after dropping out of college, he played Chicago blues and, after moving to San Francisco, formed the Steve Miller Blues Band.
BUSINESS
June 1, 1990 | JAMES RISEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gerald Greenwald's decision to give up his role as heir apparent to Lee A. Iacocca, in favor of a less-certain future heading an effort to buy United Airlines' parent, left a void in Chrysler's top management that the auto company Thursday moved quickly to fill. On the day after Greenwald, the 54-year-old Chrysler vice chairman, resigned to take charge of a union-led, $4 billion-plus buyout effort, Chairman Iacocca announced that R. S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 2005 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Steve Miller, 62, an Associated Press bureau chief in Germany during the tumultuous years of the Cold War and the fall of the Berlin Wall, died Saturday in Athens, Ohio, of complications from cancer.
OPINION
April 13, 2005
With "Relativity Speaking, Einstein Was a Slacker" (Commentary, April 11), you do harm just to get a laugh. True, Einstein's later work didn't match his early achievements, his scientific judgment was not unerring, and he was not a saint. But he did not coast later in his career, and his promotion of socially responsible science was a significant contribution in itself. Science has a tough enough time these days. Please don't make it tougher by mocking it falsely like this. Steve Miller San Diego
OPINION
November 12, 2000
Re "David Brower, Crusader for the Environment, Dies at 88," Nov. 7: Thank you for your sensitive article on the life and passing of David Brower. Brower is an excellent example of the conundrum of the warrior--a terror to his foes and sometimes to his friends as well. Because we need such warriors on the battlefield, we must take care to accommodate them behind the lines. STEVE MILLER San Diego In the lengthy obituary of environmental giant Brower there was no mention of the motivation behind his last great act of principle, that of resigning from the Sierra Club board last May. He chastised the club's leadership for not taking a strong stance on U.S. population growth and immigration.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2000
Regarding "It's No Longer Just About Sex," Commentary, July 18: The changes in society Carl Pearlston describes have nothing to do with why "gender" is replacing "sex" on forms. The real reason is that the principal meaning of "sex" these days is "intercourse" rather than "difference between male and female." People who create forms use "gender" because it's safer, less likely to offend. STEVE MILLER San Diego
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 23, 1999
I am horrified and astonished that the LAPD released an audiotape of William Shatner's phone call to 911 when he discovered that his wife had drowned (Aug. 19). I am even more disgusted that several television stations broadcast that recording. What has happened to compassion, privacy and plain old good judgment? Are there no limits at all to what television stations will broadcast in the name of ratings? STEVE MILLER Encino
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1997 | STEVE HOCHMAN
The '90s have been very good to Steve Miller. The veteran rocker has seen several of his classic songs revived by such esteemed artists as k.d. lang (who has "The Joker" on her new album), while the Spin Doctors and other young bands adapted his easygoing blues-pop style. Most important, a surprisingly youthful legion of rabid fans has made Miller one of the decade's top touring acts. His concerts are the most overgrown frat-party blowouts this side of Jimmy Buffett's.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 7, 1992 | JIM WASHBURN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Times sure change," Steve Miller noted as he held up a Coral electric sitar for the audience to view at the Pacific Amphitheatre on Sunday night. He related that the '60s heirloom had been considered a dog when he picked it up years ago for $125, and now he sees places charging $2,000 for the twangy things. He could as well have been holding his own career up for inspection. In the late '60s, Miller's solid music was all but lost in the shuffle of other San Francisco-based bands.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1993 | JEFF BAENEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Offstage, Steve Miller drops all the masks of his rock star life: the Joker, Gangster of Love, Space Cowboy. He answers every question, except for the big one. What exactly is the "pompetus of love," the cryptic phrase that crops up both on his 1973 hit "The Joker" and on his new album? " Pompetus of love will be written on my tombstone. I'm sorry, I can't tell you," Miller says, mock-seriously. "Whatever you think it means is what it means." The Joker laughs.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 16, 1997
The summer of '97 looks a lot like '77 at our local concert venues. Calendar Weekend flashes back with Steve Miller, Anne Murray, K.C. (of the Sunshine Band) and Joe Walsh. * How a catchy ditty became the movie "George of the Jungle."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 1997 | BILL LOCEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
During his lengthy career, Steve Miller has been through a schizophrenic's short list of musical personas, from "Gangster of Love" to "Joker" to "Space Cowboy." But through it all, he remains a hit maker. With a vast repertoire collected during 30 years in the business, Miller will open the 1997 season at the tree-lined Santa Barbara County Bowl, a venue that opened 60 years ago.
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