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NEWS
March 13, 1988 | Associated Press
Steve Mills, one of the last of the great vaudeville comedians who worked with the Shubert organization in the 1930s and 1940s, has died. He was 92. Mills, who last appeared on stage in 1977 in the show "This Was Burlesque," died Wednesday at his home in this suburb south of Providence. He had been mostly confined to his home since suffering a stroke in 1977. Mills began his career at 14 when he played amateur night with Fred Allen and Benny Rubin in his hometown of Boston.
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SPORTS
March 14, 2014 | By Ben Bolch
Seeking a return to prominence after decades of futility, the New York Knicks brought back a part of their past glory Friday when they officially agreed to hire Phil Jackson as team president, according to multiple reports. The Knicks have scheduled a news conference for 8 a.m. PDT Tuesday at Madison Square Garden for what they have termed a "major announcement. " ESPN reported that Jackson's contract was expected to pay him $12 million a year. Jackson, 68, will be making his first foray into the front office of an NBA team after winning 11 titles as a coach with the Lakers and Chicago Bulls.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2000
Re "Vegas Set to Up the Ante on Extravagance," Aug. 9: A casino that looks like the Titanic? That ought to make the gamblers feel real lucky! STEVE MILLS Glendale
OPINION
December 27, 2012
Re “ Let there be dark ,” Opinion, Dec. 21 A year ago I had the privilege of being one of the first scientists to see the nighttime satellite images of Earth that Paul Bogard refers to. Viewing the lights from East Asia, which represent a quarter of the planet's population, I was deeply moved. What stood out was the darkness of North Korea. Scientists who study these images have found a strong correlation between darkness and poverty. Although I applaud efforts to reduce artificial light pollution, we should not forget the benefits of electric lighting.
OPINION
April 2, 2002
Re "Catholics Take Comfort in Easter," April 1: With all the scandal surrounding the Roman Catholic Church, I expected that disillusioned Catholics would stay away from Easter Sunday Mass. Instead, on Easter morning I found our church literally packed to the rafters. Friends and family reported the same phenomenon at their parishes. It seems to prove what we've really known all along--our faith is not in fallible priests or their fallible hierarchy. Our faith is in Jesus Christ, who rises above all scandal and sin. Steve Mills Glendale
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 1986 | J ohn M. Wilson
Hard to believe CBS has gotten TV fare out of William Caunitz's raunchy novel "One Police Plaza," a police procedural about a tough detective (Robert Conrad) investigating a particularly grisly murder that leads him into all kinds of violence and sordidness. But it's now in post-production for a January airing, according to Steve Mills, veep in charge of movies/miniseries.
OPINION
May 18, 2006
Re "Vatican Officials Grappling With 'Da Vinci Code,' " May 17 The article states " ... that Jesus married Mary Magdalene and had a child, an idea that challenges the divinity of Christ." This completely misrepresents Christian theology, which not only teaches that Christ is divine but that he is fully human, so his marital and parental status are not an issue. Because neither any canonical nor any other apocryphal writings mention a wife or child of Jesus, it has always been presumed that he was unmarried.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 2, 1998
I wasn't terribly surprised to find that among the 12 images of great architecture on your July 19 cover there was not one image of a building in Los Angeles ("Pillars of the 20th Century," by Nicolai Ouroussoff). The city and its planners have never truly valued architectural history here. But to find not one letter from the public in the following week's Calendar did surprise me. Clearly the public doesn't care either. Perhaps that's why we have so many mini-malls. CRAIG L. BYRD Los Angeles The depiction of Boris Iofan's design for the Palace of the Soviets reminded me of another architectural behemoth.
SPORTS
April 6, 1987
San Diego State scored four runs in the bottom of the eighth inning to defeat Hawaii, 4-3, and earn a split of a Western Athletic Conference doubleheader Sunday on Smith Field. Hawaii (3-1, 21-16) won the first game, 4-3. In the second game, Hawaii took a 3-0 lead in the seventh inning. But in the eighth, SDSU's Anthony Johnson singled in one run, Lance Pinnell drove in another with a fielder's choice and Bob Parry's single tied the score. Chuck McInnis' single made it 4-3.
OPINION
February 17, 2004
Re "Defiant San Francisco Marries Dozens of Same-Sex Couples," Feb. 13: How immensely moving and appropriate that Phyllis Lyon and Del Martin, two of my heroes, had the honor of being the first same-sex couple to marry in San Francisco. Unfortunately, I believe that Mayor Gavin Newsom's move, while noble, is not legal. But look at these two women, who for 51 years have shown that they are indeed "spouses for life," as married as anyone could be. No just government would deny them the right to be married in law, as they clearly are in fact.
OPINION
May 13, 2007
Re "Gov. may gamble on privatized lottery," May 10 It seems that Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger has become a fiscal "girly man." Rather than doing the heavy lifting needed to eliminate the budget deficit by negotiating some combination of spending decreases and tax increases, he proposes the shortsighted, easy fix of privatizing the lottery. Private companies undoubtedly could do a better job of running the lottery than the state. Why not hire them to do so under an arrangement that would allow the state to receive a portion of the incremental profits the private companies generate while retaining ownership of the lottery?
OPINION
May 18, 2006
Re "Vatican Officials Grappling With 'Da Vinci Code,' " May 17 The article states " ... that Jesus married Mary Magdalene and had a child, an idea that challenges the divinity of Christ." This completely misrepresents Christian theology, which not only teaches that Christ is divine but that he is fully human, so his marital and parental status are not an issue. Because neither any canonical nor any other apocryphal writings mention a wife or child of Jesus, it has always been presumed that he was unmarried.
OPINION
February 17, 2004
Re "Defiant San Francisco Marries Dozens of Same-Sex Couples," Feb. 13: How immensely moving and appropriate that Phyllis Lyon and Del Martin, two of my heroes, had the honor of being the first same-sex couple to marry in San Francisco. Unfortunately, I believe that Mayor Gavin Newsom's move, while noble, is not legal. But look at these two women, who for 51 years have shown that they are indeed "spouses for life," as married as anyone could be. No just government would deny them the right to be married in law, as they clearly are in fact.
OPINION
September 9, 2003
As an aerospace scientist who regularly deals with data from space instruments, I found "PR With Universal Appeal" (Sept. 5) to be very misleading. It states that images produced by the Hubble Space Telescope are altered. To say an image is altered, however, presumes that some true image actually exists. The purpose of the Hubble is to produce scientific data, not true-to-life photographs. It is not like a normal camera that reproduces what we see by measuring the three primary colors that the eye is sensitive to. The Hubble can detect a much larger multitude of spectral bands than those three primaries.
OPINION
April 2, 2002
Re "Catholics Take Comfort in Easter," April 1: With all the scandal surrounding the Roman Catholic Church, I expected that disillusioned Catholics would stay away from Easter Sunday Mass. Instead, on Easter morning I found our church literally packed to the rafters. Friends and family reported the same phenomenon at their parishes. It seems to prove what we've really known all along--our faith is not in fallible priests or their fallible hierarchy. Our faith is in Jesus Christ, who rises above all scandal and sin. Steve Mills Glendale
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 2001
"Rap Was Eminem's Roots and Road Out of Poverty" (Feb. 21) is your third major feature story in recent weeks either about the controversial nature of Eminem's lyrics or on account of them. Yet like the previous two, this piece fails to quote any of the purportedly offensive lyrics. The Times apparently is so afraid of words that it has decided to cover what it represents as a significant cultural debate without giving its readers the basic tools to participate or to judge for themselves.
OPINION
September 9, 2003
As an aerospace scientist who regularly deals with data from space instruments, I found "PR With Universal Appeal" (Sept. 5) to be very misleading. It states that images produced by the Hubble Space Telescope are altered. To say an image is altered, however, presumes that some true image actually exists. The purpose of the Hubble is to produce scientific data, not true-to-life photographs. It is not like a normal camera that reproduces what we see by measuring the three primary colors that the eye is sensitive to. The Hubble can detect a much larger multitude of spectral bands than those three primaries.
MAGAZINE
May 17, 1998
Thank you for Bill Dwyre's interview with John Wooden ("At the Feet of the Master," March 29). The sports world once had many heroic figures like Wooden, people with a more high-minded purpose than "show me the money." Some may pity Wooden because he didn't retire a wealthy man, but he clearly has more riches than many of today's sports figures are ever likely to see. Steve Mills Glendale It's encouraging to read about someone who is living a life based on such sound principles.
NEWS
December 4, 2000
Regarding your article on the Mirman School ("Where Bright Minds Can Shine," Nov. 20), I have no objections to such institutions that educate mentally gifted children. However, I read nothing describing the moral education of these students. Principal Barry Ziff says, "Average people don't change the world." This may be true, but highly intelligent individuals have done great harm to the world when they have used their gifts selfishly. With exceptional ability comes exceptional responsibility.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2000
Re "Vegas Set to Up the Ante on Extravagance," Aug. 9: A casino that looks like the Titanic? That ought to make the gamblers feel real lucky! STEVE MILLS Glendale
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