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BUSINESS
November 22, 1993 | CHRIS WOODYARD
Succeeding in business can be a little like learning to ride a motorbike. You ride, you fall, you ride again. Eventually, you get the hang of it. So says Steve Nelson, who has spent years in the saddle of his own customized motorcycle and developing a $3-million business selling aftermarket parts for Harley-Davidsons. Nelson, a high school dropout from Chicago's South Side, said he became a millionaire by age 26.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
November 11, 2006
Re "It's only a movie," editorial, Nov. 4 Despite the millions of dollars injected into the local economy (including, it should be said, my salary as first-unit production sound mixer on "Live Free or Die Hard"), because of the potential inconvenience of intermittent road closures on one of the many routes to Los Angeles International Airport, The Times claims the city would be better off had this major motion picture been filmed in Canada. This is a slap in the faces of the hundreds of people whose livelihoods would be directly affected by such a loss.
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SPORTS
November 27, 1986
Steve Nelson, New England Patriot linebacker, will miss the rest of the NFL's regular season and playoffs after undergoing knee surgery in Boston.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The improvising duet may be the most primal form of jazz interaction. Regardless of the combination -- and there is a seemingly infinite variety of possibilities (from two pianos to two guitars, from saxophone and bass to trumpet and drums) -- the duet's potential for intimate, mano-a-mano musical exchanges is jazz in its most pristine creative state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1989
Five people were stabbed after a fight broke out among suspected gang members at a party in Acton, authorities said. Salvador Balle, 25, of Canyon Country; Rubin Magana, 26, of Saugus; Raymond Moreno, 25, and Louis Ruiz, 18, both of Los Angeles, were taken to area hospitals and were in stable condition, Sgt. Steve Nelson of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said. The name of the fifth victim was not immediately available. The stabbings occurred Saturday night when a fight broke out in the driveway of a home where members of two gangs were having a party, Nelson said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1988
In one of the largest civil judgments in the memory of officials at the Vista Superior Courthouse, a jury has awarded more than $1.6 million to Assistant U.S. Atty. Steve Nelson and his wife in their civil lawsuit claiming they were maliciously prosecuted by an investment partner who for a time was Nelson's colleague. The same jury was to resume deliberations today in Vista Superior Court Judge Don Martinson's courtroom to assess possible punitive damages in the case.
SPORTS
December 28, 1993 | TIM KAWAKAMI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirteen months after his professional debut, Oscar De La Hoya and his estranged co-managers are expected to officially end their business relationship by the middle of this week. In exchange for a cash settlement, Bob Mittleman and Steve Nelson have agreed in principle to terminate their five-year, $1-million contract with the fighter and drop a $10-million lawsuit they had filed against two of De La Hoya's new advisers.
OPINION
November 11, 2006
Re "It's only a movie," editorial, Nov. 4 Despite the millions of dollars injected into the local economy (including, it should be said, my salary as first-unit production sound mixer on "Live Free or Die Hard"), because of the potential inconvenience of intermittent road closures on one of the many routes to Los Angeles International Airport, The Times claims the city would be better off had this major motion picture been filmed in Canada. This is a slap in the faces of the hundreds of people whose livelihoods would be directly affected by such a loss.
SPORTS
December 8, 1993 | TIM KAWAKAMI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere, in a hospital room nearby, Joe De La Hoya's son was having his left hand examined, but he did not know where it was taking place or exactly when his son might return home. Oscar De La Hoya's father just stood in front of the new Montebello house he shares with his sons, shrugged his shoulders and told anyone who asked that he was sorry, but he had no answers. "I can't say anything," Joe De La Hoya said Tuesday afternoon as the confusion over his son's legal wranglings continued.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 29, 2004 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
The improvising duet may be the most primal form of jazz interaction. Regardless of the combination -- and there is a seemingly infinite variety of possibilities (from two pianos to two guitars, from saxophone and bass to trumpet and drums) -- the duet's potential for intimate, mano-a-mano musical exchanges is jazz in its most pristine creative state.
SPORTS
December 28, 1993 | TIM KAWAKAMI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirteen months after his professional debut, Oscar De La Hoya and his estranged co-managers are expected to officially end their business relationship by the middle of this week. In exchange for a cash settlement, Bob Mittleman and Steve Nelson have agreed in principle to terminate their five-year, $1-million contract with the fighter and drop a $10-million lawsuit they had filed against two of De La Hoya's new advisers.
SPORTS
December 8, 1993 | TIM KAWAKAMI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Somewhere, in a hospital room nearby, Joe De La Hoya's son was having his left hand examined, but he did not know where it was taking place or exactly when his son might return home. Oscar De La Hoya's father just stood in front of the new Montebello house he shares with his sons, shrugged his shoulders and told anyone who asked that he was sorry, but he had no answers. "I can't say anything," Joe De La Hoya said Tuesday afternoon as the confusion over his son's legal wranglings continued.
BUSINESS
November 22, 1993 | CHRIS WOODYARD
Succeeding in business can be a little like learning to ride a motorbike. You ride, you fall, you ride again. Eventually, you get the hang of it. So says Steve Nelson, who has spent years in the saddle of his own customized motorcycle and developing a $3-million business selling aftermarket parts for Harley-Davidsons. Nelson, a high school dropout from Chicago's South Side, said he became a millionaire by age 26.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 19, 1989
Five people were stabbed after a fight broke out among suspected gang members at a party in Acton, authorities said. Salvador Balle, 25, of Canyon Country; Rubin Magana, 26, of Saugus; Raymond Moreno, 25, and Louis Ruiz, 18, both of Los Angeles, were taken to area hospitals and were in stable condition, Sgt. Steve Nelson of the Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said. The name of the fifth victim was not immediately available. The stabbings occurred Saturday night when a fight broke out in the driveway of a home where members of two gangs were having a party, Nelson said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 1988
In one of the largest civil judgments in the memory of officials at the Vista Superior Courthouse, a jury has awarded more than $1.6 million to Assistant U.S. Atty. Steve Nelson and his wife in their civil lawsuit claiming they were maliciously prosecuted by an investment partner who for a time was Nelson's colleague. The same jury was to resume deliberations today in Vista Superior Court Judge Don Martinson's courtroom to assess possible punitive damages in the case.
SPORTS
November 27, 1986
Steve Nelson, New England Patriot linebacker, will miss the rest of the NFL's regular season and playoffs after undergoing knee surgery in Boston.
NEWS
July 7, 1998 | From a Times Staff Writer
Roy Rogers, the "King of the Cowboys" who sang, smiled and occasionally shot his way into the hearts of multitudes of Little Buckaroos, died Monday. He was 86. Rogers died of congestive heart failure in his Apple Valley home near Victorville, with his wife and co-star Dale Evans and other family members at his side. He had undergone heart surgery in 1977 and 1990 and had been somewhat frail in recent years.
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