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Steve Nordeck

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1992
Recently you ran an article about Steve Nordeck losing his county Planning Commission seat due to redrawing of district lines ("Remap to Cost Planner Nordeck His Post," Dec. 10). In the article, you gave deserved mention of his accomplishments while holding that position, most notably the Foothill/Trabuco Specific Plan, which was going nowhere until he was given the job of wrapping it up. But then you had to drag out that tired, embarrassing and groundless old story about the political dinner held in his restaurant, which created a hollow flap at the time.
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HOME & GARDEN
April 14, 2012 | Chris Erskine
I'm on my way down to lower Orange County in our old minivan, the Honey Fitz. It's bleeding power steering fluid, but other than that the Honey Fitz is charging out of the barn, three of the four cylinders firing in sequence, the other a virtual wooden leg. I'd planned to bring my wife, Posh, but when I left the house, she was all tied up with some project. Actually, she was lying on the bedroom floor, ensnared in the strings of a Pinocchio toy she was trying to put away a little too quickly.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1994 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Nordeck calls homespun San Juan Capistrano "my remedy for Manhattan Beach." Nordeck, a former mayor of that upscale Los Angeles County beach town, moved to Orange County 10 years ago to escape the frenetic L.A. lifestyle. "I came down here to ride horses. If I want it, the beach is only five minutes away," said Nordeck, 52, a Coto de Caza resident who served four years on the Orange County Planning Commission. "I plan on being here a long time."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1994 | LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Steve Nordeck calls homespun San Juan Capistrano "my remedy for Manhattan Beach." Nordeck, a former mayor of that upscale Los Angeles County beach town, moved to Orange County 10 years ago to escape the frenetic L.A. lifestyle. "I came down here to ride horses. If I want it, the beach is only five minutes away," said Nordeck, 52, a Coto de Caza resident who served four years on the Orange County Planning Commission. "I plan on being here a long time."
HOME & GARDEN
April 14, 2012 | Chris Erskine
I'm on my way down to lower Orange County in our old minivan, the Honey Fitz. It's bleeding power steering fluid, but other than that the Honey Fitz is charging out of the barn, three of the four cylinders firing in sequence, the other a virtual wooden leg. I'd planned to bring my wife, Posh, but when I left the house, she was all tied up with some project. Actually, she was lying on the bedroom floor, ensnared in the strings of a Pinocchio toy she was trying to put away a little too quickly.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 25, 1996 | JULIE FATE SULLIVAN
Owners of the Mission Promenade and the Moonrose have been honored by the City Council with the 1996 Community Pride Awards. Owned by developers Steve Nordeck and Richard J. O'Neill, the Mission Promenade won for outstanding building design. The shopping mall at Ortega Highway and Camino Capistrano was converted from Depression-era buildings, including the town's first City Hall, newspaper office and post office.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 20, 1989
Steve Nordeck, a former mayor of Manhattan Beach who owns the Trabuco Oaks Steak House in Trabuco Canyon, was nominated to the County Planning Commission Thursday by Supervisor Gaddi H. Vasquez. "Steve Nordeck comes to the position with significant experience in land-use matters and familiarity with the public policy," Vasquez said in a statement. "A former mayor, councilman and school board president, he is skilled in receiving public input and reviewing technical data."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 18, 1994 | ANDREW LePAGE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The sale of an entire city block in the heart of downtown San Juan Capistrano for $1.1 million to a development partnership will be considered next Tuesday by the City Council. The property, across the street from Mission San Juan Capistrano, includes three decades-old buildings that make up El Peon Plaza. The buyer is San Juan Partners, which consists of Richard J. O'Neill, a local rancher and one of the county's wealthiest men, and Steve Nordeck, who owns the Swallows Inn.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1994 | JEFF BEAN
City Council candidate Wyatt Hart has raised more than twice as much money as any other challenger in the Nov. 8 council race. Nine candidates are running for three seats. Hart, a retired Sheriff's Department captain who is on the city's Planning Commission, had raised $8,888 for the year as of Sept. 30, according to campaign disclosure statements. He had spent $4,261. Among contributors to Hart's campaign are several local business owners and outgoing City Councilman Gary L. Hausdorfer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 1, 1994 | JEFF BEAN
The owners of four businesses that must be moved from historic downtown buildings have filed a claim against the city seeking a minimum of $1 million. Tenants of the mostly vacant El Peon complex say they should be compensated for losing their location because of the city's recent sale of the property to investors who plan to renovate the structures.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1992
Recently you ran an article about Steve Nordeck losing his county Planning Commission seat due to redrawing of district lines ("Remap to Cost Planner Nordeck His Post," Dec. 10). In the article, you gave deserved mention of his accomplishments while holding that position, most notably the Foothill/Trabuco Specific Plan, which was going nowhere until he was given the job of wrapping it up. But then you had to drag out that tired, embarrassing and groundless old story about the political dinner held in his restaurant, which created a hollow flap at the time.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1994 | JEFF BEAN
Businessmen to Fight Eviction Owners of at least two of four businesses left in downtown's El Peon Plaza say they plan to fight eviction, and one contends that the city's sale of the property earlier this year, along with the way he has been treated, bode financial ruin for him. "I'm losing everything," said Musa Sharaf, who runs Cynthia's Tea Room & Bakery. "I always paid rent on time. The city should be trying to help small businesses, not put them out on the street."
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