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Steve Nunno

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SPORTS
July 15, 1992 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a gym about five miles north of Grandy's restaurant--where you can get all the livers and gizzards you can eat for $2.99--Shannon Miller is practicing. Her hair frizzed, her face sweaty, she steps to a door in a building the size of a bus depot and tries to catch a breeze. It's 90 degrees outside, 95 inside and the humidity is off the scale. It's nearly 8 o'clock on what for most others is a lazy summer night in June.
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SPORTS
April 11, 1993 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new world order in gymnastics has arrived and it is propelled by twin engines: the breakup of the former Soviet Union--the sport's old world order--and the ascension last August of a mite from Edmond, Okla., Shannon Miller. The political splintering of the once-powerful Eastern Bloc has not diminished the number of elite female gymnasts in the world, but it has left them standing under different flags.
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SPORTS
April 11, 1993 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The new world order in gymnastics has arrived and it is propelled by twin engines: the breakup of the former Soviet Union--the sport's old world order--and the ascension last August of a mite from Edmond, Okla., Shannon Miller. The political splintering of the once-powerful Eastern Bloc has not diminished the number of elite female gymnasts in the world, but it has left them standing under different flags.
SPORTS
July 15, 1992 | MARYANN HUDSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a gym about five miles north of Grandy's restaurant--where you can get all the livers and gizzards you can eat for $2.99--Shannon Miller is practicing. Her hair frizzed, her face sweaty, she steps to a door in a building the size of a bus depot and tries to catch a breeze. It's 90 degrees outside, 95 inside and the humidity is off the scale. It's nearly 8 o'clock on what for most others is a lazy summer night in June.
SPORTS
April 21, 1994 | From Associated Press
Shannon Miller, defending world champion in the all-around, rebounded from a disappointing opening day during Wednesday's World Gymnastics Championships. Miller, 17, from Edmond, Okla., qualified second behind teammate Dominique Dawes in the beam event and third behind Romania's Lavinia Milosovici and Dawes in the floor exercises. It was an improvement after Tuesday, when she was fourth in qualifying for the vault and missed out on a place in the final of the uneven bars. Steve Nunno, U.S.
SPORTS
April 19, 1993 | From Staff and Wire Reports
American Shannon Miller and Vitali Scherbo of Belarus were confirmed as the world's best gymnasts Sunday when they wound up with three titles each at the World Championships at Birmingham, England. Scherbo, who won six gold medals at the Barcelona Olympics, added the vault and parallel bars titles to the all-round championship he won on Thursday. Miller, a 16-year-old high school student from Edmond, Okla., floundered on the beam, one of her strongest events, and finished last.
SPORTS
July 10, 1992 | MARYANN HUDSON
Betty Okino, 17, of Houston and Michelle Campi, 15, of Carmichael, Calif., fought back from recent injuries and earned two of seven berths on the U.S Olympic women's gymnastics team that was announced Thursday night. The squad was named by a vote of the coaches of the participating gymnasts after a two-day training camp in Tampa, Fla. The six-member team and alternate will be decided before the team arrives in Barcelona.
SPORTS
August 3, 1992 | BILL GLAUBER, Baltimore Sun
And on the eighth day, Shannon Miller did not train. She rested . . . and savored the five Olympic gymnastics medals she earned through a week of pressure-packed competition. Miller showed up at the gymnastics hall Sunday carrying her two silvers and three bronzes. She did a brief interview with the TripleCast crew. She watched the men complete their individual apparatus finals. She signed autographs.
NEWS
July 25, 1996 | MIKE PENNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
So, what place in history belongs to the new Olympic women's gymnastics team champions? "This team is very close to the all-time U.S. gymnastics team," says Steve Nunno, personal coach for Shannon Miller. "If you were to put together every U.S. star that ever was, the only two kids you'd be missing would be Kim Zmeskal and Mary Lou Retton." Nunno laughed. "I think they'd be our two alternates," he quipped.
SPORTS
March 20, 1995 | RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Biting his lip to keep from breaking into tears, Steve Nunno, who coaches Shannon Miller, walked away from reporters to regain his composure before the final night of gymnastics competition Thursday in the Pan American Games, before returning to answer questions about the death of another U.S. gymnastics coach, Mark (Stormy) Eaton. Eaton, 45, was killed Wednesday in a small plane crash near Winslow, Ariz. Nunno said that he would not tell the U.S.
SPORTS
August 21, 2000 | DIANE PUCIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When you watch the women's gymnastics competition at the 2000 Olympics, there will be a surprise. Actual women. Women with curves, with hips and breasts. Women taller than 5 feet and heavier than a piece of cotton. Women who are stronger but not as flexible, women who can vault higher but might not be able to do so many back somersaults on the balance beam. After the 1996 Olympics, the International Federation of Gymnastics (FIG) instituted age requirements.
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