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Steve Oedekerk

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1995 | Robert W. Welkos, Robert W. Welkos is a Times staff writer
Jim Carrey was stuffing asparagus spears in his mouth for a scene in the wacky Warner Bros. comedy "Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls" when director Steve Oedekerk called for another take. When filming resumed, Carrey packed his jaws with more asparagus. The director called for more takes. Carrey shoved in more asparagus. "It finally got to the point where he was incapable of speaking," Oedekerk recalled. "I couldn't even call out, 'Cut!' He was beet-red, dying of laughter.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
EXCLUSIVE: Could the massive success of “Ted” - with $120 million in box office after two weekends, it's outpacing R-rated juggernauts “Bridesmaids” and “The Hangover” - prompt a run on comedies about a man and his whimsical childhood pals? Steve Oedekerk hopes so. The veteran comedy writer behind movies like “Bruce Almighty” and “The Nutty Professor” has penned a script titled “Escape From Dabble Drive” that plays on a similar theme as “Ted.” He and his representatives are aiming to set up the human-furball hybrid at a studio that will release the movie as early as the 2013 holidays, with Oedekerk also directing the picture.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1997 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a town where people will do anything to get their script noticed--even cajoling therapists they know to pass along a screenplay to one of their studio executive patients--Steve Oedekerk not only gets paid for writing movies but also gets to direct his own work too. But what the writer-director of "Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls" and of this summer's "Nothing to Lose," starring Tim Robbins and Martin Lawrence, really wants to do--or at least do, too--is be the star himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 1, 1997 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a town where people will do anything to get their script noticed--even cajoling therapists they know to pass along a screenplay to one of their studio executive patients--Steve Oedekerk not only gets paid for writing movies but also gets to direct his own work too. But what the writer-director of "Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls" and of this summer's "Nothing to Lose," starring Tim Robbins and Martin Lawrence, really wants to do--or at least do, too--is be the star himself.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Nothing to Lose" is Exhibit A in what's right and what's wrong with current Hollywood comedy. There's no lack of wickedly funny people to place in films, but once they're cast, no one seems to know exactly what to do with them. Written and directed by Steve Oedekerk, who's written for both Jim Carrey and Eddie Murphy, "Nothing to Lose" stars Martin Lawrence and Tim Robbins as a pair of opposites-attract guys thrown together by the whim of capricious fate.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 9, 2012 | By Steven Zeitchik
EXCLUSIVE: Could the massive success of “Ted” - with $120 million in box office after two weekends, it's outpacing R-rated juggernauts “Bridesmaids” and “The Hangover” - prompt a run on comedies about a man and his whimsical childhood pals? Steve Oedekerk hopes so. The veteran comedy writer behind movies like “Bruce Almighty” and “The Nutty Professor” has penned a script titled “Escape From Dabble Drive” that plays on a similar theme as “Ted.” He and his representatives are aiming to set up the human-furball hybrid at a studio that will release the movie as early as the 2013 holidays, with Oedekerk also directing the picture.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 8, 2004
Movie deal: Kevin James, the star of the sitcom "The King of Queens," will voice the principal character of Otis the cow in "The Barnyard," a computer-generated film from writer-producer Steve Oedekerk for Nick Movies. * Miniseries: NBC is planning a 12-hour miniseries called "Berry Gordy's Motown," about how he built the company that produced such acts as the Jackson 5, the Supremes and the Temptations.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 18, 1996 | BETH KLEID, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Tim Robbins, who's up for a best director Oscar for "Dead Man Walking," will tackle some lighter fare. Robbins will star with Martin Lawrence in Touchstone Pictures' comedy, "Nothing to Lose," to be directed by Steve Oedekerk ("Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls"). Robbins will play an ad executive who kidnaps a carjacker (Lawrence) trying to rob him. Production is set to begin next month.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2001 | GENE SEYMOUR, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius" has so many bright colors and whirring parts that you wish it were either on your Christmas tree or beneath it. Whether you want something this shiny and shrink-wrapped on a movie screen is a whole other issue and, as is customary with such things, may depend on how old you are. Digitally animated in the manner of 1950s puppet shows (Anyone out there old enough to remember "Rootie Kazootie"?), "Jimmy Neutron: Boy Genius" is a spawn of the Nickelodeon cable network.
BUSINESS
January 9, 1996
Entertainment industry lawyers David Colden and Joel McKuin are leaving the Beverly Hills firm of Weissmann, Wolff, Bergman, Coleman & Silverman to form their own firm representing film and TV talent. The new firm will be called Colden & McKuin and is expected to open in the next few weeks in Beverly Hills.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 18, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"Nothing to Lose" is Exhibit A in what's right and what's wrong with current Hollywood comedy. There's no lack of wickedly funny people to place in films, but once they're cast, no one seems to know exactly what to do with them. Written and directed by Steve Oedekerk, who's written for both Jim Carrey and Eddie Murphy, "Nothing to Lose" stars Martin Lawrence and Tim Robbins as a pair of opposites-attract guys thrown together by the whim of capricious fate.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 1995 | Robert W. Welkos, Robert W. Welkos is a Times staff writer
Jim Carrey was stuffing asparagus spears in his mouth for a scene in the wacky Warner Bros. comedy "Ace Ventura: When Nature Calls" when director Steve Oedekerk called for another take. When filming resumed, Carrey packed his jaws with more asparagus. The director called for more takes. Carrey shoved in more asparagus. "It finally got to the point where he was incapable of speaking," Oedekerk recalled. "I couldn't even call out, 'Cut!' He was beet-red, dying of laughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 28, 2002 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In 1966 Woody Allen launched his filmmaking career by taking a cut-rate, straight-faced 1964 Japanese James Bond knockoff called "Key of Keys," erased the sound and music tracks, replacing it with his own uproarious dialogue and got the Lovin' Spoonful to compose a groovy score. When American International Pictures released it as "What's Up, Tiger Lily?," Allen was on his way.
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