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Steve Pezman

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ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1998 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here's the pitch: a half-hour TV series that examines the history, personalities and milestones of surfing--mini-documentaries on surf filmmakers, say, or on the world's greatest surf breaks. Surfer's Journal Publisher Steve Pezman knows how the big kahunas at the major television networks would greet such an idea: Later, dude. "TV programming executives look at surfing as being akin to wrist-wrestling," Pezman said from the quarterly's San Clemente office.
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BUSINESS
February 2, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard
The gig: Steve Pezman and his wife, Debbee, quit key roles at Surfer magazine in 1992 to try to create a National Geographic for wave-riding grown-ups. As other surf pubs focus on big-bucks competitions and apparel ads, the Surfer's Journal still runs long stories and lavish photo spreads celebrating surf history, lore and lifestyle. Published six times annually, sold in surf shops for $15.95 a pop and to subscribers for $63 a year, the magazine runs just six ads in each 128-page edition.
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NEWS
January 3, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bellied up to the breakfast bar in Chuck Ehlers' mobile home, Steve Pezman thumbed through a pile of old black and white photographs showing Ehlers and his buddies riding the waves off Manhattan Beach in the '20s and '30s. At 76, Ehlers is one of the surviving members of the pioneer surfing fraternity that rode heavy redwood boards four decades before the Beach Boys set the legendary California surfing lifestyle to music.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1998 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here's the pitch: a half-hour TV series that examines the history, personalities and milestones of surfing--mini-documentaries on surf filmmakers, say, or on the world's greatest surf breaks. Surfer's Journal Publisher Steve Pezman knows how the big kahunas at the major television networks would greet such an idea: Later, dude. "TV programming executives look at surfing as being akin to wrist-wrestling," Pezman said from the quarterly's San Clemente office.
BUSINESS
February 2, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard
The gig: Steve Pezman and his wife, Debbee, quit key roles at Surfer magazine in 1992 to try to create a National Geographic for wave-riding grown-ups. As other surf pubs focus on big-bucks competitions and apparel ads, the Surfer's Journal still runs long stories and lavish photo spreads celebrating surf history, lore and lifestyle. Published six times annually, sold in surf shops for $15.95 a pop and to subscribers for $63 a year, the magazine runs just six ads in each 128-page edition.
NEWS
October 25, 2005
Regarding "Lecture From on High" [Oct. 11]: The story dismissed the vital importance of Yvon Chouinard's message in its fervor to find flaws. Far from "hypocritical," Chouinard would be the first to tell you his business process is not 100% green. His attempt to cajole businesspeople to follow suit rather than unabatedly continue to contribute to our ultimate ruin is the focus of the memoir. Business as a construct of mankind must have ethics to survive. We must work desperately to achieve that sophisticated state or perish.
NEWS
May 18, 1986
The state Park and Recreation Commission has unanimously authorized a plan to generate more money at Malibu Pier by adding a second restaurant and fast-food stand in existing structures there, and negotiating a 20-year master lease for the entire pier. The pier operator would have to upgrade the shabby, decaying structure immediately and pay the state 5% of yearly revenues for rent. A restaurant and sportfishing business are already in place at the pier; both leases will expire by 1987.
SPORTS
June 14, 1988
Lewis Earl (Hoppy) Swarts, a 1930s surfing champion who helped organize the sport in California, died of a stroke while on his way to a contest in Northern California. He was 71. Swarts was in line at a Los Angeles International Airport ticket counter when he collapsed and died of a massive stroke Thursday, a longtime friend, Dave McIntyre, said Monday. Swarts' body will be cremated and the ashes scattered at 8 a.m. Sunday at Redondo Beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1988 | LAURA KURTZMAN
At one time or another in the 1950s and '60s, nearly every great California surfer rode the waves at San Onofre. Phil Edwards, considered the best surfer in the world during the 1950s and early '60s, spent his teen-age summers inventing surfing maneuvers at San Onofre, along with Mickey Dora. Dora later became famous for his fancy surfing at Malibu.
OPINION
July 29, 2009
Re "Long Beach's barrier riff," July 24 As a surfer who began in Alamitos Bay in the late 1950s, I applaud the effort to reestablish waves in Long Beach. Before the breakwater, the "flood control" at the outlet of the Los Angeles River was a go-to south swell surf break. Ever since the breakwater, Long Beach has been primarily a surfing backwater whose lore is all about the past. Communities with waves cope with the natural ocean and, in turn, receive the beauty and allure and economic boost.
NEWS
January 3, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bellied up to the breakfast bar in Chuck Ehlers' mobile home, Steve Pezman thumbed through a pile of old black and white photographs showing Ehlers and his buddies riding the waves off Manhattan Beach in the '20s and '30s. At 76, Ehlers is one of the surviving members of the pioneer surfing fraternity that rode heavy redwood boards four decades before the Beach Boys set the legendary California surfing lifestyle to music.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1991 | LESLIE BERKMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Some say it was fitting that Orral W. (Blackie) August died last week of a heart attack while camping at San Onofre, a surfing beach. He was 76. In his youth, August was a pioneer in the sport. Later he became a popular father figure and folk hero among Orange County surfers who for decades were frequent guests at the August family's oceanfront house in Seal Beach. "Most surfers knew (August) as a friend when you were in trouble," said Steve Pezman, publisher of Surfer Magazine.
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