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NEWS
August 17, 2006 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
WE'VE all been there. When rejected for something or other for one reason or another, it can suddenly seem as if the whole system, the world at large, has been designed for the single, soul-crushing purpose of stopping each of us dead in our tracks. In the new comedy "Accepted," young Bartelby Gaines (Justin Long) stares at such an emotional abyss after he is turned down by every college.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
The new rom-com remake "About Last Night" finds Michael Ealy and Joy Bryant following in the footsteps of Rob Lowe and Demi Moore, who in the 1986 adaptation of David Mamet's play "Sexual Perversity in Chicago" played a fetching young couple grappling with love and commitment in the big city. Meanwhile, their two best friends - Jim Belushi and Elizabeth Perkins then, Kevin Hart and Regina Hall now - alternately hook up and bicker. But while Lowe and Moore's lovebirds were the draw in the first outing, this time it's the comic relief of Hart and Hall leaving an impression on movie critics, many of whom say the film is pretty satisfying, if rather familiar.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
The new rom-com remake "About Last Night" finds Michael Ealy and Joy Bryant following in the footsteps of Rob Lowe and Demi Moore, who in the 1986 adaptation of David Mamet's play "Sexual Perversity in Chicago" played a fetching young couple grappling with love and commitment in the big city. Meanwhile, their two best friends - Jim Belushi and Elizabeth Perkins then, Kevin Hart and Regina Hall now - alternately hook up and bicker. But while Lowe and Moore's lovebirds were the draw in the first outing, this time it's the comic relief of Hart and Hall leaving an impression on movie critics, many of whom say the film is pretty satisfying, if rather familiar.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
The question to be asked of "About Last Night," the so-called reimagining of the 1986 screen adaptation of David Mamet's caustic one-act dating comedy "Sexual Perversity in Chicago," is not: "Is it better than the first film?" because it's a draw, at best. Rather, the question is: "Is there any pressing need for it?" There isn't. Nonetheless, the apparently marketable title is back - minus its original closing ellipsis - and the action has been moved from Chi-Town to Los Angeles with four appealing, talented African American actors in the lead roles originally played by Rob Lowe, Demi Moore, Jim Belushi and Elizabeth Perkins.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Gary Goldstein
The question to be asked of "About Last Night," the so-called reimagining of the 1986 screen adaptation of David Mamet's caustic one-act dating comedy "Sexual Perversity in Chicago," is not: "Is it better than the first film?" because it's a draw, at best. Rather, the question is: "Is there any pressing need for it?" There isn't. Nonetheless, the apparently marketable title is back - minus its original closing ellipsis - and the action has been moved from Chi-Town to Los Angeles with four appealing, talented African American actors in the lead roles originally played by Rob Lowe, Demi Moore, Jim Belushi and Elizabeth Perkins.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2000 | KATHLEEN CRAUGHWELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of the running jokes in the new Touchstone comedy "High Fidelity" is that the lead character (played by John Cusack) and his two slacker buddies make Top 5 lists of everything (best relationship breakups, best breakup songs, best post-breakup songs). So the party planners for the Tuesday night post-premiere party at the Sunset Room in Hollywood ran with the conceit and offered up Top 5 potato dishes (mashed was the most popular), meat dishes, vegetable dishes and so on.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 24, 1997 | F. KATHLEEN FOLEY
Italian playwright Dario Fo's recent Nobel Prize for literature seems strikingly ironic. Outrageously iconoclastic, Fo's commedia-influenced farces are pitched so far outside the mainstream they defy official encomiums. "Accidental Death of an Anarchist," Fo's early '70s satire, now at the Evidence Room, depicts the chaos that arises when one gloriously demented Fool (Gregory Sporleder), impersonating a muckraking judge, leads a bunch of corrupt cops on a series of merry tangents.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 11, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It's live ammunition that's coming at you in "Grosse Pointe Blank." A wild at heart, anarchic comedy that believes in living dangerously, it follows a hit man to his high school reunion and survives to tell the tale. John Cusack, vividly watchable as always, does more than star as morose assassin Martin Q. Blank; he has organized a kind of Cusack conglomerate of relatives and friends to bring this darkly playful project to fruition.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 8, 2001 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Embracing an eclectic mix ranging from fables to character-driven dramas and even a dog show comedy replete with quirky human pet owners, the Writers Guild of America on Wednesday nominated writers from 10 films for WGA screenwriting awards. Nominated for best original screenplay were Cameron Crowe for "Almost Famous"; Christopher Guest and Eugene Levy for "Best in Show"; Lee Hall for "Billy Elliot"; Susannah Grant for "Erin Brockovich"; and Kenneth Lonergan for "You Can Count on Me."
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1998 | BOB HEISLER, FOR THE TIMES
There's no bulletproof divider between the cab driver and his passengers in the episodic and uneven "Chicago Cab." The barrier is between the driver, whose name we never learn, and the audience. The double-shift worth of fares feel compelled to reach across the space between front seat and back, to use the driver as a sounding board, a counselor, an accomplice, a minister, a bank, a mirror and a pal. He is none of those things. That's the point.
NEWS
August 17, 2006 | Mark Olsen, Special to The Times
WE'VE all been there. When rejected for something or other for one reason or another, it can suddenly seem as if the whole system, the world at large, has been designed for the single, soul-crushing purpose of stopping each of us dead in our tracks. In the new comedy "Accepted," young Bartelby Gaines (Justin Long) stares at such an emotional abyss after he is turned down by every college.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 18, 2006 | Stephen Williams, Newsday
It's every high schooler's dream: going to a college with courses like Preparing the Perfect Slurpee, Motorcycles in the Swimming Pool, Slacking 101, 201, 301, 401. Majoring in tank tops or heavy metal. Teachers? Forget it. The sophomores teach the freshmen, or maybe the other way round. Better yet, no one teaches anyone. As for Poe, Newton, Einstein, O'Neill ... well, we can wee on them from a high place. Even David Mamet's not welcome.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 31, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
"What came first," Rob Gordon (John Cusack) desperately wants to know, "the music or the misery?" Over-stimulated by the sounds coming out of his outsize headphones, morose Rob is seizing the moment of his breakup with Laura (Iben Hjejle) to reflect on "the thousands of hours of heartache, rejection, pain, misery and loss" he experienced while exposing himself to wave after wave of popular music. "Did I listen because I was miserable," he wonders, "or was I miserable because I listened?"
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