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Steve Prefontaine

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SPORTS
May 6, 1985 | GERALD SCOTT, Times Staff Writer
Pre lives. Nowhere is the legacy of Steve Prefontaine more acute than in the Pacific Northwest, where in the early 1970s he captured the hearts and minds of his fellow citizens as readily as he did headlines and first-place finishes. In his native Coos Bay, they've built a memorial to him and named streets after him.
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March 2, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell and Steven Zeitchik
For his performance as the transgender AIDS patient Rayon in "Dallas Buyers Club," Jared Leto essentially became a different person for 25 days. He dropped more than 30 pounds, adopted a lilting accent and stayed in character for the entirety of the shoot, clacking around in high heels, short skirts and garish makeup. On Sunday, Leto won his first Oscar for the role, which marked the biggest transformation yet in a career marked by reinvention, and it also represented a return to roots for an actor who for several years was more likely to be found on stage with his rock band than in front of a camera.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Great athletes are of life and larger than it. Their personal dramas are acted out in public, their starkly outlined victories and defeats written in large, unmistakable letters. We watch their struggles with something like awe, envying, perhaps, an existence where questions of winning and losing are brutally clear-cut. Distance runner Steve Prefontaine was one of the premier American athletes of his age. Competing for the University of Oregon, he was the only man ever to hold the U.S.
SPORTS
July 3, 2010
Walter Dix spoiled Tyson Gay's return. Dix won the 200 meters in the Prefontaine Classic at Eugene, Ore., on Saturday in 19.72 seconds, edging Gay by 0.04 of a second. Gay had not competed since May because of a hamstring injury. The Prefontaine, which did not include a men's 100, was a first step toward challenging Jamaican Usain Bolt's dominance in the sprints. Bolt, the world-record holder in the 100 and 200, did not compete at Saturday's meet, part of the elite IAAF Diamond League series.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 11, 1996 | Kevin Baxter, Kevin Baxter is a Times staff writer
Take Exit 192 off Interstate 5 in western Oregon, turn west and you'll find yourself in Eugene, an idyllic college town full of wide boulevards, espresso bars and big houses with well-tended yards. But head east and you'll wind up in Springfield, a town of trailer parks, auto body shops and rundown apartment buildings. Steve Prefontaine spent thousands of hours running through the streets of both cities.
SPORTS
May 11, 1985
It was interesting reading Gerald Scott's article on Steve Prefontaine. I remembered Prefontaine as a superb runner and a great threat to get the United States a medal at the 1976 Olympics. His untimely death cut that idea short, but what I still remember is that in 1976 when the torch was carried into the Montreal stadium by two Canadians, one was named Prefontane--to remind us all of what could have been. OLAF OLSON Reseda
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1997 | JOE HENDERSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES: Joe Henderson is the West Coast editor and a columnist for Runner's World magazine
Steve Prefontaine's rebirth on film comes as twins this year as he lends his name and nickname to a pair of movies. "Prefontaine" from Disney's Hollywood Pictures is now playing, with "Pre" from Warner Bros. due out in the fall. All this for an athlete from the minor sport of distance running who never won an Olympic medal, which usually is a runner's only ticket to recognition in this country.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 1997 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Steve Prefontaine was, to crib a line from Bruce Springsteen, born to run. And to win. The ultimate competitive animal, he finished first in more than 75% of his races and remains the only person ever to hold the U.S. records in every distance from 2,000 to 10,000 meters. But there is another side to this charismatic runner, who knew he was good and wasn't fearful about sharing the knowledge.
SPORTS
May 30, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He would no doubt be delighted to know he's still selling tickets. Steve Prefontaine has now been dead as long as he lived, 24 years. When he ran his sports car off a two-lane road in Eugene, Ore., and died, America had lost perhaps its most charismatic track athlete ever. When he died, he held every American distance running record between 2,000 and 10,000 meters. He had a compelling, hard-charging running style and a fiercely competitive personality.
SPORTS
October 7, 1998 | MIKE PENNER
What: "Without Limits" Where: Southland theaters First to the finish may well be the golden rule of track, but it is not always the best policy when it comes to making movies about track. In the runoff of the dueling Steve Prefontaine biopics, "Prefontaine" beat "Without Limits" to the big screen by more than a year, stirring a brief buzz of enthusiasm that ultimately faded upon reflection, leaving behind the aftertaste of not-quite-fulfilled potential.
SPORTS
June 8, 2009 | KURT STREETER
Speaking with running legend Alberto Salazar late last week I noted that I was heading off to the Prefontaine Classic, the celebration of track and field held each year in Eugene, Ore. This, I told him, would be my first "Pre." "You're going to love it," Salazar replied. "It's condensed. Just a few hours of nonstop action. Incredible fans . . . If it's going to catch on in this country, this is the way track should be." It didn't take long on Sunday to see that Salazar was right, on all counts.
SPORTS
May 28, 2000 | LANDON HALL, ASSOCIATED PRESS
It is the place where his hero died, but Gabe Jennings finds comfort and inspiration there. Last summer, Jennings, an enormously talented runner at Stanford, went to the rock where Steve Prefontaine crashed his convertible on May 30, 1975. Although he had a race to run the next day, Jennings stayed there past sunset, when the winding, shadowy road felt even eerier. "It's a powerful place," Jennings said. "I feel the spirit. You feel like he's still alive."
SPORTS
May 30, 1999 | EARL GUSTKEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He would no doubt be delighted to know he's still selling tickets. Steve Prefontaine has now been dead as long as he lived, 24 years. When he ran his sports car off a two-lane road in Eugene, Ore., and died, America had lost perhaps its most charismatic track athlete ever. When he died, he held every American distance running record between 2,000 and 10,000 meters. He had a compelling, hard-charging running style and a fiercely competitive personality.
SPORTS
October 18, 1998 | LISA DILLMAN
Defenseman Mathieu Schneider, who was traded by the Toronto Maple Leafs to the New York Rangers on Wednesday, has always been something of a mystery man, confounding coaches and teammates. Jacques Demers, now the coach and general manager of the Tampa Bay Lightning, coached Schneider in Montreal and once said: "One day, I would like to open up a small hole in his brain, just to see what's going on in there. "Having said that, I like him."
SPORTS
October 7, 1998 | MIKE PENNER
What: "Without Limits" Where: Southland theaters First to the finish may well be the golden rule of track, but it is not always the best policy when it comes to making movies about track. In the runoff of the dueling Steve Prefontaine biopics, "Prefontaine" beat "Without Limits" to the big screen by more than a year, stirring a brief buzz of enthusiasm that ultimately faded upon reflection, leaving behind the aftertaste of not-quite-fulfilled potential.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1998 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
Great athletes are of life and larger than it. Their personal dramas are acted out in public, their starkly outlined victories and defeats written in large, unmistakable letters. We watch their struggles with something like awe, envying, perhaps, an existence where questions of winning and losing are brutally clear-cut. Distance runner Steve Prefontaine was one of the premier American athletes of his age. Competing for the University of Oregon, he was the only man ever to hold the U.S.
SPORTS
September 10, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY
The new Warner Bros. movie about Steve Prefontaine is called "Without Limits." As an alternative title, I like, "Better Than the Last Movie About Steve Prefontaine." For a more comprehensive review from a genuine critic about the movie that opens Friday, turn to that day's Calendar section. From a sportswriter's perspective, I was impressed with the movie's respect for details.
SPORTS
September 10, 1998 | RANDY HARVEY
The new Warner Bros. movie about Steve Prefontaine is called "Without Limits." As an alternative title, I like, "Better Than the Last Movie About Steve Prefontaine." For a more comprehensive review from a genuine critic about the movie that opens Friday, turn to that day's Calendar section. From a sportswriter's perspective, I was impressed with the movie's respect for details.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 31, 1997 | JOE HENDERSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES: Joe Henderson is the West Coast editor and a columnist for Runner's World magazine
Steve Prefontaine's rebirth on film comes as twins this year as he lends his name and nickname to a pair of movies. "Prefontaine" from Disney's Hollywood Pictures is now playing, with "Pre" from Warner Bros. due out in the fall. All this for an athlete from the minor sport of distance running who never won an Olympic medal, which usually is a runner's only ticket to recognition in this country.
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