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Steve Railsback

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NEWS
December 22, 1991
Valerie Bertinelli may have gotten top billing in the TV miniseries "In a Child's Name" (CBS, Nov. 17, 19), but Michael Ontkean stole the show as the deadly dentist Ken Taylor. He gave the most chilling performance since Steve Railsback's portrayal of Charles Manson in "Helter Skelter." Kenneth L. Zimmerman, Cypress
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2004 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
There have long been parts whose talismanic potency has shaped the lives of the actors who've inhabited them. Bela Lugosi was never bigger than as Dracula; Christopher Reeve was forever marked by his association with Superman, Man of Steel. Almost 30 years after he starred in the original 1976 miniseries "Helter Skelter," actor Steve Railsback wonders if playing mass murderer Charles Manson ruined his career.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1985 | RODERICK MANN
Steve Railsback is one actor for whom interesting things have long been forecast. It started with CBS' "Helter Skelter" in which he turned in a darkly compelling performance as Charles Manson. And it began again after his work in "The Stunt Man" with Peter O'Toole. "Steve cannot fail to do well," said O'Toole when that film was over. Richard Rush, who directed, agreed. But "Helter Skelter" was made in 1976 and "The Stunt Man" in 1980. What's happened since?
NEWS
December 22, 1991
Valerie Bertinelli may have gotten top billing in the TV miniseries "In a Child's Name" (CBS, Nov. 17, 19), but Michael Ontkean stole the show as the deadly dentist Ken Taylor. He gave the most chilling performance since Steve Railsback's portrayal of Charles Manson in "Helter Skelter." Kenneth L. Zimmerman, Cypress
ENTERTAINMENT
May 16, 2004 | Rachel Abramowitz, Times Staff Writer
There have long been parts whose talismanic potency has shaped the lives of the actors who've inhabited them. Bela Lugosi was never bigger than as Dracula; Christopher Reeve was forever marked by his association with Superman, Man of Steel. Almost 30 years after he starred in the original 1976 miniseries "Helter Skelter," actor Steve Railsback wonders if playing mass murderer Charles Manson ruined his career.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 5, 2003 | From a Times staff writer
"Helter Skelter," Vincent Bugliosi's book about the Manson family killings of the 1960s, is going to be made into a TV movie by CBS for a second time, the Hollywood Reporter says. The trade paper reported Monday that CBS has given its OK to a three-hour adaptation by John Gray that focuses on Charles Manson and how he persuaded his followers to commit the 1969 Tate-LaBianca murders of which they were convicted by prosecutor Bugliosi.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 1994
Having had the privilege of being directed by Richard Rush in "The Stunt Man," I find The Times' reporting about him to be, at best, unfathomable ("Who's Got the Right to 'Color' Final Cut?," April 23). The Richard Rush I know and worked with is a man of impeccable integrity, ferocious perfectionism and loyalty. How these traits can somehow be perceived as character flaws is beyond my comprehension. I applaud his "24-hours-a-day, 7-days-a-week" dedication to a film into which he has poured his blood, sweat and soul.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 22, 1991 | PETER RAINER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
If you're unlucky, or foolhardy, enough to find yourself in the Monica Theatre for a screening of "Scissors," you might while away the time noting how it botches just about every thriller cliche ever invented. Filmmakers sometimes say they can learn more from bad movies than from good ones. For aspiring thriller directors, "Scissors," written and directed by Frank De Felitta, could serve as a how-not-to textbook. (It's unrated; contains gratuitous nudity and mayhem.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 1, 1985 | RODERICK MANN
Steve Railsback is one actor for whom interesting things have long been forecast. It started with CBS' "Helter Skelter" in which he turned in a darkly compelling performance as Charles Manson. And it began again after his work in "The Stunt Man" with Peter O'Toole. "Steve cannot fail to do well," said O'Toole when that film was over. Richard Rush, who directed, agreed. But "Helter Skelter" was made in 1976 and "The Stunt Man" in 1980. What's happened since?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1989 | Nancy Mills \f7
When director Brian De Palma was in Thailand last summer making "Casualties of War," he picked up Elia Kazan's autobiography one evening and was surprised to read about a Kazan film he'd seen 17 years earlier and forgotten--"The Visitors." More surprising: The story of the Kazan movie was the sequel to the tale that Palma was then shooting. "Casualties," due out Aug. 18, is based on a 1969 New Yorker article and later a book by Daniel Lang, reporting on the rape and murder of a Vietnamese woman by a group of American servicemen, and their subsequent court-martial.
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