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Steve Ralbovsky

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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1989 | STEVE HOCHMAN
The notion of American musical heritage used to conjure images of old codgers in coveralls straight from the Appalachians, monitored by troops of earnest musical preservationists. Not to Steve Ralbovsky. The 31-year-old A&M Records senior vice president of artists & repertoire is intent on sharing his belief that American music is a rich and varied living process, more vital and current today than ever.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 12, 1989 | STEVE HOCHMAN
The notion of American musical heritage used to conjure images of old codgers in coveralls straight from the Appalachians, monitored by troops of earnest musical preservationists. Not to Steve Ralbovsky. The 31-year-old A&M Records senior vice president of artists & repertoire is intent on sharing his belief that American music is a rich and varied living process, more vital and current today than ever.
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ENTERTAINMENT
January 21, 2001 | STEVE HOCHMAN
It's from Iceland. Its music is mostly languid, ethereal, drawn-out soundscapes that have virtually no chance for mainstream radio airplay in the U.S. Its lyrics are half in Icelandic and half in Hopelandish, a language the group made up. The members do very little in the way of press and state on their Web site that they "do not intend to become superstars or millionaires." And yet the band Sigur Ros is among the most-coveted acts by U.S. record labels at this time.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2001 | STEVE HOCHMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"Last time we played here was at the Dragonfly, and it was empty," said the Strokes' singer Julian Casablancas last week, addressing the fans at an anything-but-empty Troubadour. As the New York band played its melodic rock with a confident swagger, guys in the audience jumped up and down and women jostled for a view of the young, slightly scruffy musicians.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2004 | Steve Hochman, Special to The Times
If you are a musician and you think you have something that will reshape the landscape of popular music, now's a good time to step forward. It's a wide-open field. That's the consensus in an informal survey of A&R executives -- the talent scouts charged with sniffing out the next big things and signing the potential breakthrough artists -- designed to get a bead on the state of rock in late 2004.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 27, 2003 | Dean Kuipers, Special to The Times
For the handsome, longhaired Followill brothers, growing up the sons of a traveling Pentecostal evangelist who worked the revival circuit between Tennessee and Oklahoma in the '80s was more than just hard on their social life. They lived a brand of Southern life that few Americans can imagine. They've experienced the country as outsiders, looking at the world from inside a Flannery O'Connor story.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 16, 1998 | Robert Hilburn, Robert Hilburn is The Times pop music critic
It's just past 9 p.m. at the Largo nightclub in the Fairfax area, and the audience is enthralled by the local debut of Irish singer-songwriter Sinead Lohan. In "No Mermaid," the title track from her just-released Interscope album, Lohan's soft, almost whispered vocal captures nicely the self-affirmation of someone who races after her grandest dreams. "I am no mermaid," she sings, employing the familiar stereotype of the helpless female. "I am no fisherman's slave . . .
ENTERTAINMENT
May 23, 1993 | RICHARD CROMELIN, Richard Cromelin writes about pop music for Calendar.
"We are liars. We are horrible liars," says Mickey Melchiondo, the more voluble member of the rock duo Ween. "We can make people believe we're brothers, that we're gay, that we don't play anything onstage--that it's totally lip-synced." "That we grew up harvesting corn and milking cows," adds his partner, Aaron Freeman, who's officially known as Gene Ween. This is not what you want to hear after spending an hour talking to a band.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2006 | Steve Hochman, Special to The Times
JULIAN CASABLANCAS is getting tired of people asking him where he's going. And he doesn't mean Madrid, his destination this day as he navigates the Milan airport, in the middle of a hectic European jaunt of press sessions and club shows to advance Tuesday's release of the Strokes' third album, "First Impressions of Earth." Rather, the singer-songwriter is frustrated with questions about his band's larger direction, its ambition and goals. Its mission.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 1993 | RICHARD CROMELIN, Richard Cromelin writes about pop music for Calendar
Does this sound familiar? The singer doesn't get any mainstream radio play, maybe because she's a little too close to a traditional form. But people respond to the honesty of her singing, and she gradually builds a loyal audience through a backbreaking tour schedule. Mixing her own songs with material by other writers and playing music that extends a "root" American style, she earns a reputation for taste and integrity and becomes a consistent record seller in the 200,000 range.
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