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April 3, 2011 | By Kevin Berger, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A few minutes before 9 a.m. Sept. 11, 2001, Steve Reich was awakened by a phone call from his son, Ezra, who lived in the family's apartment five blocks from the World Trade Center. The composer and his wife, Beryl Korot, a video artist, had been asleep in their rural home in Vermont. Reich clicked on the TV and saw the second plane crash into the South Tower. He and Korot were shot with panic. "Don't hang up," Reich instructed Ezra, who was 23 and lived with his wife, Davies, and their 1-year-old daughter, Orah.
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October 13, 2012 | By Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic
By definition, electronic dance music's focus is on the primal pleasures of the body. Its main thrust, so to speak, is to prompt physicality through rhythm. And then there's Ricardo Villalobos, one of the most innovative producers making beats today. His new album, “Dependent and Happy,” focuses as much on communion with the head as with the booty. Born in Chile, he and his family relocated to Germany, where he connected with Berlin's fertile minimalist techno movement. Since his first releases in the mid-'90s, Villalobos has crafted vast, long pieces whose repetition as much suggests modern composers like Steve Reich, La Monte Young and Philip Glass as they do beat music.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 1989 | J. H.
There were no premieres this time for minimalist master Steve Reich and Musicians, who visited Wadsworth Theatre Saturday evening. But the familiar program--three recent works prefaced by an excerpt from the 1971 "Drumming"--generated its own excitement and proved once again the wide expressive range of a style often regarded as purely mechanical. The easy standout on this occasion was "Electric Counterpoint," a rare and joyful exercise in almost lyric whimsy.
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November 10, 2011 | By August Brown, Los Angeles Times
The abiding problem with seeing electronic music live is that what you're hearing often has no relationship to what's happening onstage. Whether it's a DJ cross-fading or a dubstepper banging on a sampler pad, a guy behind a laptop could be doing almost anything — perhaps just hitting the spacebar. The German electronic dance trio Brandt Brauer Frick pulled the curtain back in the video for its well-received single "Bop. " Over its nine minutes, the experimental electronic group takes the stage on a cheeky fake-TV show, "Minimal Parade," and methodically shows you how it's done.
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December 10, 1986 | DANIEL CARIAGA, Times Music Writer
Attending a concert of music by Steve Reich seems to raise the same, eternal questions: What is the nature of art? How does one listen productively, not passively? At what point does polytonality become chaos? How much repetition can a body take? Now that Reich is 50--an eminence the American composer achieved Oct. 3--one might expect that some of the answers to some of these questions would start to emerge. But no.
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April 29, 1997 | JOSEF WOODARD
An unofficial Steve Reich primer took place at the Skirball Center Sunday, as part of its Spring Concert Series. Though short, it touched on the various aspects of Reich's aesthetics, fueled by West African and Indonesian influences, early music and the all-American groove imperative, as well as a strong experimentalist leaning.
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April 21, 2009 | Diane Haithman
Brooklyn playwright Lynn Nottage, 44, who boasts a long association with the Southland through her work with Costa Mesa's South Coast Repertory theater, won the Pulitzer Prize for drama Monday for "Ruined," set in conflict-torn Africa. The prize marks only the second time an African American woman has netted the Pulitzer for drama. The first was Suzan-Lori Parks, who won in 2002 for "Top Dog/Underdog." Other winners in arts and literature include minimalist composer Steve Reich in music for "Double Sextet"; Elizabeth Strout in fiction for her short story collection, "Olive Kitteridge," set in small-town Maine; Annette Gordon-Reed for history for "The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family"; Jon Meacham for biography for "American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House"; poet W.S. Merwin for his collection "The Shadow of Sirius"; and Douglas A. Blackmon in general nonfiction for his book "Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans From the Civil War to World War II."
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November 17, 1996 | Justin Davidson, Justin Davidson is classical music critic at Newsday
SoHo's children are middle-aged these days, and composer Steve Reich, a fixture on New York's rebellious downtown loft scene when he was a bearded youth, recently turned 60. It is a becoming age for such a serious artist, another stage in what, in his purely Minimalist days, he called "music as a gradual process."
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October 8, 2001 | MARK SWED, TIMES MUSIC CRITIC
In much of his music during the past two decades, Steve Reich, one of America's best and best-known composers, has concentrated on the state of America spiritually, politically and materially. Through the innovative use of prerecorded voices matched to musical lines played by a string quartet, "Different Trains" tells the story of his train trips across America as a young boy during World War II, paralleling the train trips of others in Nazi-controlled Europe who never returned.
NEWS
June 11, 2008
Ojai Music Festival: A review of the Ojai Music Festival in Tuesday's Calendar section misspelled the Steve Reich composition "Tehillim" as "Tehellim."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 3, 2011
The Kronos Quartet Where: Renée & Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall, Costa Mesa When: 8 p.m. Wednesday Tickets: $30 to $195 Information: (949) 553-2422 or http://www.philharmonicsociety.org
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April 3, 2011 | By Kevin Berger, Special to the Los Angeles Times
A few minutes before 9 a.m. Sept. 11, 2001, Steve Reich was awakened by a phone call from his son, Ezra, who lived in the family's apartment five blocks from the World Trade Center. The composer and his wife, Beryl Korot, a video artist, had been asleep in their rural home in Vermont. Reich clicked on the TV and saw the second plane crash into the South Tower. He and Korot were shot with panic. "Don't hang up," Reich instructed Ezra, who was 23 and lived with his wife, Davies, and their 1-year-old daughter, Orah.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 23, 2011 | By August Brown, Los Angeles Times
On an unseasonably searing day in West Hollywood last fall, Nika Danilova is hiding from the sun. To meet for an interview, the 21-year-old who records as Zola Jesus rounds a corner in comically enormous geriatric sunglasses that obscure her tiny, falconish face. With her tangle of dyed-platinum hair and weather-rebutting tight goth getup, she looks like she's en route back to the local Rest Home for Retired Metalheads. To passing strangers, she could be a UV-damaged celebrity on reconnaissance.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2010 | By Kevin Berger, Special to the Los Angeles Times
When David Lang discovered "Heroin" in high school he was petrified. At the time, the 1970s, Lang was a classical music nerd in Los Angeles. Then he slipped into the dark rock thrum of the mournful ode to the seductive drug, written and sung by Lou Reed. "I just remember being completely terrified," Lang said of the night he first put the needle down on the debut Velvet Underground album, which included "Heroin. " "It was danger and terror and drugs and sex. It was twisted and relentless.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 21, 2009 | Diane Haithman
Brooklyn playwright Lynn Nottage, 44, who boasts a long association with the Southland through her work with Costa Mesa's South Coast Repertory theater, won the Pulitzer Prize for drama Monday for "Ruined," set in conflict-torn Africa. The prize marks only the second time an African American woman has netted the Pulitzer for drama. The first was Suzan-Lori Parks, who won in 2002 for "Top Dog/Underdog." Other winners in arts and literature include minimalist composer Steve Reich in music for "Double Sextet"; Elizabeth Strout in fiction for her short story collection, "Olive Kitteridge," set in small-town Maine; Annette Gordon-Reed for history for "The Hemingses of Monticello: An American Family"; Jon Meacham for biography for "American Lion: Andrew Jackson in the White House"; poet W.S. Merwin for his collection "The Shadow of Sirius"; and Douglas A. Blackmon in general nonfiction for his book "Slavery by Another Name: The Re-Enslavement of Black Americans From the Civil War to World War II."
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August 27, 2008 | From the Associated Press
American soprano Renee Fleming and Pink Floyd band members Nick Mason and Roger Waters were awarded this year's Swedish Polar Music Prize in Stockholm on Tuesday. The award committee said that Fleming won because of her unparalleled voice and Pink Floyd for its monumental contribution to the development of popular culture. Each award is worth $157,700. The Polar prize is Sweden's biggest music award and is usually split between pop artists and classical musicians. The 2007 prize went to jazz saxophonist Sonny Rollins and composer Steve Reich.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 22, 2007
Polar prize: Composer Steve Reich, 70, and saxophonist Sonny Rollins, 76, were in Stockholm on Monday to receive the 2007 Polar Music Prizes, awarded by Sweden's Royal Academy of Music. Each received $147,000.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 2008 | Mark Swed, Times Music Critic
Everyone has had the experience of disagreeing with a critic, but do critics ever second-guess themselves? We asked Calendar's critics whether there are any reviews they regret. One in a series of occasional articles. -- Since 1976, I have enjoyed the music of Philip Glass. Before then, I did not. "Einstein on the Beach" changed everything. Experiencing the five-hour opera with its repetitious score performed without a break, no real text and a staging by Robert Wilson full of unforgettable images may not have been the full-blown religious conversion for me that it had been to some.
NEWS
June 11, 2008
Ojai Music Festival: A review of the Ojai Music Festival in Tuesday's Calendar section misspelled the Steve Reich composition "Tehillim" as "Tehellim."
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