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Steve Reuther

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BUSINESS
September 20, 1994 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weeks of speculation about how they planned to finance their new film production company, producers Michael Douglas and Steve Reuther said Monday that their ambitious 12-picture, four-year deal will be backed by German entertainment tycoon Bodo Scriba. In an interview at their new offices on the Paramount Pictures lot, the two added that Douglas has committed to star in three of the 12 films, with budgets averaging $35 million to $40 million.
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BUSINESS
September 20, 1994 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After weeks of speculation about how they planned to finance their new film production company, producers Michael Douglas and Steve Reuther said Monday that their ambitious 12-picture, four-year deal will be backed by German entertainment tycoon Bodo Scriba. In an interview at their new offices on the Paramount Pictures lot, the two added that Douglas has committed to star in three of the 12 films, with budgets averaging $35 million to $40 million.
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BUSINESS
January 10, 1995 | JAMES BATES
Film: In a second major production arrangement involving outside financing, Paramount Pictures signed a deal with Lakeshore Entertainment Corp., a new production firm controlled by former Beacon Communications partner and Chicago real estate developer Tom Rosenberg. Under the deal, Lakeshore, based on the Paramount lot, is expected to provide all financing in making at least 15 films Paramount will distribute over five years.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 25, 1990 | Pat H. Broeske
Hot on the heels of his "Rocky V," director John Avildsen is preparing to jump back into the ring. But this time, heavy themes accompany the heavy punches. The central character of "The Power of One" lives in South Africa, circa 1950, when the country is in transition from an English colony to an Afrikaner state. "The story takes place as the curtain of apartheid is descending," says screenwriter Robert Mark Kamen, who previously teamed with director Avildsen for the three "Karate Kid" titles.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 25, 1989 | LEONARD KLADY
Richard Gere plays a ruthless New York collector, whose L.A. purchases include streetwalker Julia Roberts in Touchstone's "3000," filming locally in July. Garry Marshall directs the John Lawton--Stephen Metcalfe script, a contemporary, dark Pygmalion tale. Steve Reuther and Arnan Milchan produce. . . . Matthew Modine, Eric Stoltz, D. B. Sweeney, Billy Zane and Harry Connick Jr. wing off next month to enlist in Warner Bros./Engima's "Memphis Belle." Monte Merrick's script, inspired by the World War II documentary, focuses on an American bomber crew and the media campaign created around its 25th mission.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 17, 1993 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Striking Distance" (citywide) opens and closes with a pair of jolting high-speed chases, the first over Pittsburgh streets, the second over the rivers that encircle the city's center. In between is a lively mystery thriller that hurtles past plot contrivances and unintended laughs to deliver the goods as a satisfying escapist diversion.
BUSINESS
January 16, 1998 | Claudia Eller
While Warner Bros. rides high on a record $850-million deal with NBC for the nation's top-rated TV show, "ER," the studio's prolonged dry spell at the box office has forced co-Chairman Terry Semel to refocus his energies on the company's beleaguered motion picture business.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1994 | ALAN CITRON and CLAUDIA ELLER
In the rough-and-tumble world of Team Disney, one of the late Frank G. Wells' many unrecorded acts was mediating confrontations between Chairman Michael D. Eisner and studio chief Jeffrey Katzenberg, whose long-running partnership has been punctuated by more than a few flare-ups. Now, as Katzenberg charts his future at Disney, Wells' presence may be missed more than ever.
BUSINESS
July 31, 2003 | Claudia Eller and Michael Cieply, Times Staff Writers
The consensus in Hollywood and political circles is that Arnold Schwarzenegger is giving up on the notion of transforming himself from actor into governor. His flagging movie career may require an even more challenging makeover. Despite his return to the signature cyborg role in "Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines" this summer, the 56-year-old Schwarzenegger has been struggling in recent years to maintain his status in an industry that has seldom been kind to its aging stars.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 1987 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
In "China Girl" (selected theaters) Abel Ferrara has another ultraviolent winner, a Romeo and Juliet tale set in Lower East Side Manhattan's cheek-by-jowl Little Italy and Chinatown. Ferrara and writer Nicholas St. John, whose previous pictures are "Driller Killer," "Ms. 45" and "Fear City," can create gritty and exciting Manhattan street fables like no one else, and Ferrara has a way of making violence expressive and therefore acceptable as few other directors can.
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