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Steve Sabol

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September 19, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Half of the father-son team that revolutionized sports broadcasting, NFL Films President Steve Sabol, died Tuesday of brain cancer. If you aren't a fan of the NFL, you may not realize what an impact Sabol had, not only on football, but on all sports, with his innovative ideas on showing highlights of games. But fans of the NFL, and people inside the sport, know what a great loss this was. A sampling of reactions: Terrell Owens (via Twitter): RIP Steve Sabol. I was fortunate 2 work w/Steve during my tenure w/the SF 49ers.
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SPORTS
January 2, 2014 | Sam Farmer
Will an Arctic chill play into the weather-worn hands of the Green Bay Packers? Not necessarily. The forecast calls for bitter cold Sunday afternoon when the Packers play host to San Francisco in the first round of the NFL playoffs, but that doesn't necessarily mean Green Bay will have an advantage on the famed Frozen Tundra. According to Packers.com, Green Bay is 3-4 in games played at Lambeau Field when the temperature at kickoff is 6 degrees or lower. Sunday's forecast is staggeringly cold - a high of minus-3 and a low of minus-19.
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ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2012 | By Joe Flint
When people think about the big stars that turned the National Football League into America's No. 1 sport, the names that are usually mentioned  include legendary quarterbacks Joe Namath, John Elway and Tom Brady. Steve Sabol also belongs on that list. The longtime president of NFL Films who died Tuesday at the age of 69 after a battle with brain cancer , was with his father Ed a chronicler of the league's history for four decades.  NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell called Sabol a "creative genius whose legacy will be part of the NFL forever.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2012 | By Joe Flint
  In the final scene of "The Godfather," Michael Corleone authoritatively tells his wife, "Don't ask me about my business, Kay. " It appears that the networks that carry National Football League games are playing the role of Kay to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell's Michael Corleone. While on-air talent has not been shy about criticizing the replacement referees the NFL has hired while it tries to resolve a labor dispute with its regular officials, the top brass is staying quiet.
SPORTS
September 18, 2012 | Chris Erskine
With Steve Sabol as lensman, editor and resident poet, NFL Films didn't just capture pro football's blood-stained quirks and foggy breath, it established an aura you could see and feel. "The autumn wind is a pirate, blustering in from sea," he once wrote for voiceover specialist John Facenda, whose bell-tower tones earned him the nickname "The Voice of God. " So, yeah, in a way, Sabol put words into God's mouth. Sabol, an art history major who went on to become one of the most celebrated sports filmmakers of his time, died of brain cancer Tuesday at the age of 69, leaving behind a legacy that can be seen in every video montage from "SportsCenter" to your local news.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2012 | By Joe Flint
It used to be an anomaly when a National Football League game ran more than three hours. Now it has become the norm. According to the NFL, so far this season the average run time of a typical game is 3:11:56. That's about six minutes longer than what games averaged in 2011. Monday's game between the Atlanta Falcons and Denver Broncos ran an astounding 3:40 and there was nothing exceptional about it to explain why it took so long to complete. On CBS, games are running about eight minutes longer than last season.
SPORTS
October 30, 1987 | Larry Stewart
When Steve Sabol was growing up in the Philadelphia area in the 1950s, his father, Ed, would film Steve's high school football games with a 16-millimeter camera. Filming football games grew into more than just an avocation for Ed Sabol when, in 1962, he paid $3,000 for the rights to film that year's National Football League championship game. Sabol took his 25-minute film and, financed by a cigarette company, toured the country, showing it to various service groups.
SPORTS
December 21, 2008 | MICHAEL WILBON, Wilbon is a columnist for the Washington Post.
Too often the discussion of Greatest QB Ever begins with Joe Montana. Occasionally, the pick is one of his contemporaries, John Elway. If somebody closer to 60 years old is in the room there might be some substantive examination of John Unitas. Only if there's a real student of pro football in the mix will Otto Graham's name be tossed. Hardly ever does the discussion roll back far enough to include Slingin' Sammy Baugh, the greatest Redskin ever, without question, and almost certainly the first great passing quarterback in pro football history.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2012 | By Joe Flint
  In the final scene of "The Godfather," Michael Corleone authoritatively tells his wife, "Don't ask me about my business, Kay. " It appears that the networks that carry National Football League games are playing the role of Kay to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell's Michael Corleone. While on-air talent has not been shy about criticizing the replacement referees the NFL has hired while it tries to resolve a labor dispute with its regular officials, the top brass is staying quiet.
SPORTS
December 25, 2010 | Sam Farmer
When the New York Giants play at Green Bay on Sunday, temperatures are expected to dip into the low teens. Surely, somebody will refer to the "frozen tundra" of Lambeau Field. Funny thing about that phrase, though, is that Vince Lombardi didn't like it, and didn't want it used in the Packers' highlight films. It was coined by Steve Sabol, now president of NFL Films, and he used it in his script for the "Ice Bowl," the 1967 NFL championship game between the Packers and Dallas Cowboys.
SPORTS
September 19, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
Half of the father-son team that revolutionized sports broadcasting, NFL Films President Steve Sabol, died Tuesday of brain cancer. If you aren't a fan of the NFL, you may not realize what an impact Sabol had, not only on football, but on all sports, with his innovative ideas on showing highlights of games. But fans of the NFL, and people inside the sport, know what a great loss this was. A sampling of reactions: Terrell Owens (via Twitter): RIP Steve Sabol. I was fortunate 2 work w/Steve during my tenure w/the SF 49ers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2012 | By Joe Flint
When people think about the big stars that turned the National Football League into America's No. 1 sport, the names that are usually mentioned  include legendary quarterbacks Joe Namath, John Elway and Tom Brady. Steve Sabol also belongs on that list. The longtime president of NFL Films who died Tuesday at the age of 69 after a battle with brain cancer , was with his father Ed a chronicler of the league's history for four decades.  NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell called Sabol a "creative genius whose legacy will be part of the NFL forever.
SPORTS
September 18, 2012 | Chris Erskine
With Steve Sabol as lensman, editor and resident poet, NFL Films didn't just capture pro football's blood-stained quirks and foggy breath, it established an aura you could see and feel. "The autumn wind is a pirate, blustering in from sea," he once wrote for voiceover specialist John Facenda, whose bell-tower tones earned him the nickname "The Voice of God. " So, yeah, in a way, Sabol put words into God's mouth. Sabol, an art history major who went on to become one of the most celebrated sports filmmakers of his time, died of brain cancer Tuesday at the age of 69, leaving behind a legacy that can be seen in every video montage from "SportsCenter" to your local news.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 18, 2012 | Mike Kupper, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Steve Sabol, who helped his father get an unlikely fledgling movie company off the ground, then later took over and expanded the family business, now known to sports fans as NFL Films, has died. He was 69. Sabol, who had served as president of NFL Films since 1985, died Tuesday, the company announced. He had been diagnosed with brain cancer in March 2011. "Steve Sabol was the creative genius behind the remarkable work of NFL Films," NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said in a statement.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2012 | By Joe Flint
It used to be an anomaly when a National Football League game ran more than three hours. Now it has become the norm. According to the NFL, so far this season the average run time of a typical game is 3:11:56. That's about six minutes longer than what games averaged in 2011. Monday's game between the Atlanta Falcons and Denver Broncos ran an astounding 3:40 and there was nothing exceptional about it to explain why it took so long to complete. On CBS, games are running about eight minutes longer than last season.
SPORTS
December 25, 2010 | Sam Farmer
When the New York Giants play at Green Bay on Sunday, temperatures are expected to dip into the low teens. Surely, somebody will refer to the "frozen tundra" of Lambeau Field. Funny thing about that phrase, though, is that Vince Lombardi didn't like it, and didn't want it used in the Packers' highlight films. It was coined by Steve Sabol, now president of NFL Films, and he used it in his script for the "Ice Bowl," the 1967 NFL championship game between the Packers and Dallas Cowboys.
SPORTS
January 2, 2014 | Sam Farmer
Will an Arctic chill play into the weather-worn hands of the Green Bay Packers? Not necessarily. The forecast calls for bitter cold Sunday afternoon when the Packers play host to San Francisco in the first round of the NFL playoffs, but that doesn't necessarily mean Green Bay will have an advantage on the famed Frozen Tundra. According to Packers.com, Green Bay is 3-4 in games played at Lambeau Field when the temperature at kickoff is 6 degrees or lower. Sunday's forecast is staggeringly cold - a high of minus-3 and a low of minus-19.
SPORTS
January 31, 2010 | By Sam Farmer
Down . . . set . . . uncut! The 44th Super Bowl is at hand, and NFL Films has been there for every one of them, documenting not just what happens on the field but many things that even the most ardent fans wouldn't otherwise see. NFL Films founder Ed Sabol started it all when, in 1962, he bid $3,000 for the film rights to the NFL championship game. Since, the company has filmed more than 9,300 NFL games, and shoots enough 16-millimeter film per season to stretch from Indianapolis to New Orleans -- with almost 200 miles of celluloid to spare.
SPORTS
February 1, 2010 | By Sam Farmer
Steve Sabol, the easygoing president of NFL Films and one of football's great storytellers, has a handwritten sign on his desk that reads, "The buck doesn't even pause here." Like his father, Ed, before him, Sabol wants his company's filmmakers to spread their creative wings, take risks, find new ways to tell stories. It's that creativity that helped build NFL Films into the empire it is today, changed how we watch football, and has left a significant imprint on Hollywood.
SPORTS
January 31, 2010 | By Sam Farmer
Down . . . set . . . uncut! The 44th Super Bowl is at hand, and NFL Films has been there for every one of them, documenting not just what happens on the field but many things that even the most ardent fans wouldn't otherwise see. NFL Films founder Ed Sabol started it all when, in 1962, he bid $3,000 for the film rights to the NFL championship game. Since, the company has filmed more than 9,300 NFL games, and shoots enough 16-millimeter film per season to stretch from Indianapolis to New Orleans -- with almost 200 miles of celluloid to spare.
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